RA Movie Thread (Read 5546 times)


I'm back!

    Zombies? Still??? I was ready to be done with zombies five years or so ago. Actually I think 28 Days Later (2002) would have been good as the final zombie movie in my book.

    jimmyb


    port-a-bella-potty

      Had  an apocalyptic B-movie afternoon yesterday afternoon on Netflix streaming, watching  2012 Ice Age and Post Impact. Both were in the bad-but-good-cuz-it's-bad category. I laughed the most at 2012 Ice Age. The father was the coolest cucumber ever in any disaster , adventure movie......ever. Nothing phased him, he feared nothing. The ending was hilarious. I recommend it as a hoot and a fine example of b-movieness.

       

      Later on, I watched Special with Michael Rapaport. Very well done, really enjoyed it. One of his finest performances  that I've seen. I've always enjoyed his work.

       

      Log    PRs

        I just got back from a theatrical showing of Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds at Fox Theatre here in Atlanta as a part of their summer film festival.  I've always wanted to see this movie on the big screen, and this was a hundred different kinds of awesome.

         

        Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds features bird sounds in lieu of a music score, and these birds sounds were incredibly loud on the venue sound system. During the film's climax, when the birds have surrounded the house, one could almost believe that they had surrounded Fox Theatre as well.

         

        mab411


        Proboscis Colossus

          I just got back from a theatrical showing of Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds at Fox Theatre here in Atlanta as a part of their summer film festival.  I've always wanted to see this movie on the big screen, and this was a hundred different kinds of awesome.

           

          Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds features bird sounds in lieu of a music score, and these birds sounds were incredibly loud on the venue sound system. During the film's climax, when the birds have surrounded the house, one could almost believe that they had surrounded Fox Theatre as well.

           

           

          Wow, sweet!  Reminds me of Alamo Draftouse's "Summer of 1983" festival this summer.

          "God guides us on our journey, but careful with those feet." - David Lee Roth, of all people


          Interval Junkie --Nobby

            Zombies? Still??? I was ready to be done with zombies five years or so ago. Actually I think 28 Days Weeks Later (2007) would have been good as the final zombie movie in my book.

             

            FTFY

             

            28 Weeks Later is an anti-humanist quarantine film.  Every Hollywood humanist decision the heroes make ends up costing them more than they were trying to save.  Go back for the little girl about to get eaten by zombies?  End up getting zombified then biting your lover as well.  It's a really satisfying film if you're completely sick of Hollywood heroes taking risky longshots against good scientific advice.

             

            Saw World War Z this weekend.  Got roped into it by friends.  It's okay.  Kinda got sick of the family angle.  Over done.  Nothing new except the cold reality that their safety on the life-raft is entirely dependent on the father continuing to be important to the war effort.  There are a lot of "you guys are idiots" moments that have you shaking your fist at characters doing absentminded and klutzy things that move the plot along.  The only satisfying one is the fate of the "hope for all humanity".  The pleasant surprise here is the Israeli soldier Segen, played by  Daniella Kertesz.  Most times female solders portrayed in film are either incompetent, eye-candy, or hyper-competent and stone-cold.  Instead, Kertesz walks the fine line of having the events impact her without crumbling into an emotional wreck; like a good soldier of her purported caliber she is there to help any way she can.  It's understated and fully satisfying.  Other than the "10th man rule" and the North Korean cure to the zombie problem, this film doesn't have a lot to add.  A good pop-corner, though.  (3/5).

             

            Daniella Kertesz

            2014 Goals:  sub-3 Marathon 

            Current Status 06/19: Pelvic stress-fracture = 6-weeks of no running.

              I just got back from a theatrical showing of Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds at Fox Theatre here in Atlanta as a part of their summer film festival.  I've always wanted to see this movie on the big screen, and this was a hundred different kinds of awesome.

               

              Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds features bird sounds in lieu of a music score, and these birds sounds were incredibly loud on the venue sound system. During the film's climax, when the birds have surrounded the house, one could almost believe that they had surrounded Fox Theatre as well.

               

               

              What I enjoyed most about seeing this poster was that I did not realize Suzanne Pleshette was in that movie. I can't remember her from anything other than The Bob Newhart Show, which of course was brilliant. I bet she looked pretty hot in her younger days in The Birds, she looked pretty damn good in Newhart.

               

              I saw The Birds only once, many years ago, and actually don't remember much about it other than the noise of the birds. So I can only imagine what it was like seeing it in that kind of environment. I once saw Lawrence of Arabia at the Fox Theater in Detroit; no relationship to the one in Atlanta, but I presume a similiar situation - a big BIG screen. It was truly a different experience for an epic film like that, compared to seeing it at the local multiplex.

              Dave

              jimmyb


              port-a-bella-potty

                The Birds is one of the most memorable movies from when I was a boy. Unbeknownst to my parents, I watched it at a friend's house in 1971 and the scene with dead guy with his eyes plucked out gave me nightmares. That was the most horrible thing I'd ever seen at that point.

                 

                FUN FACT: Tippi Hedren is Melanie Griffith's mom.

                 

                I watched the movie a few years back, and it hold's up, as many of Hitchcock's films still do. There's not much of a music soundtrack if i remember correctly. Mostly just the sound of the birds, the environment, and dialogue (and screaming). Effective.

                 

                Thanks for the tip on the movie fest at the Fox Theatre. Cool

                Log    PRs

                mab411


                Proboscis Colossus

                  Wife's out of town, I've been hitting Netflix for movies that I know she wouldn't be interested in.

                   

                  Conan the Barbarian (2011) - Hey, Ron Perlman!  After that...meh.

                   

                  Commando - haven't seen this one in a dog's age, just put it on because it caught my eye in the "similar movies" section.  WOW, does this movie not hold up.  So many hilarious action movie tropes!  Though I do give it a few points for being the only Arnie movie I can remember that attempts to explain his accent.

                   

                  Currently watching Clerks.  I wish Kevin Smith was still around.

                  "God guides us on our journey, but careful with those feet." - David Lee Roth, of all people

                  jimmyb


                  port-a-bella-potty

                    Kevin Smith's last movie was Red State. It was okay. His Q+A about making the movie and his dealing with the Westboro church is a lot more entertaining (on Netflix). He self-marketed it with a tour of shows where he does his Q+A. I think he turned a profit. He got of a bit of a bad rap from Bruce Willis when he directed Cop Out . According to Smith himself,  Smith has become a major pothead because he feels more himself and he gets more done. But according to WIllis, he wasn't directing too well because he was high all the time. Smith has sort of become this stand-up comic with his Q+A, he's actually very good at it. He's also a major podcaster with his Smodcast empire. He loves to talk, but I noticed after awhile, he started repeating himself. I hope he doesn't give up on writing/directing, he has a unique voice that's a lot of fun. He did his best work straight. But who knows what's to come...

                     

                    Last night, I watched Star Trek 3: Search For Spock on Netflix. I had watched Wrath Of Khan (#2) a few months back (still good). THis one though....I found myself laughing and tearing it apart for its lack of logic, instead of enjoying it. Doesn't hold up.

                    Log    PRs

                    mab411


                    Proboscis Colossus

                      Kevin Smith's last movie was Red State. It was okay. His Q+A about making the movie and his dealing with the Westboro church is a lot more entertaining (on Netflix). He self-marketed it with a tour of shows where he does his Q+A. I think he turned a profit. He got of a bit of a bad rap from Bruce Willis when he directed Cop Out . According to Smith himself,  Smith has become a major pothead because he feels more himself and he gets more done. But according to WIllis, he wasn't directing too well because he was high all the time. Smith has sort of become this stand-up comic with his Q+A, he's actually very good at it. He's also a major podcaster with his Smodcast empire. He loves to talk, but I noticed after awhile, he started repeating himself. I hope he doesn't give up on writing/directing, he has a unique voice that's a lot of fun. He did his best work straight. But who knows what's to come...

                       

                       

                       

                      Hmm.  Respectfully, I think you're wrong.  Pretty sure Kevin Smith died during the production of Dogma.  Right before the "S**t Demon" showed up.

                      "God guides us on our journey, but careful with those feet." - David Lee Roth, of all people

                        the Angel's Share - a group of gritty Glasgow neds discover whisky tasting in this bitter-sweet flick.  John Henshaw (Early Doors) is as dependable as ever, and the ending's a double-measure of magic (4.0/5)

                         

                         Pretty sure Kevin Smith died during the production of Dogma.  

                         

                        a bit harsh.  perhaps not up there with Clerks and/or Chasing Amy, but Dogma Red State still worked for me. in addition, both Jay & Silent Bob Strike Back (2001) and Clerks II (2006) were funny as fuck, but hey, that's just my small-minded take on things.

                        I bought my nephew an elephant for his room. He said, "Thanks". I said, "Don't mention it".

                        mab411


                        Proboscis Colossus

                           

                           

                           

                          a bit harsh.  perhaps not up there with Clerks and/or Chasing Amy, but Dogma Red State still worked for me. in addition, both Jay & Silent Bob Strike Back (2001) and Clerks II (2006) were funny as fuck, but hey, that's just my small-minded take on things.

                           

                          I liked most of Dogma too, but that's about the point I started to notice his engines really starting to sputter, when he started to seriously abandon what he does best - rapid-fire, witty dialogue - for flashy production.  I will say Clerks II was a satisfying, dialogue-driven sequel - I just finished my viewing of the first one, and noticed that it does end with a comma rather than a period.  But it seems to fall prey to the other gremlin that seems to have crept into his writing, this sense he seems to have that in order for a scene to be funny, it also has to be profane.  I'm not talking about language, I'm talking about the subject matter.

                           

                          Take Randall, for example...in Clerks, yes, it was part of the character that he liked porn and the seedier side of life, but it was ancillary to his seething contempt for the customers in his store and his loyalty to Dante.  In Clerks II, yes, the friendship with Dante is there (and is, happily, even more at the forefront), but my memory is that almost all other dialogue and scenes involving Randall carried a hard-R rating, with the notable exception of the "Star Wars vs. LOTR" scene and the hilarious running "Porch Monkey" joke.  Smith even stuck in a completely unnecessary foil to emphasize this in the character of that kid whose name escapes me at the moment.  I might be wrong, I've slept a few times since last I saw Clerks II.  I might as well watch it next, and if I think otherwise, I'll come back and say so.  But in both his movies and his first podcast ("Smodcast," which I gave up on long ago and don't think he does anymore), I very much have the impression that he thinks more profane = more funny, and I think his reliance on that equation is hindering his creativity.

                          "God guides us on our journey, but careful with those feet." - David Lee Roth, of all people

                          ShuffleFaster


                            I just saw "Monsters University"

                             

                            I thought it was clever and funny--lots of callbacks to "Monsters, Inc."--but was, by it's very nature, less original that the first film.   Still, I thought it was money well spent, and my whole family had a good time.  Glad I saw it on the big screen.

                             

                            It does, however, continue the current Hollywood trend of prequels/sequels/remakes/reboots.   Must be hard to come up with new ideas these days....

                            FSocks


                            Gramps

                              Saw Many of Steel this past weekend.  I'm pretty burned out on the super hero genre but this trailer to this had to be the best looking trailer I have seen for any movie in maybe forever.

                               

                              I like it for the most part with a few nitpicks.  I'm normally not a big fan of the "flashback" device but it works well in this movie to break up the tension of the moment.  Well done.

                               

                              I like the story telling of the first half of the movie as it brought a lot of credence to the characters.

                               

                              Then the movie switches gear and goes all "action" for the last hour of the movie.  Its to the point with the CGI that there doesn't seem to be any more that can be done: buildings falling, check; planes crashing, check; super hero/villain who never seems to die, check; unmitigated mayhem and disaster, check.

                               

                              Still a good movie and I don't regret paying the money to see it which is something I don't often say when going to the big screen.

                              Running is dumb. 


                              delicate flower

                                I saw The Heat with the wife last weekend.  Female buddy cop movie starring Melissa McCarthy and Sandra Bullock.  It was your pretty typical predictable buddy cop movie, but it made me laugh a lot.  Melissa McCarthy cracks me up and just has a filthy mouth in this movie.  It's not just cursing, but it's the creative use of it that had me laughing.  Language laughs aside, McCarthy and Bullock seem to have a pretty good on screen chemistry.  Lots of laughs in this one, although it's probably more of a renter rather than paying $11 at the movies.

                                roboknee.