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Protein shake after workouts (Read 1431 times)


uncontrollable

    Eating healthy ... lactose intolerant - so avoid most dairy ... never liked red meat & eat chicken and fish a few times a week but no everyday.  Have not felt like I am recovering enough after long runs & speed work to be ready for next run.  Just this week I have started taking Muscle Milk protein shake after hard or long workouts.  No lactose is what it claims, does get protein from milk proteins though, so far no GI problems.  Anyone else do shakes to supplement?  Have you noticed a difference overall?  How many grams are in your shakes?  One scoop of mine gives me 16 GM for 150 calories - mixed with water.  Mixes VERY well - NO lumps at all.  Tastes really good too.

    peace


    Interval Junkie --Nobby

      Vegetarian here: I eat eggs and lots of nuts.  Works for me.

      2014 Goals:  sub-3 Marathon 

      Current Status 06/19: Pelvic stress-fracture = 6-weeks of no running.


      uncontrollable

        I love & eat a lot of nuts as well but the fat & calories add up very fast for a relatively small amount.  Eggs cause GI issues for me as well.  Just trying to get variety but it's not easy.

        peace

          I'm a vegetarian too.  I eat lots of Cliff builder bars, but I also sometimes do Muscle Milk shakes.  I think protein after a run is a good idea, and from what I read (don't really know much about it) long runs do increase your protein requirement a lot. 


          Black-Toe-Nailed

            I'm a vegetarian too.  I eat lots of Cliff builder bars, but I also sometimes do Muscle Milk shakes.  I think protein after a run is a good idea, and from what I read (don't really know much about it) long runs do increase your protein requirement a lot. 

             

            Not the long runs per se but any long workouts. (BTW, I'm veggi too).

             

            But note that one thing is your total protein requirement and a different thing is the recovery drink.

             

            It has been proven that 1/4 or 1/3 of protein per part of carbs is the best  combination. I am now using a mix of four parts of pure maltodextrine 

            plus one part of soy protein. 

             

            Maltodextrine is dead cheap as it is indeed an industrial ingredient for beer brewing (it's made from malt, btw). 

            I also take an extra dose of aminoacids and I have ordered 500g of β-alanine.

             

            I have also had good results with a L-glutamin and L-Carnitine, these are aminoacids too. It does in fact seem that the really important aminoacid  for recovery is L-Glutamin. L-Carnitine plays a secondary role but they work very good together. 

             

            To keep it simple use the 1/4 formulation: For a 200 calories drink you need 40g of maltodextrine and 12g of protein isolate (soy and whey normally come in 80-90% concentration). 

             

            Instead of maltodextrine you can use glucose (dextrose, sold as 'grape-sugar' in health stores) but the advantage of maltodextrine is that it gets absorbed faster than glucose. Normal sugar or honey will of course also do the job but the faster you get the stuff into your blood-stream the better.

             

            As maltodextrine is completely flavour-neutral and soy protein has a "beany" taste I sometimes add salt and vegetable stock to make a soup... specially nice now in the winter.

             

            As for the total protein requirement: It should be 0.5 - 1g per pound of weight more or less. For a guy like me, 5'8" and 147 pounds it should be thus 72 - 147g.

            --

            "If one can stick to the training throughout the many long years,
            then will power is no longer a problem. It's raining? That doesn't matter.
            I am tired? That's besides the point. It's simply that I just have to."

            Emil Zatopek

            John Messick


              Hello friends,

               

              Yes it is a good idea to consume protein before and after a workout, but it should be known that the most crucial time, after your workout. During the three hours after your workout is essentially your muscle making window of opportunity. When your muscles are basically starving for protein and makes the most use of them. I suggest a fast acting protein such as whey immediately after, like within 15 minutes! Typically, this is a protein powder that you mix with water or milk. Sometime after that, within the three hour window consume a good whole food meal containing at least 30 grams of protein and 50-80 grams of complex carbs such as white rice, pasta, baked potato, etc. The reason I suggest the use of a complex carbs at this time is not to make you fat because it won't. Complex carbs will raise you insulin levels and shoot all those good nutrients through your bloodstream straight to repairing your muscles. It's also a good time to enjoy that plate of spaghetti or rice. If you are looking to gain weight, then eating pasta, brown rice or a baked potatoes is a great suggestion however, if your goal is to lose weight I suggest eating half of what you would for rice or pasta and replace it with broccoli and green beans.

               

              Regards

              John Messick


              Black-Toe-Nailed

                I use soy because whey is not available in pure form. It's biological soy (not acid extracted, thus safe).

                I do also use a ready made formulation with a mix of soy, whey and egg with maltodextrine. The problem is that I bought 15kg (33 pounds) of the stuff and only in one flavour so that I am rather fed up, lol.

                 

                I also add 5g of L-Glutamin and an aminoacid compound to my post-workout. Soy is a complete protein, meaning hat it has all the essential aminoacids, but just for good measure. And L-glutamin is traditionally taken by bodybuilders in their post-workout drinks as it improves muscle rebuilding.

                 

                What I do is to mix the dry components in a shaker bottle and leave it in kitchen so that I can grab it just after the run or workout.

                --

                "If one can stick to the training throughout the many long years,
                then will power is no longer a problem. It's raining? That doesn't matter.
                I am tired? That's besides the point. It's simply that I just have to."

                Emil Zatopek

                  You can manage perfectly well just by eating regular food after you run.

                   

                  This is also the way the best marathoners in the world do it.. See e.g.: http://www.active.com/running/Articles/Eating_practices_of_the_best_endurance_athletes_in_the_world.htm

                    You can manage perfectly well just by eating regular food after you run.

                     

                    This is also the way the best marathoners in the world do it.. See e.g.: http://www.active.com/running/Articles/Eating_practices_of_the_best_endurance_athletes_in_the_world.htm

                     

                    1500m to 12K = endurance athletes?

                     

                    Aside from that, it jives with my belief that a balanced diet without excessive protein and fat is what we need.  Duh.  The fancy and expensive supplements that are marketed to athletes are pretty much snake oil.

                    Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

                      1500m to 12K = endurance athletes?

                       

                       

                      Ah - I didn't notice that about those in that particular study, but the point is that pretty much everything we hear about the way Kenyan runners eat gives more or less the same message.


                      HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer

                        Ah - I didn't notice that about those in that particular study, but the point is that pretty much everything we hear about the way Kenyan runners eat gives more or less the same message.

                         

                        That article said, essentially, that obviously the way they are currently eating is optimal.

                         

                        They just assumed that, as far as I could see.

                         

                        It may well be true, but, they didn't seem to bother to even present an argument in its favor.

                        It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.

                          That article said, essentially, that obviously the way they are currently eating is optimal.

                           

                          They just assumed that, as far as I could see.

                           

                          It may well be true, but, they didn't seem to bother to even present an argument in its favor.

                           

                          I've no idea whether it's optimal (which would be a rather hard thing to prove), but it illustrates that you can be a good distance runner without worrying about any fancy foods or supplements. 

                          Scout7


                          CPT Curmudgeon

                            1500m to 12K = endurance athletes?

                             

                            What would you call them?

                              I've no idea whether it's optimal (which would be a rather hard thing to prove), but it illustrates that you can be a good distance runner without worrying about any fancy foods or supplements. 

                               It illustrates the habits of elite professional marathon runners, many of whom are not "on-the-go," in the same way that the OP (a competitive hobby jogger) may be.  

                               


                               

                              "If you have the fire, run..." -John Climacus

                              Scout7


                              CPT Curmudgeon

                                 It illustrates the habits of elite professional marathon runners, many of whom are not "on-the-go," in the same way that the OP (a competitive hobby jogger) may be.  

                                 

                                If anything, I would think a competitive hobby jogger who is on-the-go has even less need of protein shakes after workouts.

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