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What else do you recommend for staying injury free? (Read 351 times)

hectortrojan


    These days I run around 4 hours a week. Most of my runs are around 50s minutes. I do not run more than 2 days in a row. I do speed work once a week. I do a little over 2 hr long run every other week and take two days off after that. I also take 4 days off every 4 weeks.

     

    I plan to run longer than long run every once in a while. I did a 3:45 hr long run in April and planning on a 4 hr long run in July.

     

    I am increasing mileage extremely slowly. Following is monthly hours for last 3 months.

    April: 17:07

    March:  16:00

    February: 14:28

     

    My goal is to try staying injury free and eventually run longer.

     

    What else do you recommend for staying injury free?


    Latent Runner

      Run on dirt.

      Fat old man PRs:

      • 1-mile (point to point, gravity assist): 5:50
      • 2-mile: 13:49
      • 5K (gravity assist last mile): 21:31
      • 5-Mile: 37:24
      • 10K (first 10K of my Half Marathon): 48:16
      • 10-Mile (first 10 miles of my Half Marathon): 1:17:40
      • Half Marathon: 1:42:13


      just a simple cat

        Yoga for runners

         

        Running is stupid


        Prince of Fatness

          Semi-retired.

             

            Don't do this.

             

            If you run about 4 hrs a week now, and you are thinking of running a 4 hour long run soon and your priority is staying injury free...something doesn't quite compute.

            bap


              Sticking to 2:30 runs max.

              Age 52

              2016 Targets - 100 - 13.2s, 400 - 62s, 800 - 2:30, Mile - 5:40

              hectortrojan


                Run on dirt.

                 

                I agree. All of my long runs are on trails and I try running on the grass/dirt off the road wherever I am able to do so.

                hectortrojan


                   

                  Don't do this.

                   

                  One of the reasons I love running is because of trail running. I love running on the trails. Longer I am out on trail, more enjoyable it is. Due to whatever reasons/excuses I have I am not able to hit trail more than once every two weeks.

                   

                  Recently I have been thinking about going longer than long run every 3 months or so and that is a huge motivation in doing easy runs during weekdays. The way I am thinking about longer run is like a race. Some people work towards different races and train for 12-18 weeks to finish race in goal time. I like to think that I do regular running in order to run longer every 3 months or so. I plan to taper for this longer run the way someone would taper for a goal race. I also plan to take few days off after the longer run to recover.

                    Run every day.

                     

                    Sounds counter intuitive, but it really seems to work for me.  Maybe I've just been really lucky as my only real running injury has been plantar fasciitis and when it was all said and done I'm pretty sure that was a result of changing my shoes that I wear at work rather than running.

                     

                    Of course I've worked up to this over a couple years before I started my first running streak, so this isn't something you would want to do overnight, but I do think the "rest days" are overrated if not actually less beneficial than a recovery run day.

                     

                    Maybe walking during your days off from running would help.

                     

                    What kind of injuries have you had?

                    Age: 46 Weight: 200 Height: 6'2" (Goal weight 195)

                    Current PR's:  Mara 3:48:09; HM 1:43:26; 10K 43:59; 5K 21:27


                    Cheap and Evil Girl

                      I always get hurt when I do speedwork.  I prefer to just run hills at my regular pace.  It's like a speed workout, but easier on you.

                       

                      I run around 300 miles a month.  I have to foam roll regularly, stretch post run, and do additional strength training to make up for weak hips and glutes.  I also work my core, and do a variety of upper body strength training just to keep up my overall fitness.  I buy shoes with good cushioning and replace them every 500 miles whether they need it or not.  I run on dirt roads 100% of the time.  I take off  2 - 4 days per month.

                       

                      I still get hurt.  It's part of running.  The important part is being able to differentiate between pain that is normal and pain that means you have a problem.  And then not ignoring it and hoping it goes away.  <----- I really struggle with this.

                      I HAVE NO IDEA WHAT I AM DOING.  

                       

                      "Mental toughness is built by doing something that is hard over and over again, especially when you don't feel like doing it. Our society has conditioned us to believe that there should be no discomfort, to stop when we are uncomfortable. But the discomfort we feel when we're doing a challenging workout is an important part of the strengthening process." -Jim Afremow, The Champion's Mind: How Great Athletes Think, Train, and Thrive

                      hectortrojan


                        Run every day.

                         

                        Sounds counter intuitive, but it really seems to work for me.  Maybe I've just been really lucky as my only real running injury has been plantar fasciitis and when it was all said and done I'm pretty sure that was a result of changing my shoes that I wear at work rather than running.

                         

                        Of course I've worked up to this over a couple years before I started my first running streak, so this isn't something you would want to do overnight, but I do think the "rest days" are overrated if not actually less beneficial than a recovery run day.

                         

                        Maybe walking during your days off from running would help.

                         

                        What kind of injuries have you had?

                         

                        I had metatarsal injury.

                         

                        I remember you as a regular member in sub 2:00 HM. In 9/2012 I decided to run a HM in 3/2013 and wanted to do it under 2 hr. I started my training in 9/12. At that time I was not running even 10 miles/week and I ramped upto 50 miles/week by 2/2013. At that time I got injured, but got running bug. So instead of stop running till I fully recover, I would run on the days I feel good and would take off days when I feel pain. It lasted for few months and I finally decided to take it easy after that.

                        bap


                          I've been running for 9 years and I can't maintain over 40 miles a week without getting injured.

                           

                          That may explain why my marathon PR is half an hour slower than the predicted time based on my 5K PR.

                          Age 52

                          2016 Targets - 100 - 13.2s, 400 - 62s, 800 - 2:30, Mile - 5:40

                          hectortrojan


                            I've been running for 9 years and I can't maintain over 40 miles a week without getting injured.

                             

                            That may explain why my marathon PR is half an hour slower than the predicted time based on my 5K PR.

                             

                            What is your average weekly mileage? How much is it in terms of time?

                            In terms of time, how long is your very long run/races?

                              I recommend you run with good form, which starts with running with good posture, and actually starts with doing everything with good posture.

                               

                              Do what you need to to keep your core strong and stable and maintain full mobility in your hips.

                               

                              Run a lot mostly easy, sometimes fast.

                               

                              Pay attention to recovery and learn what types of active recovery your body responds to.

                               

                              Get plenty of sleep.

                               

                              Learn to listen to your body and be wary of the advice you get from people on the internet.

                              Runners run.

                                I recommend you run with good form, which starts with running with good posture, and actually starts with doing everything with good posture.

                                 

                                Do what you need to to keep your core strong and stable and maintain full mobility in your hips.

                                 

                                Run a lot mostly easy, sometimes fast.

                                 

                                Pay attention to recovery and learn what types of active recovery your body responds to.

                                 

                                Get plenty of sleep.

                                 

                                Learn to listen to your body and be wary of the advice you get from people on the internet.

                                 

                                POTD.

                                Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

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