Low HR Training

1

Trail Running with MAF? (Read 658 times)

    Question:

     

    Is it better for MAF base building to run constant on mostly flat courses as compared to incline courses where my heart rate varies quickly?

     

    I ran this moring on some mountain bike trails.  Constant up and down with curves, roots, etc.  My heart rate varied much more than normal.  While trying for 125MAF I was frequenstly above and below.  I would hit 130 quickly then bring down to 118 on the decline.  Cannot run much faster on the decline because of the nature of the trail.

     

    Does anyone here have experience trail running and MAF?  Does it make a difference?  As long as I try to stay below MAF and slow down when my Garmin tells me I am too high, is it all the same?

    ___________

    Chris

      Question:

       

      Is it better for MAF base building to run constant on mostly flat courses as compared to incline courses where my heart rate varies quickly?

       

      I ran this moring on some mountain bike trails.  Constant up and down with curves, roots, etc.  My heart rate varied much more than normal.  While trying for 125MAF I was frequenstly above and below.  I would hit 130 quickly then bring down to 118 on the decline.  Cannot run much faster on the decline because of the nature of the trail.

       

      Does anyone here have experience trail running and MAF?  Does it make a difference?  As long as I try to stay below MAF and slow down when my Garmin tells me I am too high, is it all the same?

       

       

      I have no idea if it makes a difference but supposedly downhill running helps by allowing more turnover for the legs.

        I have no idea if it makes a difference but supposedly downhill running helps by allowing more turnover for the legs.

         

        The mountain bike trail I ran on is not a long downhill that allows any speed and leg turnover.Constant short bursts of up and down.

        ___________

        Chris

        rarian


          In my experience of trails I would never consider trying to MAF on them.  For MAFfing, the flatter the better.

           

          Question:

           

          Is it better for MAF base building to run constant on mostly flat courses as compared to incline courses where my heart rate varies quickly?

          Shondek


            In my experience of trails I would never consider trying to MAF on them.  For MAFfing, the flatter the better.

             I'm the same every 2 weeks I'm up the hills for 3 hours my maf is 125 but I just change the max on my watch to 145 .I make sure I have a long warm up and a very very long warm down,my friend gets bored after about an hour so i then go back maf and below mostly walking.I make sure the next 3 runs are well below Maf .Some say a couple of  really  really slow runs can cure an number of evils.Neutralize the acid(lactate) with alkaline (slow below maf runs)

             

            I am going to experiment by making my hilly trail run(tomorrow) my acid and walking( monday & tuesday)  my alkaline.


            Bacon Party!

              I run trails once or twice a week and have no problem keeping my heart rate where I want it... I just do it in ultra-running style, walking the uphills and running the downs and flats (or otherwise mixing it up so I stay under redline).

              The mountain bike trails available to me here are a constant series of short ups and downs - occasionally, it can be a bit irksome to keep changing pace so frequently.

              Learning to push the downhills enough to keep the heart rate "up" (or from dropping too too far) is a nice challenge - you can quickly become proficient in fancy footwork over technical terrain which will serve you well in trail races.

              Liz

              pace sera, sera

                I run trails once or twice a week and have no problem keeping my heart rate where I want it... I just do it in ultra-running style, walking the uphills and running the downs and flats (or otherwise mixing it up so I stay under redline).

                The mountain bike trails available to me here are a constant series of short ups and downs - occasionally, it can be a bit irksome to keep changing pace so frequently.

                Learning to push the downhills enough to keep the heart rate "up" (or from dropping too too far) is a nice challenge - you can quickly become proficient in fancy footwork over technical terrain which will serve you well in trail races.

                 

                 I am going to limit my mountain bike trail running to 1-2 times every couple of weeks.  Once I build a better base I may run more trails as my dog loves it.

                ___________

                Chris

                  Learning to push the downhills enough to keep the heart rate "up" (or from dropping too too far) is a nice challenge - you can quickly become proficient in fancy footwork over technical terrain which will serve you well in trail races.

                   

                   

                  yeah, that part is pretty cool. especially if you can get to the point where your quads don't get busted. Smile

                   

                  I can do downhill running at 6:30-7:00 min/mile pace (6:30 asphalt, 7:00 trails), faster than that and quads will complain, but I hope to train them to be more resilient. (they used to be a lot weaker)

                  mananingot


                    Just keep your HR below recommended MAF. If you're new to trail running it takes time to get used to the change in rythm of running up (usually walking) and down a hill, technical trails.

                     

                    I've found out that running trails uses up more muscles as you use different muscle group combinations when running up and down hills or running a rocky path.

                     

                    Running downhill, when you're not used to it will initially increase you HR. But when you've developed your upper quads after a few downhills, HR will be lower or pace would be much more controlled.

                     

                    Good luck!