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snow shoe running vs. running shoe running. (Read 34 times)

Gator eye


    Got a pair of sherpa snow shoe from a garage sale last spring and itching to try them out, the snow is there I'm just waiting for the weekend.

    How much harder is running in snow shoes compared to trail running in general?

     

    What's going to start hurting when I over do it?

     

    Any pointers or tips for a first timer?


    Refurbished Hip

      Depends on the type and depth of snow.

       

      Just strap them on and go for it.  I would suggest running for time opposed to mileage.  Try not to kick your ankles, too.

      FTYC


      Faster Than Your Couch!

        Like Mandy said.

         

        Avoid very steep uphills and downhills, they are not fun with snowshoes. Flats and gently rolling hills are most fun.

        I usually feel my core muscles, lower abdominal muscles, and thigh muscles hurting first, but never had any overuse issues.

         

        I also get hot sooner, but when I need to walk longer stretches, it's good to have a light jacket (maybe tie it around your waist when running).

         

        Just enjoy and find your own way, it's supposed to be fun!

        Run for fun.

          +1 to what's been said.

           

          If those are regular snowshoes, not running snowshoes, you might find it a little more challenging than running snowshoes - BUT you'll be able to handle deeper snow.

           

          Definitely go by time and build gradually, just like when you were new to running. I run/walk in ss more than I run/walk normally.

          "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog
          NorthernHarrier


            Not sure if when you say "Sherpa" that you acquired an old pair of the original snowshoes made quite awhile back. Basically the first so called modern style that slowly started the transformation to the quality tech shoes out there. That company went defunct awhile back. There are companies now using the name "sherpa" to desiginate a model or whatever. If you got yourself an old original pair--very cool. They were very expensive back then.

             

            Anyway I would probably just start walking about for a bit before running just to get a feel and slowly get after it. If you start out too fast and get a little ahead of yourself you may just do a face plant. So you're asking what will start hurting--just your pride.

             

            It will all come along quite naturally in no time.  Steep downhills in deep soft powder are probably the only problem along with a side traverse of steep terrain.

             

            Your  knees and quads may feel it at first.

             

            The most fun is tipping over in 4' of snow and not being able to get back up.  My most fun on snowshoes--had sex with my wife on snowshoes out in the Nine mile forest near Wausau back when I was young. I was a victim.   (I know, tough visualization)

              Great timing!

               

              the university I work at rents snowshoes through their outdoor rec program. I've reserved a few pairs for me and my 7 y.o. Daughter to try out this weekend.

               

              Do any of you use ski poles with the snowshoes? Or are they useless?

                Great timing!

                 

                the university I work at rents snowshoes through their outdoor rec program. I've reserved a few pairs for me and my 7 y.o. Daughter to try out this weekend.

                 

                Do any of you use ski poles with the snowshoes? Or are they useless?

                I generally don't use poles when running since I'm too uncoordinated. Wink

                 

                I will use telescoping (3-piece) poles if hiking on rough terrain (like yesterday). Grades started near gently rolling at 10% and eventually reached 20 to 30%. If in doubt, I'll take one or two of them in the collapsed position in my pack, and use them if needed (or put them away if not needed).

                 

                If you're just renting, it's not a big deal, but if you were buying poles, look at ones with neoprene or cork grips since they're warmer. Also ones where the grips are a little bit longer so you can adjust hand position on them whether they're uphill or downhill side.

                 

                But most places where you'd be able to run, esp. with a 7 yo, you probably wouldn't need poles. Using poles for snowshoe hiking can provide a little bit more exercise for the upper body.

                 

                Have fun!

                "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog
                Gator eye


                  Are you guys using regular running shoes or do you use a leather or rubber boot?

                   

                  My target speed is slow to fast walking.

                  mtwarden


                  running under the BigSky

                    running is snowshoes is mucho work, even in "running" snowshoes- if you have a very packed surface it becomes easier, if it's deep powder you're in for it Big grin

                     

                    when I'm hiking in them, I use poles- they help with balance going over obstacles and steep ground- running, like AK, I don't think I'm coordinated enough Smile

                     

                    when running I just use my trail shoes, the binding on running snowshoes allow easy use of running shoes- your feet stay plenty warm moving along-no worries there; when hiking I usually use a mid-height gortex boot, in really cold I have an insulated pair of hikers

                     

                    for running I try to find surfaces that are more packed; I've often gone out hiking w/ my snowshoes just to pack down a trail for running Smile

                                                                               2014 

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                    NorthernHarrier


                      Gator- I've run in them in the past and have done several races but in reality like I have said on here in the past, I'm not all that keen on snowshoe running. I'd just rather run with microspikes on trail or the roads during the bad winters.  My kind of snowshoeing is backcountry and breaking trail thru the wild stuff.  So if I am running on packed trail standard trail running shoes are fine but they will become wet. This is one of the few times where gore-tex running shoes are good. For backcountry unbroken trail I have a couple different gore-tex hunting style boots I wear and depending on conditions I may wear gators and use poles.

                      FTYC


                      Faster Than Your Couch!

                        Like others, I use poles for balance over obstacles, or on those very steep hills. I mix walking with running, and I love to run through the deep snow with the snowshoes, but it is very exhausting. I am not sure if I have ever done a whole mile continuously running like that. I use running shoes, road or trail, whichever shoe is dry when I pull it out of the closet. They get wet, though, but I've never had frozen toes. And as snowshoeing is more exhausting than running, and slowe, it might be a good idea to bring along some extra food if you are planning on a longer route.

                        Run for fun.

                        TrailTromper


                        Pete

                          Personally I find for the conditions I use them in regular backcountry snow shoes work better than running ones.  I just slow down and don't go as many miles.  I have never used poles with them myself.

                           

                          Oh and yeah regular running shoes and gaiters.

                          TrailTromper 

                          Parkville MD