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What are the best recovery methods after you have trashed your legs in a long race?? (Read 462 times)


Finally PRed!!!

    Here is the RT article by Magness on the subject:

    http://www.runnersworld.com/race-training/when-damage-good-thing

     

    I think Magness or someone had something about this possibly being detrimental because it messes up the body's natural recovery/adaption so you may actually hinder growth and recovery. I'll try to find a source.

     

    ETA: Not the exact thing I was looking for, but a good article about the subject:

     

    "[As Magness explained to her, “You want your body to learn how to recover on its own.”

     

    That theory runs counter to the pill-popping, ice-tubbing, massage-getting habits of most amateur athletes. We’ve become addicted to enhanced recovery, obsessed with erasing as quickly as possible the pain, fatigue, and inflammation that come from a hard workout. But some top scientists and coaches have adopted a new line of thinking: stress is a good thing, because it forces the body to adapt, repair itself, and come back stronger."]

     

    http://www.outsideonline.com/fitness/recovery/Stress-Tested.html

    PRs: 5K: 22:09, 10K:44:55, 15K: 1:10:35, HM: 1:42:49, M: 3:32:09

    zonykel


      You need to be well hydrated, but not over-hydrated as you suggest. Let thirst be your guide. Your body knows best.

      I may not know tons about running (newbee to the sport) but one thing I know is lactic acid build up (which may be rhabdomyolysis).  Make sure you are drinking WATER and lots of it.  Muscle breakdown releases toxins to the body.  The problem is in that the kidneys are only able to process so much of the toxins as they are "big" to be flitered.  Diluting the toxins (AKA lactic acid) helps "unclog" the filtering system so lactic acid can be processed better.  I cannot stress the importance of LOTS and LOTS and LOTS of water (at least double to triple the daily recommended amounts of eight 8 ounce glasses).  Did I mention drinking ALOT of water?  I would AVOID any NSAID products (Motrin, Aleeve, Excedrin).  If you need something in way of "medication pain relief" a LITTLE bit of Tylenol should not hurt.  If your urine is brown or excessively dark, you need to seek medical attention right away.  Hope this helps and I hope you are feeling better soon!   Smile


      I'm back!

        Rhabdomyolysis is something unrelated to lactic acid.  Yes, it involves by-products of muscle breakdown (myoglobin)  from extreme exercise and can damage the kidneys.  It is a very serious condition but is not likely to happen as a result of running, even from a hard run.  

         

        Nit, rhabdo is something all ultra runners have to be aware of. It definitely does happen. But very unlikely on marathon or shorter.

        gilbertholdings


          i find exercising stretches everything out the best.  maybe not full running to recover, but walks, light jobs, etc.

             "[As Magness explained to her, “You want your body to learn how to recover on its own.”

             

            That theory runs counter to the pill-popping, ice-tubbing, massage-getting habits of most amateur athletes. We’ve become addicted to enhanced recovery, obsessed with erasing as quickly as possible the pain, fatigue, and inflammation that come from a hard workout. But some top scientists and coaches have adopted a new line of thinking: stress is a good thing, because it forces the body to adapt, repair itself, and come back stronger."]

             

            http://www.outsideonline.com/fitness/recovery/Stress-Tested.html

             

            This may be true, and it makes logical sense to me, which is exactly why I don't take NSAIDS after long runs any more.  But, at the end of a marathon that you have peaked for when you really don't care what's beyond it, when you are "done for a while," who cares?  Under those circumstances 2-3 Alleve after the finish line are nice indeed (add a couple of beers with that and = very nice)....  I know it ain't "all natural".  Just sayin', in my sample set of 1 it's been very very effective at significantly reducing soreness.

            - Joe

            all running goals are under review by the executive committee.

              I may not know tons about running (newbee to the sport) but one thing I know is lactic acid build up (which may be rhabdomyolysis).  Make sure you are drinking WATER and lots of it.  Muscle breakdown releases toxins to the body.  The problem is in that the kidneys are only able to process so much of the toxins as they are "big" to be flitered.  Diluting the toxins (AKA lactic acid) helps "unclog" the filtering system so lactic acid can be processed better.  I cannot stress the importance of LOTS and LOTS and LOTS of water (at least double to triple the daily recommended amounts of eight 8 ounce glasses).  Did I mention drinking ALOT of water?  I would AVOID any NSAID products (Motrin, Aleeve, Excedrin).  If you need something in way of "medication pain relief" a LITTLE bit of Tylenol should not hurt.  If your urine is brown or excessively dark, you need to seek medical attention right away.  Hope this helps and I hope you are feeling better soon!   Smile

               

              Read up on hyponatremia before you get too carried away with the water. Tripling your fluid intake to "unclog the filtering system" does not sound like very good advice.

              zonykel


                 

                This may be true, and it makes logical sense to me, which is exactly why I don't take NSAIDS after long runs any more.  But, at the end of a marathon that you have peaked for when you really don't care what's beyond it, when you are "done for a while," who cares?  Under those circumstances 2-3 Alleve after the finish line are nice indeed (add a couple of beers with that and = very nice)....  I know it ain't "all natural".  Just sayin', in my sample set of 1 it's been very very effective at significantly reducing soreness.

                 

                More than just adaptations to training, you want to let your body heal itself.

                 

                by taking anti inflammatories, you are treating the symptom that's causing you pain. And iirc, taking NSAID after a marathon will impact your kidneys negatively.


                I'm back!

                  Here is the RT article by Magness on the subject:

                  http://www.runnersworld.com/race-training/when-damage-good-thing

                   

                  This is in line with what the Science of Sport guys (Ross Tucker and Jonathan Dugas) say in their book The Runner's Body.

                   

                  http://books.google.com/books?id=mUmFfVXceTUC&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q=doms

                   

                  Also with this except I just stumbled across:

                   

                  http://www.humankinetics.com/excerpts/excerpts/recent-research-provides-insight-into-muscle-soreness

                   

                  I never use NSAIDS, except after running a 100, when it is necessary.

                     More than just adaptations to training, you want to let your body heal itself.

                     

                    by taking anti inflammatories, you are treating the symptom that's causing you pain. And iirc, taking NSAID after a marathon will impact your kidneys negatively.

                     

                    Occasional use of NSAIDS for soreness is not the devil, people.  Twice a year after a marathon?  I'll take my chances, thank you very much.

                     

                    I'm not telling the dude to go pop NSAIDS after every long training run or interval workout.  Give me a break.

                    - Joe

                    all running goals are under review by the executive committee.

                    zonykel


                      I think there is a study that says you'll go BLIND if you look at NSAIDS after a marathon Wink

                       

                       

                      Occasional use of NSAIDS for soreness is not the devil, people.  Twice a year after a marathon?  I'll take my chances, thank you very much.

                       

                      I'm not telling the dude to go pop NSAIDS after every long training run or interval workout.  Give me a break.

                        Doc Lori- are you a doctor?

                        Are you a medical doctor?

                        I just ask because that sounds like a hell of a lot of water......

                        PBs since age 60:  5k- 24:36, 10k - 47:17. Half Marathon- 1:42:41.

                                                            10 miles (unofficial) 1:16:44.

                         

                          I think there is a study that says you'll go BLIND if you look at NSAIDS after a marathon Wink

                           

                           

                          Hmmm... I always thought that was caused by something else.  Now I know the real reason why I had to get reading glasses a couple of years ago!

                          - Joe

                          all running goals are under review by the executive committee.

                          mikeylikesit


                            One day post race walk slowly and for short distances. Do not do steps. Walking helps to flush the lactate. Two days post race take a day off. You may want a massage.  This too can help flush the legs.  Day 3 post race walk again.  By day 4 you should begin to feel slightly better.

                             

                            Using common sense is important.  However, I have seen what others consider common sense and am always surprised at what others do to recover. So I offer a generic recovery plan above.


                            HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer

                              One day post race walk slowly and for short distances. Do not do steps. Walking helps to flush the lactate. ..

                               

                              Sounds like you're confusing immediate post-race recovery with the following day.

                              It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.

                              jackfrost9p


                                 

                                Yup.  Healing muscles make use of a lot of water.  As they recover they release it.  I can put on 3-5#s overnight after a hard race.  It sticks around for about as many days.

                                 

                                I was recently wondering why I would always put on 4 or 5 pounds after the weekend's hard workouts... I was assuming I was eating more after the workouts, but was puzzled because 4 pounds of food seemed to be way too much... Good to know!

                                Marathon: 2:48:49 (Boston 2014) - Half: 1:22:11 (Berkeley 2013)

                                2x sub-24 100 mile finisher

                                Next: Big Sur Marathon - Blog: http://jbfinn.blogspot.com/

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