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Does the Tragedy in Boston Change You? (Read 87 times)


Le professeur de trail

    Am I alone in finding that I now have a strong desire to try to qualify for Boston?

     

    I swore off road marathons after a few failed attempts to BQ and now, damn, I really want to go run Boston.

     

    I grew up not far from the start of the marathon and even as a small girl, the marathon was significant. As a pudgy, MTV-watching pre-teen slug I remember watching coverage of the marathon and wondering if that could be me one day. So maybe it is nostalgic, hometown pride or whatever, but I want to run it someday soon.

     

    But - that said - as a mom of 3 small children very close to the age of the boy who was killed - I'd just as soon have my family off doing something else. You can't predict random acts of violence and you can't control EVERYTHING around you. You'll hide under a rock or build a fortified underground bunker and lock your family in it if you let yourself dwell on all the things that can kill you or your children.

     

    So, does it change me? Not in a dramatic change of behavior kind of way, but it makes me feel less guilty about not travelling to races with my kids..

     

    I have a bit of that desire more so now to try and qualify one day.  I had dismissed it but I love the spirit of Boston and New England that they will come back stronger.

    Where did you grow up? I grew up just east of Worcester.  Going back next weekend to help get my parents house ready to sell.  It will be kind of weird - potentially the last time I see the house I grew up in.  But my heart will always be in New England.

    Deltarose


      Boyjame - probably very near you. Born in Worcester, raised in Shrewsbury.


      Occasional Runner

        Why else would one take action to mitigate any perceived risk?

         

        To preserve safety? I don't buckle my seatbelt out of fear, I do it as an extra safety measure. Your logic assumes all cautious acts are driven by fear. I can't agree with that.

        jamezilla


        Follower of Forrest

          Why else would one take action to mitigate any perceived risk?

           

          This was my gut-reaction also.  If you start diving into lace_up's question, it turns into a philosophical question...it depends on your definition of fear.

           

          Decisions are based on perceived risk vs. perceived reward.  Fear is an emotion that is associated with perceived risk.  If you want to attribute all perceived risk to "fear", I'm sure you could make a good case for that.  If you want to reserve the term "fear" for only high degree of perceived risk, I'm sure you could make a good case for that also.

           

          Emotions are tricky.

          6/21 - Manitou's Revenge 54mi

           

          A man may never run the same trail twice for it is not the same trail and he is not the same man


           


          Le professeur de trail

            Boyjame - probably very near you. Born in Worcester, raised in Shrewsbury.

             

            Yup very close. I grew up in the small town of Berlin - nestled in between Clinton, Boylston, Shrewsbury, Hudson and Northboro.

            cookiemonster


            Connoisseur of Cookies

               

              To preserve safety? I don't buckle my seatbelt out of fear, I do it as an extra safety measure. Your logic assumes all cautious acts are driven by fear. I can't agree with that.

               

              Why can't you agree with that?  Why do you buckle your seat belt as a safety measure?  Out of fear of not getting hurt in case of an accident?  Out of fear of getting pulled over and getting a ticket?  Or just because it's the cool thing to do?  Yes, you're doing it to be safe.  But what's driving your safety consciousness? If you weren't afraid of the possible outcome for not taking the safety route then you wouldn't have motivation to be safe.

               

              Or, as I think Jamezilla is arguing, we recognize the fear but are able to justify to ourselves the risk of a negative outcome is worth the benefit of engaging in a questionably risky activity.

               

              Fear is a basic human emotion with multiple levels.  There's nothing wrong with identifying fear as a motivation to do or not do something.  And that fear doesn't have to be one that leaves an individual trembling in a corner paralyzed with inaction.  That people are able to recognize their fears, justify the actions involved, balance the risk/benefit assessment of an issue and still move forward keeps us going both individually and as a society.

               

              People are so afraid to use and say the word "afraid".  They're especially afraid to say that they as an individual are afraid.  I don't know if it's a machismo thing or what it is.  But there's nothing wrong with reasonable fear (which is open for further definition) until it bogs down an individual to the point of inaction or paranoia.

              ***************************************************************************************

               

              "C" is for cookie.  That's good enough for me.

              Holden McGruyen


                This topic kicks the shit out of "mayo or Miracle Whip."

                I'm Holden McGruyen. Would you like to join me?

                LB2


                  No. I have no interest in running on the road anymore than I have to, and I don't like large crowds. However, the bombings have nothing to do with it, and if I had a goal to run Boston, I would not be deterred by this tragic event.

                  LB2


                  Ultra Cowboy

                    No. I have no interest in running on the road anymore than I have to, and I don't like large crowds. However, the bombings have nothing to do with it, and if I had a goal to run Boston, I would not be deterred by this tragic event.

                     

                    +1 Well said.

                    I'm a rambler, I'm a gambler, I'm a green lumber handler, I'm a gypo from Pelican Bay....

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