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What's your resting heart rate? (Read 346 times)

scappodaqui


rather be sprinting

    Just curious.  I got mine measured yesterday at about 36 (32 at one point, 39 at another), and the nurse was somewhat concerned, but from what I understand, that's fairly typical for a runner?  On the other hand, I know several accomplished--far faster than me--who have much higher heart rates.  I'm also not even that fit right now, barely running 30 mpw.  So I'm quite curious. Also very curious if anyone has experienced a change in heart rate after beginning to run.  My father, for instance, saw his drop from 75 to 53 without significant weight loss, which surprised me.

    PRs: 5k 19:25, mile 5:38, HM 1:30:56

    Lifting PRs: back squat 176 lb

      Comparing heart rates, resting or otherwise is meaningless.

       

      I can't say that I noticed a change in my resting heart rate after I began running again. I never paid much attention back then. I can say that I am at my worst fitness level in nearly 10 years and my resting heart rate is pretty much the same but my "easy" pace is much slower.


      Feeling the growl again

        Running enough will generally lower resting HR in an individual because as your heart strengthens and develops the ability to output more blood per beat as a result of training, it doesn't need as many beats to generate adequate circulation at rest.

         

        Comparisons between people, however, are totally meaningless.  Plenty of examples of elite athletes with both comparatively high and comparatively low resting HRs.

         

        I used to get to 29-30 pretty regularly; the lowest it was ever officially measured was 26, on a rest day after a hard workout, in the ER (went in for corneal abrasion).  The look on the tech's face was priceless.  As he reached for the phone he said "please tell me you are a marathon runner."  I was impressed he knew to ask the question before hitting the panic button.

        "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

         

          Agree with Slo Hand that comparing RHR between individuals is probably meaningless, but I think for a given individual it can have some meaning.  I know for sure that mine is at least 10-15 bpm lower than it was long ago when I wasn't running.

          - Joe

          We are fragile creatures on collision with our judgment day.

            I don't know what my resting heart rate was before I was a runner. I remember in high school it was around 60. I was an athlete but I think kids have higher heart rates than adults, all things being equal.

             

            The next time I became aware of my heart rate was maybe 6 years ago when I went for a physical. The doctor walked in looking at my chart after the nurse had taken all my vitals down and the first words out of his mouth were, "Are you a runner? Your heart rate is 42."

            Runners run.


            Half Fanatic #846

              Before running - mid 50s

              After running - mid 30s

              Before and after speed - pretty much the same

               

              Meaningless to me other than maybe for reasons like general health and to alarm health care professionals. I'd gladly trade some HR for speed!

              I can do 440 in 220            90% of running is half mental            I ran half of my last race on my left foot!

               

                usually low to mid 50's


                Latent Runner

                  My company does annual health evaluations and offers discounts on health care premiums for folks who maintain their health and fitness.  Unfortunately the "health care professionals" they employ aren't as "professional" as I would like.  Last summer (when I first joined the company) I was measured at 42 and the individual evaluating me insisted I had an untreated high-risk heart condition called Bradycardia (first time I'd ever heard the term), and until I sought medical care to correct it, I wasn't going to get my discount.  I demanded to talk to his boss and she laughed and approved my discount.

                   

                  Same thing happened a few weeks ago, my doctor was delighted with my blood work and my general state of health and fitness, however, the very next day I was evaluated for my health care discount, and this time with a measured RHR of 39 and a BMI (is that a stupid metric for health or what?) of just over 30, the "professional" lectured me on being obese and having a heart arrhythmia, which she insisted could be corrected by losing weight.  Geez, the waist size of my pants is less than half of my height, I'm running 200+ miles per month, and while I certainly could stand to lose ten pounds, I don't believe I'm "obese" in any sense of the word.  Once again, a quick appeal to her boss got my discount reinstated.  Smile

                  Fat old man PRs:

                  • 1-mile (point to point, gravity assist): 5:50
                  • 2-mile: 13:49
                  • 5K (gravity assist last mile): 21:31
                  • 5-Mile: 37:24
                  • 10K (first 10K of my Half Marathon): 48:16
                  • 10-Mile (first 10 miles of my Half Marathon): 1:17:40
                  • Half Marathon: 1:42:13

                    38

                     

                    runs in the family for what I have been told by my dad. He was pro swimmer and still makes a good amount of miles biking and swimming.

                    When I run I feel like a swallow

                    Because you are free like a bird?

                    Nope, because of all the flies I eat.

                     


                    Cheap and Evil Girl

                      Mine has always been high for a runner.  Usually in the 60's.  But probably 10 bpm lower than it was during the times when I wasn't running regularly.

                      I HAVE NO IDEA WHAT I AM DOING.  

                       

                      "Mental toughness is built by doing something that is hard over and over again, especially when you don't feel like doing it. Our society has conditioned us to believe that there should be no discomfort, to stop when we are uncomfortable. But the discomfort we feel when we're doing a challenging workout is an important part of the strengthening process." -Jim Afremow, The Champion's Mind: How Great Athletes Think, Train, and Thrive


                      Feeling the growl again

                        My company does annual health evaluations and offers discounts on health care premiums for folks who maintain their health and fitness.  Unfortunately the "health care professionals" they employ aren't as "professional" as I would like.  Last summer (when I first joined the company) I was measured at 42 and the individual evaluating me insisted I had an untreated high-risk heart condition called Bradycardia (first time I'd ever heard the term), and until I sought medical care to correct it, I wasn't going to get my discount.  I demanded to talk to his boss and she laughed and approved my discount.

                         

                        Same thing happened a few weeks ago, my doctor was delighted with my blood work and my general state of health and fitness, however, the very next day I was evaluated for my health care discount, and this time with a measured RHR of 39 and a BMI (is that a stupid metric for health or what?) of just over 30, the "professional" lectured me on being obese and having a heart arrhythmia, which she insisted could be corrected by losing weight.  Geez, the waist size of my pants is less than half of my height, I'm running 200+ miles per month, and while I certainly could stand to lose ten pounds, I don't believe I'm "obese" in any sense of the word.  Once again, a quick appeal to her boss got my discount reinstated.  Smile

                         

                        I've got more than one running friend whose work physical resulted in them having to wear a 24 hour monitor to prove they didn't have an issue, and the physician would refuse to even consider it could be a normal result of an endurance activity lifestyle.  Some people's heads are just in the sand about this.

                        "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                         

                          Usually women's resting heart rates run higher than men's.

                           

                          Mine has always been high for a runner.  Usually in the 60's.  But probably 10 bpm lower than it was during the times when I wasn't running regularly.

                          Running Goals ...

                           

                          "Don't be afraid to give up the good to go for the great."  John D. Rockefeller

                          scappodaqui


                          rather be sprinting

                            Really, women's higher than men's?  I've always heard the opposite, but I looked it up and it seems to be true--how interesting.  Had no idea.

                            PRs: 5k 19:25, mile 5:38, HM 1:30:56

                            Lifting PRs: back squat 176 lb


                            A Dance with Monkeys

                              OH LOOK EVERYBODY A NORMAL DISTRIBUTION! WHO'D HAVE GUESSED IT??

                                Heh.

                                Runners run.

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