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adding swimming to my running (a little long sorry) (Read 1308 times)

    Okay here's a summary: I have completed 3 weeks of a 13 week learn to run program (plus day 1 of week 4 which is a recovery week). The last couple of weeks are in my log. I would like to add swimming as an additional workout (for now, twice a week) with an aim of early next spring doing a sprint-distance tri. (still Shocked of the bike right now...) Other details: I can swim. I have a worn rotator cuff in my right shoulder and swimming actually makes it feel better (just no backstroke!) so I was swimming a bit earlier in the year for that reason (and to burn calories etc.) I also have bad and severe carpal tunnel in both wrists and I'm not sure how swimming is gonna effect that. I see the surgeon in August so I can check it out then too. I went online to hopefully find a "learn to swim" along the lines of the learn to run. There are some workouts posted on http://www.trinewbies.com/ i.e. 10 beginner swim workouts covering 200 - 600 yards up to 8 advanced workouts and 4500 yards. The first day swimming for the beginner is 200 yards total. It will take me longer to walk to the pool! I guess I should approach it along the lines of the running right? Slow and steady to start? If I swim twice a week I'll be up to 600 yards in 5 weeks. Then I can go up a level. Basically - what do you think? Would I be setting myself up for failure/injury if I skip ahead? Any comments, suggestions, encouragement greatly welcome! Thanks!

    First or last...it's the same finish line

    HF #4362

      Congratulations on almost a month of your learning to run program! Like you I am kicking around the idea of an early spring sprint tri... or even possible one in the next 5 weeks. I've been swimming for the last 5 weeks or so. Like you, I can, or could at one point, swim not too bad. Also like you, i found the suggestions on trinewbies for training to be wayyyy too little. I started off doing very slow and easy 1000m-2000m swim days, around 45-60 minutes a session. I don't know about you, your fitness, and body/physical health, but I didn't have any problem jumping in like this. Listen to your body, if you're getting tired switch your stroke and/or take a rest. If you start getting sloppy because you're too tired you're probably wasting your time and energy. I would suggest following some of the swim drills that are on trinewbies.com, or elsewhere on the internet... everything I've been reading has said that unlike biking and running, quality not quantity of swimming is the key to improving efficiency/speed/endurance in swimming. I'm not much help... but was in a similar boat to you not too long ago. Best of luck with everything and keep up the good work and consistency! Biking is fun, so don't be scared... I just got a road bike 2 weeks ago and its great.
        I just jumped in and swam till I was tired. I didn't follow any plan. Once you get to the point where you can do a few 100 meters non-stop start adding some drills. You need to learn good technique early. Your speed won't improve very much if you have bad technique. Sparky is right about the quality over quantity for swimming.
        Son, when you participate in sporting events, it's not whether you win or lose; it's how drunk you get. -- Homer Simpson
          Thanks very much guys. I've printed out the first two schedules from trinewbies and I'll see how it goes tonight. I took some lessons last year actually and our local pool has a couple of very helpful guards and I'll be sure to ask if they can pay some attention...

          First or last...it's the same finish line

          HF #4362

            'kay I read the beginning swimming schedule from trinewbies.com. The first day was swiming 25 yards, stopping 10 seconds and repeating 4 times. The 7th day was 20 times so I just figured I'd start and see how many I could do. I did the 20 at least ... I lost track a couple of times (Hmm was that 15 or 17?) and I always went with the lower number so I'm not really sure. I have to figure out a good way of keeping track. thanks again

            First or last...it's the same finish line

            HF #4362

              You get used to counting. Once you get better and can do multiple lengths with no break I found it easier to count in meters instead of number of laps. 4 laps = 100m becomes second nature and you don't really have to count them. I just count in 100m increments and then just keep track of my sets so 5x400m instead of 80 laps.
              Son, when you participate in sporting events, it's not whether you win or lose; it's how drunk you get. -- Homer Simpson


              A Saucy Wench

                you can also for fairly cheap buy a lap counter at most pools. Speedo makes a pretty nice one that you wear like a ring and it will keep max min and avg split as well as # laps and total time. I would look at the beginning workouts kind of like drills in the middle of your workout if you can already swim more than that. Go to the pool..do 500 warmup. Do 4x25 really concentrating on form. Or on one weakness of your form or whatever. Rest. Repeat. It is really hard to focus on form for long, so while your endurance is way above the program use those intervals for that. When done, swim continuously again for whatever time you feel like swimming. Many places have 1 day swim clinics where they can evaluate your form and give you pointers.

                I have become Death, the destroyer of electronic gadgets

                 

                "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - dd, age 7

                  Thanks. It's funny. Sometimes (okay more than I'm willing to admit actually) I forget to KICK! I'm concentrating on breathing right and hitting the water right on my arm strokes then all of a sudden I think "I'm pretty sure my legs should be doing something! I'll definitely look for the lap counter from Speedo - sort of like a knitting counter? (no, I didn't just say that. Let me repeat, I started this whole running thing because I can't play hockey right now...definitely don't do anything so girly) Clowning around

                  First or last...it's the same finish line

                  HF #4362

                    Thanks. It's funny. Sometimes (okay more than I'm willing to admit actually) I forget to KICK! I'm concentrating on breathing right and hitting the water right on my arm strokes then all of a sudden I think "I'm pretty sure my legs should be doing something! )
                    You should use one of those floaty things that goes in between your legs (forget the technical term) while you're practicing your technique. This will allow you to focus on your arms and not worry about being distracted by the legs!


                    A Saucy Wench

                      not as uncommon as you might think. You can do kick drills and arm drills for the time too. Or do a few where you DO try to go fast without form degrading and see if you can find out what part of your form degrades first. Because I can work on form slow all day, and then the second the starting gun goes off I am back to thrashing about. Roll eyes

                      I have become Death, the destroyer of electronic gadgets

                       

                      "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - dd, age 7


                      Awesome

                        I know I'm piping in a little late, but I'd like to add that I swear by Triathlon Swimming Made Easy by Terry Laughlin. It saved my butt (and probably my wallet, since I ended up not hiring a swim coach) this past year. I don't know how you are with biking, but I wouldn't sweat the need to get the swimming up to a high level, especially not at the expense of trying to get better on the bicycle. Even a HIM only has a 1.2 (or so) mile swim, which is comparatively short compared to the bike/run distances. Any speed you gain in the water is not going to get you nearly as far as gaining speed on land will. Just a thought from someone who is terrible on the bike.
                          I know I'm piping in a little late, but I'd like to add that I swear by Triathlon Swimming Made Easy by Terry Laughlin. It saved my butt (and probably my wallet, since I ended up not hiring a swim coach) this past year. I don't know how you are with biking, but I wouldn't sweat the need to get the swimming up to a high level, especially not at the expense of trying to get better on the bicycle. Even a HIM only has a 1.2 (or so) mile swim, which is comparatively short compared to the bike/run distances. Any speed you gain in the water is not going to get you nearly as far as gaining speed on land will. Just a thought from someone who is terrible on the bike.
                          Thanks for the recommendation. I guess I better get over my Shocked of riding quick then eh?

                          First or last...it's the same finish line

                          HF #4362