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I can't stop eating!!! (Read 2181 times)

nyny


    Hello,

     

    I've been running sporadically over the years between 3-5 miles a workout. I lost 30 lbs. recently by running but I stopped for a short time a couple of weeks ago (for various reasons) and since starting again, I can't stop stuffing my face. I never feel satiated. I must add that my running has increase, rather easily, from 5 to 6.75 miles. I run 2-3 day intervals a week with a day off in between. Day 1 is 4 miles (fast), day 2 is 6 miles (with hill) and day 3 is 6.75 miles (even tempo).

     

    My goal is to run faster but I realized I need to weigh less to do so. I currently weigh 178 lbs. (31% BF) and the number is growing despite the milage. Please help.

     

    Thanks,

    Amanda

      Amanda,

       

      When I started running, about four months ago, I had been dieting/losing weight/getting healthy for a few months.  My prior activities were hiking/backpacking and rock climbing--they got me outside and got my hear rate up, but nothing like running does!  When I started running, I was still around 200lbs, but that was a big improvement for me--I was 227 at the beginning of the year.

       

      I was able to control my appetite pretty well until I started running--the first two weeks, I gained weight.

       

      Then, I realized I needed to make sure I was getting the nutrients that I needed while getting myself to burn off fat.  Articles like this one were largely helpful to me, and got me to slow my runs down (though not always as much as I should slow down (and I'm pretty slow)).  That said, when I started to run mostly at a lackadaisical, conversational pace, the weight started falling off again.  I'm down to 178 now and still working at it.

       

      I find my appetite is more under control when I eat healthy: whole grains, lean meats, cheeses, yogurts, and lots of fruits and vegetables.  When I eat junk, as I did this weekend because friends wanted to eat out, I end up feeling like I'm starving all the time.

       

      The thing that I'd try first is slowing your runs down--you have a fast run, a hill run (hills are speed work in disguise), and a tempo run.  70%+ of your miles should be easy, easy miles--especially at first (says the newbie to the runner who probably has almost as much or more experience), and especially if you want weight loss.  Go too fast, and you're burning sugar/glycogen more than anything.  When you do them slower, you might find you can lengthen them--but listen to your body if you do!

       

      Hope that helps!

      "When a person trains once, nothing happens. When a person forces himself to do a thing a hundred or a thousand times, then he certainly has developed in more ways than physical. Is it raining? That doesn't matter. Am I tired? That doesn't matter, either. Then willpower will be no problem." 
      Emil Zatopek

        Recognize, too, that the East Coast has been enjoyed cooler weather lately.  Lower temps tend to cause an increase in appetite.

        “Everything you need is already inside.” -- Bill Bowerman

          Hey nyny, When start running, it's normal to have a surge in appetite and some weight gain. Don't sweat it too much.  Make sure you're drinking enough. 

          "If you have the fire, run..." -John Climacus


          Prince of Fatness

            Make sure you're drinking enough. 

             

            At least I know that I am doing something right.

            Semi-retired.

              Hello,

               

              I've been running sporadically over the years between 3-5 miles a workout. I lost 30 lbs. recently by running but I stopped for a short time a couple of weeks ago (for various reasons) and since starting again, I can't stop stuffing my face. I never feel satiated. I must add that my running has increase, rather easily, from 5 to 6.75 miles. I run 2-3 day intervals a week with a day off in between. Day 1 is 4 miles (fast), day 2 is 6 miles (with hill) and day 3 is 6.75 miles (even tempo).

               

              My goal is to run faster but I realized I need to weigh less to do so. I currently weigh 178 lbs. (31% BF) and the number is growing despite the milage. Please help.

               

              Thanks,

              Amanda

              We have a saying in Japan, and I'm assuming you live in the north hemisphere (NY?), that in the autumn, even horses get fat.  Fall is the harvesting season, some animals even get ready for a long winter by stuffing themselves...  So with or without running, foods taste good and your mother nature calls for good eating in the fall.  I have a picture of Naoko Takahashi, the 2000 Olympic marathon champion and the first woman to break 2:20 in the marathon, right before Sydney Olympics (well, I shouldn't say "right" before...a few years before).  She looked visibly, well, well-fed.  She was known to eat a lot--like 50 pieces of sushi!!  Of course, she was known to run a lot too--like up to 70km a day!!  Her coach was very good about letting go loose for a while and then get tight again.  The point is; in order to run fast, you need a good big solid "foundation".  It's aerobic foundation and you build that by going far and the only way you can go far is to slow down enough.  And you can't go far and stuff yourself a lot with all these aerobic mileage is to stuff yourself with good energy ("good energy" doesn't mean potato chips or chocolate cake, however).

               

              There certainly is some level of self-discipline involved when we talk about "can't stop eating!"  But it may very well be that your body is craving for food for whatever the reason.  Learn to identify the difference but don't be too alarmed just because mother nature is calling for some good food.  And learn to slow down and go further as well so you'll be running fast when you're good and ready in the spring.


              I've got a fever...

                Running tends to stoke your appetite, especially hard workouts, and you end up eating more, often to the point where you gain weight despite the running.  In other words, running can trick you into eating more calories than you really need.  Hunger's a bitch that way.  A couple of numbers to keep in mind:

                 

                 

                • You can calculate your BMR (basal metabolic rate) which is the bare minimum number of Calories your body would need to function for 24 hours in bed.  If you multiply that number by 1.1 or 1.2, you have the number of calories you use on a normal daily basis (i.e. being up and about, not laying in bed).   Assuming for example, that your BMR is 1600, 1600*1.2 = 1920.  In that case, if your NET daily Calorie intake is less than 1920, you will lose weight.  Above 1920, you gain weight.

                Notice I said net calories.  That's where running comes in.  On a day where you run 5 miles, you burn 675 Calories.  So you could eat 2595 Calories that day and break even once you subtract off the 675 from your run.

                 

                I'm not saying you need to start counting calories, but a basic awareness of how many you need vs how many you burn might help.  In defense of counting calories, I dropped 30 lbs in 2 months by counting calories using http://www.myfitnesspal.com and their free iPhone app.  I'm a longtime poster here, so people can attest that I'm not a shill that just popped in to pimp that website.  

                 

                You might want to count your calories and your exercise for couple of weeks to figure out where your eating weakness is.  Mine is snacks -- my regular meals aren't too bad, but I snack a lot.  And when I stay up late, I keep on eating, often turning a weight loss day into a weight gain day in the eleventh hour.

                 

                Good luck!

                On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.

                  Eat in the morning - a good breakfast should help to keep hunger at bay during the day. Also eat a decent lunch. Don't eat so much in the evening. Keep a fruit bowl on your desk - if you're really hungry eat some fruit. Make sure that you're not thirsty - some people confuse thirst and hunger. Don't overdo your running pace, intense exercise can make you really hungry. Do other exercise whenever you can. Cycle to work, walk places, take the stairs instead of the elevator etc. etc.

                    protein girlfriend!

                    xor


                      I know I've said that.

                       


                      A Saucy Wench

                        I know I've said that.

                         Of course you have

                        I have become Death, the destroyer of electronic gadgets

                         

                        "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - dd, age 7


                        I'm back!

                           

                          • You can calculate your BMR (basal metabolic rate) which is the bare minimum number of Calories your body would need to function for 24 hours in bed.  If you multiply that number by 1.1 or 1.2, you have the number of calories you use on a normal daily basis (i.e. being up and about, not laying in bed).   Assuming for example, that your BMR is 1600, 1600*1.2 = 1920.  In that case, if your NET daily Calorie intake is less than 1920, you will lose weight.  Above 1920, you gain weight.

                          Notice I said net calories.  That's where running comes in.  On a day where you run 5 miles, you burn 675 Calories.  So you could eat 2595 Calories that day and break even once you subtract off the 675 from your run. 

                           

                          I think a better way to count this is not to assume a fixed amount > BMR that you will burn, but rather to count net calories per mile run -- closer to 112. See  How Many Calories Are You Really Burning? .

                           

                          Ultimately BMR -- or rather, your effective daily burn rate, sans running -- is best determined empirically, by recording weight and calories, smoothing the weight curve, and observing the slope. Or more simply, make a best guess, see what happens, and adjust. 


                          old woman w/hobby

                            Running tends to stoke your appetite, especially hard workouts, and you end up eating more, often to the point where you gain weight despite the running.  In other words, running can trick you into eating more calories than you really need.  Hunger's a bitch that way.  A couple of numbers to keep in mind:

                             

                             

                            • You can calculate your BMR (basal metabolic rate) which is the bare minimum number of Calories your body would need to function for 24 hours in bed.  If you multiply that number by 1.1 or 1.2, you have the number of calories you use on a normal daily basis (i.e. being up and about, not laying in bed).   Assuming for example, that your BMR is 1600, 1600*1.2 = 1920.  In that case, if your NET daily Calorie intake is less than 1920, you will lose weight.  Above 1920, you gain weight.

                            Notice I said net calories.  That's where running comes in.  On a day where you run 5 miles, you burn 675 Calories.  So you could eat 2595 Calories that day and break even once you subtract off the 675 from your run.

                             

                            I'm not saying you need to start counting calories, but a basic awareness of how many you need vs how many you burn might help.  In defense of counting calories, I dropped 30 lbs in 2 months by counting calories using http://www.myfitnesspal.com and their free iPhone app.  I'm a longtime poster here, so people can attest that I'm not a shill that just popped in to pimp that website.  

                             

                            You might want to count your calories and your exercise for couple of weeks to figure out where your eating weakness is.  Mine is snacks -- my regular meals aren't too bad, but I snack a lot.  And when I stay up late, I keep on eating, often turning a weight loss day into a weight gain day in the eleventh hour.

                             

                            Good luck!

                            amanda-

                             

                            this is what has worked for me also.  calories in vs calories expended.  

                            i haven't used the web site but for the past six years i have written every thing in a note book.  

                            i'm sure that the web site is easier but i like the note books.  

                             

                            i started in '05' weighing 180 pounds and have lost 55.  it took about two years to lose 50 but then i'm a slacker.

                            the last 5 pounds i've lost just recently.  

                             

                            there is no way i could have done it and kept it off with out being aware of my calories consumed vs energy expended.  

                            for me that requires actually writing it down and weighing on a daily basis.

                             

                            i mostly stick to healthy foods but nothing is totally cut out as long as i count the calories.  pizza, ice cream yum.

                             

                            other people are able to just reduce portion size while upping activity level.  i can't be trusted to do it that waySmile

                             

                            mta:  veggie packed broth based soups worked wonders for me the first year or so.  

                            steph  

                             

                            OCD  If you don't laugh...   

                              ... known to eat a lot--like 50 pieces of sushi!!  

                               

                              I have done this. 

                               

                                I have done this. 

                                 

                                Nobody can eat 50 pieces of sushi.

                                 

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