Drinkers with a Running Problem

Home Brewers... (Read 1574 times)


Prince of Fatness

    No, I've had that.  Let's go with that.  My only reservation is that I will be fermenting into May and am not sure how warm the basement gets.

     

    MTA:  Yeah, duh on me.  It is the original pils and I have had it many times.

    Semi-retired.


    A Dance with Monkeys

      Looking at some recipes right now, many call for a "Triple decoction mash."  I would ignore this and just steep the mash.

       

      There is this: "Budvar, Urquell and other Czech breweries are still using very undermodified two-row malt, a variety most American microbrewers would never touch. This mandates a decoction method of mashing to maximize the yields from the grain. Many U.S. micros use American, Canadian, or English two-row malts, that are more highly modified than their continental cousins, for the pilsners they brew."

       

      If you have an extra fridge, you can also stick the carboy in the fridge for the lagering period.


      A Dance with Monkeys

        A reasonable and straightforward recipe:

         

        Czech Pilsner
        (5 gallons, all-grain)

        This is a slightly drier version of pilsner from last year’s schedule. The previous recipe finished at 1.015 (3.7° Plato). This recipe ferments down to 1.010 (2.5° Plato).

        Ingredients

        • 6.5 lbs. two-row pilsner malt, 1° to 2° Lovibond
        • 1 lb. carapils malt, 2° Lovibond
        • 1 lb. cara-Munich malt, 10° Lovibond
        • 4.5 oz. Saaz whole hops (3.2% alpha acid, 12 AAUs):
            2.5 oz. (5.6 AAUs) for 90 min., 0.5 oz. (1.6 AAUs) for 30 min.,
            1.5 oz. (4.8 AAUs) at end of boil.
        • 2 pt. yeast starter of Wyeast 2278 (Czech Pils)
        • 2/3 cup corn sugar for priming

        Step by Step:

        Mash grain in 2.75 gal. of water for 60 min. at 149° F. Sparge with enough 168° F water to yield 5.75 gal. of wort.

        Total boil time is 90 min. At beginning of boil add 2.5 oz. Saaz and continue for 60 min. Add 0.5 oz. Saaz and boil 30 min. At end of boil, add 1.5 oz. Saaz. Whirlpool and cool to 45° F to pitch starter.

        Ferment at 40° F for 14 days then rack to secondary fermenter. Continue fermentation at 33° F until gravity is 1.010 (2.5° Plato).

        OG = 1.048 (12.0° Plato)    ABV =  4.5%
        Color =  4.2 SRM    Bitterness = 40 IBUs


        Prince of Fatness

          I don't have a fridge to stick the carboy in.  Temps will likely be 60 or so.  Would that be OK?  Also it sounds as though I will need to get it cold in order to pitch the yeast, no?

          Semi-retired.


          A Dance with Monkeys

            The yeast will work.  The final beer may simply not be as crisp in the mouth, but it will certainly be drinkable.  An alternative approach would be to bottle and then lager, placing the bottles in the fridge (if you have room).  Either cool or cold, it will work tho.  I say you go for it.


            A Dance with Monkeys


            Prince of Fatness

              I'm going to be a PITA and nix that idea for now.  How about a brown ale?  Looking at John Palmer's book that's the beer he covers in the all grain chapter.  Example.

               

              I can drink brown ale in the summer, and I would save some for the fall.  I love brown ales.

              Semi-retired.


              Prince of Fatness

                Dude, I love this stuff.  Do you think that it would be easy?

                 

                Click

                Semi-retired.


                A Dance with Monkeys

                  I thought about that.  What I don't like is the sheer volume of grain to be used.  Handling that amount of dry mass is tough when grinding, mashing and sparging.  You can do it, but a lighter beer will be easier for the first go.  Also, those particular hops are a bit harder to find.

                   

                  MTA: the dogfish is tougher.  The first example is easier and the hops are more common.  Reasonable.


                  Prince of Fatness

                    1) I have no grinder so I would have it ground for me when purchase, yes?

                    2) What do you have to watch for, clumps, scorching?  Just have to stir in well and keep stirring frequently? 

                     

                    MTA: I could take that recipe to the brewshop and have them help match it up as best possible.  They were helpful last time.

                    Semi-retired.


                    A Dance with Monkeys

                      1. Yes, absolutely

                      2. Scorching and temp control are the main issue; sparging through all that mass is the secondary one.

                       

                      The brewshop should be very helpful.


                      A Dance with Monkeys

                        One approach to temp control is to put the mash into your oven set to the right temp rather than try and do it stovetop.


                        Prince of Fatness

                          I plan on mashing in the kettle so yes, I figured that scorching would be the thing that I would have to really look out for.  As for sparging, I liked the idea of adding the water from a bottling bucket above the tun.  Also, I saw where you can insulate the bottom bucket in order to keep the temperature from dropping as quickly.  I have an idea for that and will keep you posted.

                           

                          Brown Ale it is.  I would like to have this ready to go early April at the latest.

                          Semi-retired.


                          Prince of Fatness

                            Cool.  My son asked for buckets at work.  None this evening but they will set aside a couple for him to get tomorrow.  Cheap is good but free is best.  I guess I'll be drilling holes this weekend.

                            Semi-retired.


                            A Dance with Monkeys

                              Sweet.  How you gonna add the spigot?