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Do all running shoes do this in the cold? (Read 889 times)


Needs more cowbell!

    I have noticed that when it is well below freezing (like 25ยบ and colder) that the soles of my shoes feel a lot stiffer and make a very different sound on pavement than they do when it is warmer...it's more of a clapping sound, rather than a softer thud. They feel less cushy, too, but not enough to cause me any pains (the pains come from trying to run on loose snow and ice, not on cold, dry pavement). I also discovered when I ran with backroadrunner in a blizzard this past weekend that her shoes seemed to grip the snow MUCH better than mine. Mine are NBs, hers are Asics...both pairs are quite new, so it's not an issue of more tread wear on mine. I do know that NB uses a different, longer-wearing outsole material on some of their shoe models, including the ones I run in. Perhaps this is the primary issue...? Any ideas? k

    I shoot pretty things! ~

    '14 Goals:

    • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

    • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

      I noticed this as well. I'm actually wondering if it could be related to some injuries I have had before. It makes a lot of sense that the sole materials get hard when they get colder.


      Needs more cowbell!

        Yeah, it's almost more like soft plastic than hard rubber. Very noticeable. k

        I shoot pretty things! ~

        '14 Goals:

        • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

        • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)


        Slow-smooth-fast

          hard floor due to the weather will mean there is a greater normal reaction from the floor, which will cause you to be able to move quicker. Softer ground in the summer - ie softer tarmac etc, decreases the normal reaction and thus makes you run slower. I beleive this is one of the contributory factors to me developing shin splints as I began running in winter.

          "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009


          Needs more cowbell!

            Heh...I am most definitely NOT running faster, unfortunately!

            I shoot pretty things! ~

            '14 Goals:

            • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

            • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

            spacedcadet


              Interesting you should say that, Eddy. The temperature here has gone right down in the last week or so (to around -10 centigrade) and I am finding my runs MUCH easier as a result. After the initial uncomfortable 3-4 minutes, I seem to just fly along wthout much effort at all! Maybe it's just because I want to get home quicker! Big grin
                Zoom, Which of your shoe models is doing this? I just bought the 767 and noticed that I have my old right foot Plop back but the temp was 29 or 30 degrees. Oh and I learned that with that lace system NOT to tie them nice and tight thinking they loosen up as I run! My toes were mad at me for that error. Other than that damned plop sound I really like the NB 767!

                To paraphrase an old poster: Today is the first day of the rest of your training. It doesn’t matter where you started or how far you’ve come. Today is the day. Your training didn’t start 6 weeks ago. Your training started the last time you hit the road. John “the Penguin” Bingham Life is not tried, it is merely survived if you're standing outside the fire


                Needs more cowbell!

                  I have noticed it with both my 767s and my 1222s. I really wonder if it's the rubber NB uses. backroadrunner's shoes do a lot better in terms of grip on snow than either of my pair do, so maybe there's something to my theory. BTW, I REALLY love the 767s...as much, if not more, than the 1222s. It doesn't hurt that they are a LOT cheaper. I can definitely feel less cushion in them, as well as less stability, but it doesn't seem to cause me any issues. They are also noticeably lighter weight. I have the "all-weather" model, which is MUCH warmer on my feet this time of the year. I think I will save my 1222s for longer, dryer runs and for warmer weather. I'm really glad that Trent recommended rotating shoes. I think I will be doing this from now, on. It adds a little variety, too, I think. I have also found that any little aches and pains seem to rotate, as well, which seems to help keep any particular pain from worsening. k

                  I shoot pretty things! ~

                  '14 Goals:

                  • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

                  • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

                    The 767 was recommended by a respected running store in Indy. I have a mild ponation and this shoe is supposed to correct that. I have Nike N'Sight 402 as my first pair. They only have 115 miles on them so I'll rotate between them and the NB 767. BTW that shope feels that spending more than $100 is just waisting money!!! No matter what you spend you ae only going to get 300 to 500 miles out of the shoes

                    To paraphrase an old poster: Today is the first day of the rest of your training. It doesn’t matter where you started or how far you’ve come. Today is the day. Your training didn’t start 6 weeks ago. Your training started the last time you hit the road. John “the Penguin” Bingham Life is not tried, it is merely survived if you're standing outside the fire


                    Needs more cowbell!

                      BTW that shope feels that spending more than $100 is just waisting money!!! No matter what you spend you ae only going to get 300 to 500 miles out of the shoes
                      I'm fairly inclined to agree with that. I really like my 1222s, but full retail on those is ~$135 vs. $90 on the 767s. The 1222s are still a good deal *more* shoe, but probably not enough more to justify the additional almost $50, perhaps. And I didn't find that my first pair of 1222s lasted me any longer than my $85 845s before I started having increasing aches and pains. I'm not certain my stability needs justify that level of stability, either. My 1222s are marketed for moderate-to-severe overpronators, while the 767 is geared towards mild-to-moderate. I can feel the difference, but I don't find that I have any noticeable problems with either shoe, so I might as well go for the cheaper shoe as much as possible. And if I want a shoe with more stability I could always switch from the 1222 to the 857, which is comparable (from everything I have read), but under $100. k

                      I shoot pretty things! ~

                      '14 Goals:

                      • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

                      • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

                      muse_runner


                      keep running.

                        Shocked so glad I live in Cali. the worst that happened to me today was that I ran into a pack of coyotes... like 6-8 of them.
                        running until I hit 1900 miles for the year. whether fast or slow I will just run.


                        Needs more cowbell!

                          Shocked so glad I live in Cali. the worst that happened to me today was that I ran into a pack of coyotes... like 6-8 of them.
                          Eeek! I'll take my chances with cold, deer, and wild turkeys. Tongue k

                          I shoot pretty things! ~

                          '14 Goals:

                          • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

                          • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

                            Eeek! I'll take my chances with cold, deer, and wild turkeys. Tongue k
                            I hear the wild trukeys here in our woods, but in 12 years I have never seen them, while the wife has several times. We have about 9 to 12 head of Whitetail that call our property part of their home, (and the rest of the family are non hunters...............ALL that meat and I'd be shot if I got some). I sometimes her coyotes here but not like we had in CA

                            To paraphrase an old poster: Today is the first day of the rest of your training. It doesn’t matter where you started or how far you’ve come. Today is the day. Your training didn’t start 6 weeks ago. Your training started the last time you hit the road. John “the Penguin” Bingham Life is not tried, it is merely survived if you're standing outside the fire


                            Needs more cowbell!

                              I think I found an explanation in Runner's World. Looks like some midsole materials really do get hard when it's cold. That's something to keep in mind for next Winter. I will also be looking into a pair of those NB trail shoes designed for ice and snow. Apparently they have a special cold-weather cushioning agent that doesn't get hard, as well as treads that shed snow and have good grip (I'm imagining something akin to the rubber used in snow tires). k

                              I shoot pretty things! ~

                              '14 Goals:

                              • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

                              • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

                                Yeah, they do get hard- one way to help would be to toss them on the heating vent for a little while before you head out. I bet the sole material takes a little while to get cold and harden so it probably won't bother you if they're not cold to begin with. Definitely don't keep them outside on the porch or in the cold overnight....
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