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Crampons for running shoes? (Read 1374 times)

    When I'm a billionaire I will have my paved rail trail paths redone with a snow melt system underneath, that way I can run them year-round. k
    Or move to Iceland. My friend who lives there moved to an apartment complex that 'of course' has heated walkways. Nothing like geothermal energy. But days are short here and not much vegetation so maybe crampons are not such a bad idea. Ewa
    I would rather wear out than rust out. - Helen Klein You create your own universe as you go along. - Winston Churchill
      I have tried YakTraxx one season, it's true they do wear out even if I only wore them occasionally. I also fell once in the middle of an intersection because they got caught together somehow Undecided The next year I've switched to screws in my shoes. It works pretty good! I install them on a pair of shoes I just retired (or semi-retired). The only inconvenience is that, in the middle of a run, you can't change your mind and remove them or put them on. Here's a link that illustrates how to do it: http://www.skyrunner.com/screwshoe.htm


      Needs more cowbell!

        RunB, I just read about that recently. I also saw a suggestion that one use superglue to hold the screws in place better. I think I might have DH try this on my old shoes. How does it work if you are running on a mix of icy roads with patches of clear? Big grin k

        I shoot pretty things! ~

        '14 Goals:

        • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

        • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)


        Needs more cowbell!

          Oh, and YAY!!! Looking at the 10 day forecast and it looks like it will generally be warmer for a good stretch (granted, this is MI and it could easily change on a dime). I NEED a solid week of decent weather to help me get back into consistent runs. Heck, I'd just like for Dec. to not be the loss that Nov. was. Smile k

          I shoot pretty things! ~

          '14 Goals:

          • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

          • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

            There have been times when I've been tempted to try the screw shoe method and I still may at some point but I think you're really thinking too much about this. It's really not a huge deal when you get used to running on snow and ice. In the winter of '04 when I was training for Boston and running my highest mileage ever we had a really bad winter. January was a record month for snowfall with like 45 inches--our normal season average. It seemed like there was snow and/or ice every day from early December through mid-March that year. And cold too. There were probably a handfull of days that whole winter I didn't run outside with the vast majority of my running happening before sunrise. I had a few "oh jeeze!" moments but I actually fell down a grand total of once and that was while WALKING down my hill to begin a run. Runners run.

            Runners run.

              I think you're really thinking too much about this. It's really not a huge deal when you get used to running on snow and ice ... Runners run.
              Yup.
              E-mail: JakeKnight2002@aol.com
              -----------------------------

                How does it work if you are running on a mix of icy roads with patches of clear?
                I bet you put down a nice trail of sparks that makes you look like you're running really fast. Hey, did you noticed I used the quote thingy for the first time? Big grin Running's easy, posting on the Internet is challenging. My New Year's resolution is to figure out how to post pics without asking my fourteen year old to do it for me.

                The secret of life is honesty and fair dealing. If you can fake that, you've got it made.

                  Most snow conditions are fine to run on. Here in Montréal we often get a surface of packed snow that melts a bit and freezes again or gets a coat of freezing rain on top, or the worse, an uneven ice layer with a very thin layer of snow on top. Sometimes you can run on it, but sometimes you have almost no traction. Trying to run on it is very hard on the shins and ankles as you're always fighting for stability. It's not falling that I'm most afraid of, it's pulling something while trying to keep balance. So 90% of my runs in winter are ok without any traction aid. But sometimes, I have the choice between putting my screw shoes or staying inside. Last winter, we had a period that was so bad with ice that I just got a membership to a gym for a couple of months and did my runs on a treadmill. But I can't do more than 8 miles on a treadmill, I would go insane. For my long runs, I head out very early Sunday morning. I can then run in the middle of the street which is usually in better condition.


                  Needs more cowbell!

                    Most snow conditions are fine to run on. Here in Montréal we often get a surface of packed snow that melts a bit and freezes again or gets a coat of freezing rain on top, or the worse, an uneven ice layer with a very thin layer of snow on top. Sometimes you can run on it, but sometimes you have almost no traction. Trying to run on it is very hard on the shins and ankles as you're always fighting for stability. It's not falling that I'm most afraid of, it's pulling something while trying to keep balance.
                    That's the stuff! Falling doesn't scare me too much...aside from the fact that I bruise VERY badly (I'm what a surgeon of mine once called "a bleeder"--thin blood that makes a big hematoma), I am also short, so I don't have far to go (and have never had a broken bone, aside from my tailbone...good, sturdy, stocky bones). But I end up running very stiffly and unnaturally and it's not comfortable. I could do that for a few blocks here and there, but for 5+ miles it gets tiresome and takes the pleasure out of running, since my mind is entirely on staying upright, rather than just enjoying the ride. I have a history with shin splints and tight lower legs, anyhow, and have found that running on slippery terrain seems to make matters worse and more frequent. k

                    I shoot pretty things! ~

                    '14 Goals:

                    • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

                    • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

                    vicentefrijole


                      It's really not a huge deal when you get used to running on snow and ice.
                      I might be inclined to agree, since the roads here in Chicago (and Boston and other big cities, I suspect) are seldom left uncleared for very long.. BUT ZZ doesn't live in a big city, right? If they haven't cleared the snow off the road in awhile and it gets packed into a tight, slipperly layer, I can totally understand how that would be really annoying (if not dangerous) to run on. Also, as RunB has said, it depends on the quality of your snow, since some climates produce fluffy, harmless powder and others produce nasty, icy sleet. I remember the time a friend of mine came to visit from Philly and was amazed at how different our snow was in WI (it's a lot colder too). So do what you have to do ZZ.... if it's that bad, maybe you can find a gym with a month-long free trial? hehe. Big grin


                      Needs more cowbell!

                        I might be inclined to agree, since the roads here in Chicago (and Boston and other big cities, I suspect) are seldom left uncleared for very long.. BUT ZZ doesn't live in a big city, right?
                        Not unless 2k people constitutes "big." Wink
                        If they haven't cleared the snow off the road in awhile and it gets packed into a tight, slipperly layer, I can totally understand how that would be really annoying (if not dangerous) to run on. Also, as RunB has said, it depends on the quality of your snow, since some climates produce fluffy, harmless powder and others produce nasty, icy sleet. I remember the time a friend of mine came to visit from Philly and was amazed at how different our snow was in WI (it's a lot colder too).
                        Our snow quality is all over the map, too. Isn't it the Inuit who have something like 30 different words to describe snow, since all snow is not created equal? And being by the lake we get that wonderful "lake effect" monster. Our temps have a lot of bearing on the snow, as well as Lake MI water temps and how far out the ice goes (you get this, too, as do the folks in Buffalo, NY). We're only a couple of miles from the coast. Lately our snow type has been what is often described as "greasy." But the biggest problem is that some of the roads around me never really get plowed and as soon as they do they drift back over or they only are able to plow the top two inches, which really makes a slick, compressed layer underneath. Then they get driven on, which presses the snow down further, warms it up a bit, then it refreezes hard. Or they just dump sand and salt on it, so it gets slushy, then refreezes. This is why our car has $$ Blizzak Revos (mounted on cheap, durable steelies with no cosmetic covers to trap snow and ice) on it and not run-of-the-mill all-weather tires.
                        So do what you have to do ZZ.... if it's that bad, maybe you can find a gym with a month-long free trial? hehe. Big grin
                        Hmmm...I should see if the health club in town has any special holiday deals--I like that idea of scammin' a month off 'em! Wink k

                        I shoot pretty things! ~

                        '14 Goals:

                        • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

                        • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)


                        Dog-Love

                          Wow that's a long thread for snow running but the guy who recommended the Road Runners ice cleats has the best idea!. I have tried them all and I use those for all of my ice trail runs. You can even scale a steep icy incline with confidence. Yaktrax are fine for walking but feel horrible and don't work well on hills. Screws in your shoes work OK but those little spike in those slip on cleats are the way to go. And you can slip them off when you get to pure snow. I carry them around my waist for icy moments.
                          Run like you are on fire! 5K goal 24:00 or less (PR 24:34) 10K goal 50:00 or less (PR 52:45) HM goal 1:55:00 or less (PR 2:03:02) Marathon Goal...Less than my PR (PR 4:33:23)
                            That's good to know Crabby. I'd rather have something that can be easily put on or taken off, which is what's inconvenient with screws. It's hard to figure out what kind of traction you will have by just looking out the window, it all looks white to me. I will add them to my Xmas wish list and give them a try Wink .. Ronald


                            Needs more cowbell!

                              Wow that's a long thread for snow running but the guy who recommended the Road Runners ice cleats has the best idea!. I have tried them all and I use those for all of my ice trail runs. You can even scale a steep icy incline with confidence. Yaktrax are fine for walking but feel horrible and don't work well on hills. Screws in your shoes work OK but those little spike in those slip on cleats are the way to go. And you can slip them off when you get to pure snow. I carry them around my waist for icy moments.
                              Ahhh...that does make those ice cleats sound appealing. I have read that the Yaktrax can be tricky to get on and off. Those ice cleats look like they would offer a bit of wind and water protection, too. I think we're going to try the screws in an old pair of my shoes when I know I will be on roads that are almost entirely uncleared, but I may think about those cleats if we keep having consistent snow and cold temps and poor clearing of roads (luckily we're predicted to have 4-5 days of warmer temps, so the roads may improve a bit for a few days). k

                              I shoot pretty things! ~

                              '14 Goals:

                              • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

                              • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

                                Link was laready posted sorry

                                To paraphrase an old poster: Today is the first day of the rest of your training. It doesn’t matter where you started or how far you’ve come. Today is the day. Your training didn’t start 6 weeks ago. Your training started the last time you hit the road. John “the Penguin” Bingham Life is not tried, it is merely survived if you're standing outside the fire

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