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Shoe review: NB 902 (Read 504 times)


who knows...

    Has anyone had the opportunity to run the New Balance 902s on varied terrain and over 100 miles? (Varied terrain = roads to trails [moderate to mild technicality]) They fit nice in the store, though I am curious as to how the mid-foot/mid-sole cushioning holds up after a while, esp. for runs of 10+ miles.
    "There is no I in εγω." --Unknown author, source of possible, but in no way certain, Greek origin
    PWL


    Has been

      I think Kirsten (Zoom-Zoom) has the 902. I'm sure she'll respond soon!

      "I would never die for my beliefs, because I might be wrong."--Bertrand Russell


      Needs more cowbell!

        I do, but haven't really run more than 4-5 miles at a go, yet and only have logged 26 miles total in them. So far I really love them, but I haven't yet decided if I am ready to try running anything longer than maybe 5-6 miles in them. I'm not particularly fast, so they don't really make a noticeable difference in my speed (or lack thereof). I do love how lightweight and flexible they are, but I worry that the flexibility will set my arch tendonitis issues off if I press my luck running too many miles at a crack in them. I also really miss the forefoot cushion that my 767s have in comparison and I think I'd notice it greatly on longer runs and races. I think this would be true for me with any lightweight trainer/performance type shoe, though. k

        I shoot pretty things! ~

        '14 Goals:

        • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

        • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)


        who knows...

          kirsten: thanks for the response. When trying them on, I noticed, similar to your mention, that the forefoot (and mid, for me) seemed to be softer than other shoes of the same caliber (at least those in the same store). Seems like we are noticing some of the same issues. I think I keep looking at them because they are so unabashedly orange Smile
          "There is no I in εγω." --Unknown author, source of possible, but in no way certain, Greek origin