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Anesthesia, wisdom teeth, and low heart rate (Read 89 times)

SillyC


    Hey there!

     

    Has anyone had their wisdom teeth removed with sedation?  Was low heart rate a problem?  Mine is 42 bpm.  I'm going next week to get my wisdom teeth extracted, and was really hoping to get at least nitrous for it.  But a (running) friend of mine freaked me out - he just told me his surgery got rescheduled because the nurses freaked about his low heart rate and refused to put him under until he was "cleared by cardiology".

     

    What can I expect?

     

    Thanks folks.  If this helps, I'm old - 38.  It's going to be done at one of these places that does outpatient surgery.  We're a few buildings over from a real hospital.

      Hey there!

       

      Has anyone had their wisdom teeth removed with sedation?  Was low heart rate a problem?  Mine is 42 bpm.  I'm going next week to get my wisdom teeth extracted, and was really hoping to get at least nitrous for it.  But a (running) friend of mine freaked me out - he just told me his surgery got rescheduled because the nurses freaked about his low heart rate and refused to put him under until he was "cleared by cardiology".

       

      What can I expect?

       

      Thanks folks.  If this helps, I'm old - 38.  It's going to be done at one of these places that does outpatient surgery.  We're a few buildings over from a real hospital.

       

      As a runner with Bradychardia, you should be good to go.  BTW, you're not *old*, I'm 57, have a resting heart beat which hovers just above or below 40, and have had various procedures using one form of sedation or another; no issues and no flack from nurses.  If a nurse gives you crap about your heart rate, ask to speak to her boss.

      bap


        Tell them you're an endurance athlete (or more simply runner). If the nurse freaks out ask to see the doctor. They'll understand.

         

        I have a note saying "Resting Heart-Rate 39" in my medical insurance details and my online shoe wallet profile so, if I end up in hospital, they don't bring in the crash cart when I'm happily sitting up in bed drinking a cup of coffee.

        Age 52

        2016 Targets - 100 - 13.2s, 400 - 62s, 800 - 2:30, Mile - 5:40

          Tell them you're an endurance athlete (or more simply runner). If the nurse freaks out ask to see the doctor. They'll understand.

           

           

          ^This.  I had the "conscious sedation" (versed and valium) when I had mine out 15+ years ago.  I highly recommend it.

          Race Plan: 8/21/14 - Saunders at Rye Harbor 10K - Goal: Sub 60 ** 10/26/14 - Loco Half - Goal: Sub 2:15 (cutoff)

          Old Lady PRs: 5K 29:25 10/26/13 *** 10K ~1:01:30 4/27/14  1:05:37 1/1/14   ***  HS-CC PR: 5K 22:28

          SillyC


             

            ^This.  I had the "conscious sedation" (versed and valium) when I had mine out 15+ years ago.  I highly recommend it.

             

            Not offered, or I'd take that.  I can get versed and propofol, nitrious, or nothing.    I don't want the propofol so I think I'm going with nitrous.

             

            Was your heart rate an issue?

             

            The thing that's got me concerned is that this isn't the actual hospital.  It's a stupid dental surgery suite.

             

            And shipo, I'm old to be having my wisdom teeth out.

               

              Not offered, or I'd take that.  I can get versed and propofol, nitrious, or nothing.    I don't want the propofol so I think I'm going with nitrous.

               

              Was your heart rate an issue?

               

              The thing that's got me concerned is that this isn't the actual hospital.  It's a stupid dental surgery suite.

               

              And shipo, I'm old to be having my wisdom teeth out.

               

              I had nitrous when I had a wisdom tooth out when I was still a youngster in my 30's. The tooth extraction was no big deal, but the nitrous was AWFUL. Totally paralyzed me while leaving me completely conscious and lucid. I heard and felt everything little thing that went on, but was unable to move or speak. I'd be curious to hear what it was like for other's that have had nitrous, because my experience can't possibly be typical.


              Feeling the growl again

                Tell them you're an endurance athlete (or more simply runner). If the nurse freaks out ask to see the doctor. They'll understand.

                 

                 

                Yep.  It's not that low HR is an issue with the anesthesia.  It's that a heart rate that low in a non-endurance athlete can mean other serious problems.

                 

                I once had an ER nurse reach for the code alarm as she said "PLEASE tell me you are a marathon runner or something" after taking my pulse as 29.

                "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                 

                bap


                  I saw one episode of House where they called for the crash cart when the patient's heart-rate was 46. That freaked me out.

                   

                  A couple of beats slower and you will equal the world record for lo heart-rate.

                   

                  1. Guinness World Records also recognized the world record for the lowest resting heart beat on record: 27 bpm, belonging to Martin Brady (UK, b. 24 March 1969) who was tested at the Guernsey Chest and Heart Unit, Channel Islands, UK.

                     

                     

                    (Incidentally, the Channel Islands are not in the UK. They are Crown Dependencies).

                     

                  Age 52

                  2016 Targets - 100 - 13.2s, 400 - 62s, 800 - 2:30, Mile - 5:40

                  SillyC


                     

                    Yep.  It's not that low HR is an issue with the anesthesia.  It's that a heart rate that low in a non-endurance athlete can mean other serious problems.

                     

                    I once had an ER nurse reach for the code alarm as she said "PLEASE tell me you are a marathon runner or something" after taking my pulse as 29.

                     

                    Well, I know I'm not going to die.  I just want to get some damn anesthesia.  And I don't want them deciding that my heart rate is too low and I have to be ambulananced to the other hospital.

                     

                    My plan for after is to take a lot of pain pills and catch a matinee of Hotel Budapest.  Really looking forward to that.


                    Feeling the growl again

                      I saw one episode of House where they called for the crash cart when the patient's heart-rate was 46. That freaked me out.

                       

                      A couple of beats slower and you will equal the world record for lo heart-rate.

                       

                      1. Guinness World Records also recognized the world record for the lowest resting heart beat on record: 27 bpm, belonging to Martin Brady (UK, b. 24 March 1969) who was tested at the Guernsey Chest and Heart Unit, Channel Islands, UK.

                         

                         

                        (Incidentally, the Channel Islands are not in the UK. They are Crown Dependencies).

                         

                       

                      I guess it depends how you measure it.  Mine was a real, but one-time reading when I took a rest day after a very hard workout when I was in good shape.  Typically it is in the low 40s, IIRC high 30s during my best conditioning.

                       

                      Lance Drugstrong reportedly averaged under 30.

                      "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                       


                      Feeling the growl again

                         

                        Well, I know I'm not going to die.  I just want to get some damn anesthesia.  And I don't want them deciding that my heart rate is too low and I have to be ambulananced to the other hospital.

                         

                        My plan for after is to take a lot of pain pills and catch a matinee of Hotel Budapest.  Really looking forward to that.

                         

                        Run an interval workout, get in the car, and go get your HR measured.  Problem solved.

                        "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                         

                        SillyC


                           

                          Run an interval workout, get in the car, and go get your HR measured.  Problem solved.

                           

                          I think they monitor it throughout the procedure - i saw a rig for doing that when I was in the consultation.  So the scenario I'm worried about is they knock me out and my heart rate drops to 42.....  then it gets decided that we're having a medical emergency.

                          SillyC


                             

                            Lance Drugstrong reportedly averaged under 30.

                             

                            LOL - Drugstrong!

                              I was in an out-patient surgery center at age 62 getting ready, when an anesthesiologist unexpectedly came in.  Turns out the nurse had called for him when she saw my HR on the monitor before any medication was administered - it was 35 - he just asked a couple of questions, wrote a note on my chart and left, and I went to on surgery. Normally during the day at rest it's low 40's but less when sleeping.

                              "I can do 440 in 220"    Half Fanatic #846    "90% of running is half mental"    If I collapse, please pause my Garmin

                               

                                Hey Silly- any decent healthcare professional will take into account the fact that you are athletic.  Personally, when I am administering conscious sedation, a low HR in an endurance athlete would not concern me at all, as long as the blood pressure was normal.  A low HR in a sedentary person would prompt me to ask for a 12 lead EKG before proceeding with any kind of anesthesia.  If the 12 lead and blood pressure was normal (aside from the low HR, that is), I would still likely proceed, but would be sure to monitor the EKG tracing and blood pressure by closely during the procedure.  So... a low HR alone should not prevent you from having a bit of sedation.  Just make sure they know your medical and athletic history in advance, and monitor you throughout.  Good luck!

                                Back in the saddle, after six years off...

                                Spring 2013- 5k 24:15

                                Fall 2013- HM 2:00:01

                                2014 Goals: 

                                Stay healthy and uninjured... so much for that.

                                Fall HM.

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