Beginners and Beyond

1

Training in "Racing" shoes? (Read 80 times)

ninian


    Hey,

     

    I had no idea but when I started running back in April I picked up a pair of Saucony Grid Type A4 shoes on sale. After looking them up online tonight it appears they are a racing shoe. Up until now I didn't even know that "racing" shoes existed. I really like my current shoes, but they are also the only pair I have ever had to run regularly with so who knows, I might like others just the same.

     

    My question is, does it matter if I am training in a racing shoe? Should my everyday shoe be something a little heavier? For the record I never raced other than trying to beat my own times. I noticed they have a newer model, Grid Type A5 and all the reviews seems very positive so I was thinking of ordering these but wanted to get some insight in racing shoes, is it just a marketing gimmick to get people to buy multiple pairs?

    Adam_McAllen


    Beer-and-waffle Powered

      They are usually a lot lighter and have less support/cusioning than a normal training shoe (I have the A4 and they're quite light). I trained exclusively in racing flats for a few years and I think it was a mistake. Personally, I would train in trainers and race in flats (you'd need to do some workouts in them to get used to them).

      In the words of my late-coach : Just hang in there, relax... and at the end of a race anyone you see.....just pass them

      MJ5


      Chief Unicorn Officer

        I agree with Adam, but I have known some people who train in racing shoes without any issues. I guess it's probably not much different than going barefoot or minimalist--it's just a very light shoe without much, or any, support. Personally I need te extra support for higher mileage days, but everyone is different. The Grid Type A5 is my current race shoe, for what that's worth. If you haven't been injured, or don't feel achy or fatigued in your legs after training, it's probably not a big deal.

        Mile 5:49 - 5K 19:58 - 10K 43:06 - HM 1:36:54


        Muddling through

          It's not for everyone just as going minimalist is not for everyone. As a general guideline I'd say leave the racing shoes for racing and maybe some fast interval workouts and use a lightweight trainer or regular shoe which has more support and cushioning.

          2014 Goals: Run first trail ultra, first 100K, and see what I can do in a 24-Hour race

          happylily


            It's not for everyone just as going minimalist is not for everyone. As a general guideline I'd say leave the racing shoes for racing and maybe some fast interval workouts and use a lightweight trainer or regular shoe which has more support and cushioning.

             

            +1

             

            That's what I do. I have lifgtweight trainers for my LRs and easy runs and I use my racers for speedwork and racing. Although I have yet to use my racers for a marathon. I only use them for 5ks to HMs. But I think they'd be ok for 26.2 miles as well.

            PRs: Boston Marathon, 3:27, April 15th 2013

                    Cornwall Half-Marathon, 1:35, April 27th 2013

            4 years racing, 16 marathons, 16 BQs     

              I have Asics Nimbus at 11 ounces for easy and long runs, Mizuno Wave Ronin at 7 ounces for tempo runs and races longer than 5K and New Balance 5000 (I think that's the model #) at 3.5 ounces for track work and races 5K and shorter.

              Short term goal: 17:59 5K

              Mid term goal:  2:54:59 marathon

              Long term goal: To say I've been a runner half my life.  (I started running at age 45).

              ninian


                Thanks for the tips. I will try to find a good pair of trainers then, thinkin of sticking with Saucony as I have had a pretty good experience with them.

                Adam_McAllen


                Beer-and-waffle Powered

                  I think there can be a psychological effect as well. Even when I trained in flats, I still had a pair that I only wore for short races and track workouts... when I put those on it meant it was time to run fastBig grin.

                  In the words of my late-coach : Just hang in there, relax... and at the end of a race anyone you see.....just pass them


                  delicate flower

                    I do all my runs in racing flats (New Balance 1400) simply because the shoes are just so damn comfortable.  I've been tearing through them quickly though (<250 miles) so I'll probably switch to a trainer for my longer runs once I return from the DL.  In my totally uneducated and inexperienced opinion, I just use a shoe that fits me and is comfortable, and in this case it just happens to be a racing flat.

                    proud sherpa

                    Adam_McAllen


                    Beer-and-waffle Powered

                       In my totally uneducated and inexperienced opinion, I just use a shoe that fits me and is comfortable, and in this case it just happens to be a racing flat.

                       

                      I don't think you can find anyone that would disagree with that.

                      In the words of my late-coach : Just hang in there, relax... and at the end of a race anyone you see.....just pass them

                      ninian


                        I do all my runs in racing flats (New Balance 1400) simply because the shoes are just so damn comfortable.  I've been tearing through them quickly though (<250 miles) so I'll probably switch to a trainer for my longer runs once I return from the DL.  In my totally uneducated and inexperienced opinion, I just use a shoe that fits me and is comfortable, and in this case it just happens to be a racing flat.

                         

                        This is basically what happened with me. Wanted to get into running and happened to be at a store that had a small shoe selection and they were on sale. However, I do find running around my area lately with road salt and chunks of broken ice that the thin shoe doesnt provide much barrier which can be painful at times. After doing some reading on training in racing flats I am just worried that I might do more harm than good in the long run.


                        delicate flower

                           

                          This is basically what happened with me. Wanted to get into running and happened to be at a store that had a small shoe selection and they were on sale. However, I do find running around my area lately with road salt and chunks of broken ice that the thin shoe doesnt provide much barrier which can be painful at times. After doing some reading on training in racing flats I am just worried that I might do more harm than good in the long run.

                           

                          That's a good point.  I used the 1400's for the one trail race I did.  I won't do that again.  Joking

                          proud sherpa