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Confidance (Read 968 times)

    Question for all the experienced racers. Have you always had the confidance or did it come in time? I find myself worried about what's in front of me. If I we're to run one of the local running club 5k over at little Lehigh I'm sure I'd be able to set a new PB since I know the course (hilly). How do you stop worring about what's in front of you and that you're going to set yourself up for a fall? When I first started doing 5k's I did them around my area where I knew what I was getting into and had no problem pushing myself and feeling like I gave it my best shot. I'm just not feeling that way the last few road races. I know it's a mental thing, so I'm sure there's some kind of mental game that will help, just need some ideas. TIA Modified to add I wasn't tring to give all today, this is just something I've realized I've been struggling with these past few months.

    Your toughness is made up of equal parts persistence and experience. You don't so much outrun your opponents as outlast and outsmart them, and the toughest opponent of all is the one inside your head." - Joe Henderson

      Hey Pam, Check this article out. It's on the topic of confidence. http://www.runningtimes.com/rt/articles/?id=4924&page=1&c=137
        I'm new as well. I just go out and try. If your only goal is to un the best you can on that day then you won't have as much pressure. If you finish slow then you have something to work on. If you finish fast then all the hard work paid off. Just remember. Running is supposed to be enjoyable. Don't stress yourself so it's not.

        My sport's your sport's punishment

         

        2012 goals

                      

        100 Km month         150 K month      200K month

        5K run    10K run     20K run              30K run

        sub 30 min 5K         sub 55min 10K

          Hey Pam, Check this article out. It's on the topic of confidence. http://www.runningtimes.com/rt/articles/?id=4924&page=1&c=137
          THANKS JEFF!!!

          Your toughness is made up of equal parts persistence and experience. You don't so much outrun your opponents as outlast and outsmart them, and the toughest opponent of all is the one inside your head." - Joe Henderson

          jcasetnl


            If it's causing you stress, just run for fun and don't worry about the times.
                Jeff, how long are you going to be in ?Spain?

                Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the number of moments that take our breath away...(unkown)




                Go With The Flow
                Thyroid Support Group

                  If it's causing you stress, just run for fun and don't worry about the times.
                  It's not causing me stress. I do run just for fun MOST of the time. HOWEVER I don't always race just to have fun. I've always had a problem with sabotoging myself from doing my best. In fact my longer races I've always ran with dh (except for a couple trail races) just because of my anxiety. I am doing something about that though. Looks like I'll probably be signing up for the Lehigh River Marathon in September without him. Of course I'm not racing it. I don't race to be the fastest (never will be) however I want to due the best that I'm capable of and that means I need to work on confidance.

                  Your toughness is made up of equal parts persistence and experience. You don't so much outrun your opponents as outlast and outsmart them, and the toughest opponent of all is the one inside your head." - Joe Henderson

                  Scout7


                  CPT Curmudgeon

                    I see this as being two-fold: One is experience. You get less nervous, or at least learn how to deal with those feelings, the more you experience them. So, really, it comes down to doing races. The other aspect is in your last post. You want to do the best you can. Of course, we all do. But, I think that you're entirely too hard on yourself about it. Set a series of goals. You should have a primary goal, and then the goals above that one. If you don't make the secondary goal(s), you can be happy with the fact that your primary objective has been met. The last part of goal-setting is realizing that we don't always make those goals. Dealing with it afterwards can go a long way towards having confidence at the next race. Personally, I think you should find a routine. A routine that you do before training runs, that you can then do before races. That routine will help calm and focus you, and tell your body that you're now ready to run. Whether it's a word you repeat, or a series of stretches, or doing strides off the line. Anything works. That and remembering that it's just a race, tomorrow is a new day, and not meeting goals does not equate to having someone dragging you out back and flogging you. Unless you like that.
                      I see this as being two-fold: One is experience. You get less nervous, or at least learn how to deal with those feelings, the more you experience them. So, really, it comes down to doing races. The other aspect is in your last post. You want to do the best you can. Of course, we all do. But, I think that you're entirely too hard on yourself about it. Set a series of goals. You should have a primary goal, and then the goals above that one. If you don't make the secondary goal(s), you can be happy with the fact that your primary objective has been met. Personally, I think you should find a routine. A routine that you do before training runs, that you can then do before races. That routine will help calm and focus you, and tell your body that you're now ready to run. Whether it's a word you repeat, or a series of stretches, or doing strides off the line. Anything works. That and remembering that it's just a race, tomorrow is a new day, and not meeting goals does not equate to having someone dragging you out back and flogging you. Unless you like that.
                      I have to agree with needing more race experience AND finding a routine to do that will help me relax and focus. I tend to get overstimulated and my brain likes to go a million miles per hour before a race. As for the flogging, I'm more into ******** Wink but shhhhhhhhhhh.

                      Your toughness is made up of equal parts persistence and experience. You don't so much outrun your opponents as outlast and outsmart them, and the toughest opponent of all is the one inside your head." - Joe Henderson

                      Scout7


                      CPT Curmudgeon

                        I tend to get overstimulated and my brain likes to go a million miles per hour before a race.
                        Yes, I know. I've seen you before a race. Overly stimulated is a good description.


                        Wally & Leela

                          My wife has always had a problem with stressing about the course & what is ahead of her too. Now, we just try to get a course map online (or where ever we can get one) and go drive the course the day before the race.

                          It does not matter how slowly you go so long as you do not stop. --Confucius

                            My wife has always had a problem with stressing about the course & what is ahead of her too. Now, we just try to get a course map online (or where ever we can get one) and go drive the course the day before the race.
                            That is such a great idea. I bet that I would relax more if I knew the course before running it. I will have to try that!

                            Michelle



                              My wife has always had a problem with stressing about the course & what is ahead of her too. Now, we just try to get a course map online (or where ever we can get one) and go drive the course the day before the race.
                              I've actually thought about doing that!

                              Your toughness is made up of equal parts persistence and experience. You don't so much outrun your opponents as outlast and outsmart them, and the toughest opponent of all is the one inside your head." - Joe Henderson

                                I've actually thought about doing that!
                                How's Ken?

                                Michelle



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