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Related to shoe mileage discussion...brand longevity? (Read 680 times)


Needs more cowbell!

    Seeing as how it appears that I may be one of those runners who wears out shoes a little prematurely, I was wondering if there are certain brands that seem to last longer than others. I have been wearing New Balance, mostly because I need wide shoes and won't ever run into issues finding a shoe that fits my need and is wide enough as long as I stay with NBs (and I have been very happy with the 2 pair I have had, though both seem to have led to increasing achey knees, shins, and calves by ~250 miles. I recall that when I replaced my last pair of shoes that my various aches and pains were eliminated almost immediately). Would I likely have shoes last longer (in terms of cushioning and support) with a different manufacturer, or is my running style/mechanics the biggest determining factor here? I'd be open to try other brands in the future, but am not eager to have my selection so limited by available widths. I also really love my current shoes (aside from the price tag, ouch!), so I'm not sure I am eager to experiment unless there's a strong chance that I can stay in a shoe for at least another 100 miles before needing to replace them. k

    I shoot pretty things! ~

    '14 Goals:

    • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

    • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

      This might be of interest. I can personally vouch for the Pegasus. Not my favorite shoe for my feet, but at 600 miles they're still just fine: http://orthopedics.about.com/od/sportsinjuries/tp/durable.htm And you might find this interesting, too. Both links are from actual podiatry sources, rather than shoe companies or running sources all with a vested interested in convincing you that you need new shoes: http://www.epodiatry.com/running-shoes.htm I think this from that second link is a lot closer to the truth:
      As a general rule, you should be able to get up to 1000km from a running shoe.
      E-mail: JakeKnight2002@aol.com
      -----------------------------

      Mile Collector


      Abs of Flabs

        The Nikes I used to wear last about 300 miles. I almost made it to 500 miles with my Saucony. The Nikes were much lighter because they were made of foam, which would explain why they didn't last as long.
          I used to run in Sauccony's. Grid Trigon Rides. I really liked running in them but at about 250 miles all the aches and pains started. New shoes, pain gone. Since then I've been running mostly in Mizuno Wave Elixer's. I just realized that I've got 317 miles logged on them so far and I probably had a good hundred miles or so on them before I started keeping track. I've been thinking it was about time for new shoes. Wink Teresa
            I've found more variation between models than between makes. In my experience, really simple, neutral shoes (like the Nike Pegasus, Asics Landreth, New Balance 755) last forever. The more stability and structure built into the shoe, the quicker they will break down.

            Runners run.


            Needs more cowbell!

              =I really liked running in them but at about 250 miles all the aches and pains started. New shoes, pain gone.
              That's exactly what I found with my first pair of shoes (NB 845) and my 1222s seem to be following the same course, though I like them more than the 845s. I will be interested to see how my recent aches and annoyances fare after my new shoes arrive--though I am not eager to wear them with our current weather, which is a nasty, snowy mess.
              I've found more variation between models than between makes. In my experience, really simple, neutral shoes (like the Nike Pegasus, Asics Landreth, New Balance 755) last forever. The more stability and structure built into the shoe, the quicker they will break down.
              Ahhh...that makes sense. Both of my shoes have been stability models, with my current ones offering a pretty high degree of stability. My 1222s are also designed to offer the highest degree of cushioning in any stability shoe NB makes--which makes them amazingly comfortable, but I have a feeling it also makes them pretty short-lived. And I believe both of the shoes I have had have also been marketed as "lighter-weight" models. I know my 845s were pretty light. Might a heavier-weight stability shoe last a little longer? As much as I love my 1222s, they aren't cheap ($135 full retail and because I need wides I have a hard time finding them for less than $105). I'd not mind a heavier shoe that lasts a little longer and costs a bit less. And speaking of the midsole creases that Jake's second article referred to, I definitely see some of that on the inside edge of the forefoot and heel. k

              I shoot pretty things! ~

              '14 Goals:

              • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

              • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

                I've found more variation between models than between makes. In my experience, really simple, neutral shoes (like the Nike Pegasus, Asics Landreth, New Balance 755) last forever. The more stability and structure built into the shoe, the quicker they will break down.
                That is indeed the smartest thing I've heard in the discussion. I don't see any reason the basic shoes can't last a helluva lot longer than most people suggest; but I'd guess that the more complex the shoes, the quicker something can break down. I'd guess that this is actually a very different conversation for people with pretty normal feet versus people with "special needs" feet. And yes, I just coined a new phrase. "Special needs" feet. They take a short yellow bus to the shoe store.
                E-mail: JakeKnight2002@aol.com
                -----------------------------


                Needs more cowbell!

                  That is indeed the smartest thing I've heard in the discussion. I don't see any reason the basic shoes can't last a helluva lot longer than most people suggest; but I'd guess that the more complex the shoes, the quicker something can break down.
                  Kinda like a car. My old Ford Escort is bombproof, as is my hubby's ancient '89 Civic (well, bomb-proof, but not rustproof, poor baby...). One thing I was wondering, since all of the creasing in my midsoles is on the inside edges of the shoes, does that point to pretty strong pronation? I've definitely been very happy in my shoes and they are designed for moderate to severe overpronators. My last pair of shoes--which I liked, but not as much--are touted as for "mild to moderate pronation."

                  I shoot pretty things! ~

                  '14 Goals:

                  • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

                  • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)


                  Needs more cowbell!

                    Interesting...I was just reading the reviews on RRS for my current shoes and one of the few criticisms was that they lose their cushioning relatively fast. The model that one reviewer highly recommended as an alternative just happens to be the same one that was my second choice (857) when I was fitted at the Grand Rapids NB store back in early Sept. He claimed that the stability of those is as good and the cushioning more durable, for whatever reason...and they are at least $30 cheaper, which is a bonus. I know that's a heavier weight shoe, too. I'm guessing part of why the 1222 is more expensive is that it's a lighter-weight shoe and it has a few other features that are missing on the 857 (things I don't think I would miss too much, like the N-lock feature which helps in getting the laces snugger around the middle of the foot, but my feet are so shapeless and duck-like that I doubt that feature does much on my tootsies). Another question...how many shoe models does the average runner try before finding the "perfect" shoe? I think I'm getting close, but a perfect shoe for me shouldn't require forking over $100+ every 3 months. Just wait...I will finally find that elusive ideal shoe and the bastards will discontinue it in favor of some new-fangled model that will suck ass. Tongue k

                    I shoot pretty things! ~

                    '14 Goals:

                    • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

                    • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)