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Heart Rate Help (Read 1048 times)

Iam Bre


    Confused

    I recently got a heart rate monitor to help improve training.  I am lost in all the lingo and when I google it I get all kinds of different answers.  What is it I need to know to help me improve my endurance and speed.  I am currently doing a 5K in about 40 minutes- I know it's really slow!

    cookiemonster


    Connoisseur of Cookies

      Put your heart rate monitor in the drawer and leave it there.  Better yet, return it to the store for a refund.  Want to improve your endurance and speed?  Run more miles.  Even if that means running at a slow pace.  Improve your base and you'll improve your endurance.  Improve your endurance and you will see an improvement in your speed.  After a while you can start working specifically on speed.

       

      All the best.

      ***************************************************************************************

       

      "C" is for cookie.  That's good enough for me.

      ehunter


        You need to determine your maximum heart rate and your lactate threshold heartrate:

        Start with a  3 mile or 30 minute run (whatever you prefer). Treat like a race - this will be a time trial.  At 1 mile or 10 minutes, hit your lap counter or somehow reset your HR monitor.  If this isn't possible, then don't start your watch/monitor until you have ran 10 minutes or 1 mile (you don't want to stop during this time...it is still like a race).  The last 2 miles/20 minutes is what really counts.  You will want to go hard just like a race.  Your average HR over this time/distance will be your lactate threshold rate, and obviously, the maximum HR over this period will be considered your max HR.  It will probably be a little low but it will be good enough - the LT threshold is the most important number anyway.

         

        HR zones will be developed from this LT number and maximum number.  Feel free to send me a message and I can get into some specific details on this stuff, but if you do the above, that will be a great starting point.

         

        I've trained by HR for many years, and it works for me.  Some people don't buy into it, but I have found it to be very successful for me.

        Iam Bre


          You need to determine your maximum heart rate and your lactate threshold heartrate:

          Start with a  3 mile or 30 minute run (whatever you prefer). Treat like a race - this will be a time trial.  At 1 mile or 10 minutes, hit your lap counter or somehow reset your HR monitor.  If this isn't possible, then don't start your watch/monitor until you have ran 10 minutes or 1 mile (you don't want to stop during this time...it is still like a race).  The last 2 miles/20 minutes is what really counts.  You will want to go hard just like a race.  Your average HR over this time/distance will be your lactate threshold rate, and obviously, the maximum HR over this period will be considered your max HR.  It will probably be a little low but it will be good enough - the LT threshold is the most important number anyway.

           

          HR zones will be developed from this LT number and maximum number.  Feel free to send me a message and I can get into some specific details on this stuff, but if you do the above, that will be a great starting point.

           

          I've trained by HR for many years, and it works for me.  Some people don't buy into it, but I have found it to be very successful for me.

          Thanks I will do this. I have read about 220 minus age, etc.   there are so many different formulas I wasn't sure what was what.  I enjoy numbers, so tracking heart rate makes it even more enjoyable.  I appreciate the help :-)

          ehunter


            The 220-age formula can be fairly accurate with some people, or at least get them close - but for others, it is way off.  For me, it actually gets me to within a few beats of my actual max.  I have a couple of friends who doesn't even get into the same ballpark with this formula.  By doing the Max/LT test, it will be "your" number without any doubts - unless you hold off or don't push it during the test.

            Let me know if you have any questions or need help setting up your zones after you get your numbers.  A lot of people set up their zones based on max HR.  I prefer setting them up based off of LT.  In both circumstances, the zones will be fairly similar, though.

              The low heart rate forum is a very friendly and helpful place.

               

              http://www.runningahead.com/groups/LOWHRTR/forum

               

              I personally do my base building based on my MAF number which also matches up with 70% of my maximum HR.

              Age: 46 Weight: 205 Height: 6'2" (Goal weight 195)

              Current PR's:  Mara 3:48:09; HM 1:43:26; 10K 43:59; 5K 21:27

                Confused

                I recently got a heart rate monitor to help improve training.  I am lost in all the lingo and when I google it I get all kinds of different answers.  What is it I need to know to help me improve my endurance and speed.  I am currently doing a 5K in about 40 minutes- I know it's really slow!

                If you really want to train my HR, you might consider reading a book, like Joe Friel's Total Heart Rate Training - or any that start with doing a test, rather than using an age-based formula, which can be very far off. Many web pages don't give you enough context to understand what you're reading. There's several ways of training by HR - including a more traditional method as well as low HR training, which can be very different.

                 

                What will likely work for you though is to just run more while you can talk - lots where you can talk in longer sentences, short amounts of being able to talk in short phrases. Or you could try some formal plan. HRM's can still be used to log your data, if you're interested.

                "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog


                Consistently Slow

                  The low heart rate forum is a very friendly and helpful place.

                   

                  http://www.runningahead.com/groups/LOWHRTR/forum

                   

                  I personally do my base building based on my MAF number which also matches up with 70% of my maximum HR.

                  +1

                  Run until the trail runs out.

                  2014***1500 miles

                  50 miler 13:26:18

                  Race Less Train More

                   

                  Ana Trason  "Living Her Life"

                  "The Marble in The Groove"

                   

                  unsolicited chatter

                  http://bkclay.blogspot.com/

                  Iam Bre


                    I really appreciate all the help- I will check out the other forum and look into the book as well.

                    zonykel


                      "Heart Rate Training" by Benson and Connolly is a decent book to get you started as well.

                       

                      be sure to read about things that "pollute" your HR data. The idea of HR training is that you can determine your level of effort by HR. However, temperature, dehydration, fatigue, etc. impact HR.

                       

                      also, read up on how to fix HR spikes. DC Rainmaker has a website with lots of tips. I typically use electrode gel before a run. Otherwise, with just water, it takes about a mile of running before I start getting accurate data.

                      MrNamtor


                      DON'T TREAD ON ME

                        i agree with cookie monster.

                        markrice


                        Geezer trying for speed

                          Confused

                          I recently got a heart rate monitor to help improve training.  I am lost in all the lingo and when I google it I get all kinds of different answers.  What is it I need to know to help me improve my endurance and speed.  I am currently doing a 5K in about 40 minutes- I know it's really slow!

                           

                          Hi Iam Bre. (Is Bre related to the horse in Chronicles?)

                           

                          I'm a big believer in HR training. I can understand why many don't because it took me a while to embrace it, but WOW the amazing help it's been to me, I only wish I had done it earlier. I'm convinced that most who don't do it are either intimidated by the work/knowledge it takes to start. One DOES feel lost a bit at first because the numbers mean very little until you become accustom to them and learn how to calibrate a bit for conditions.

                           

                          Please visit my site that will give you more. (http://markrice.com/running/heart_rate_training.html)  I'm also going to check out the link that others provided above... looks interesting.

                           

                          People who will tell you not to do it mean well, but I couldn't disagree with them more.  Let me know if I can help at all.

                          Anyone could see races, etc. on www.markrice.com/running.

                          I believe in HR training: www.markrice.com/running/heart_rate_training.html

                          markrice


                          Geezer trying for speed

                            "Heart Rate Training" by Benson and Connolly is a decent book to get you started as well.

                             

                            be sure to read about things that "pollute" your HR data. The idea of HR training is that you can determine your level of effort by HR. However, temperature, dehydration, fatigue, etc. impact HR.

                             

                            also, read up on how to fix HR spikes. DC Rainmaker has a website with lots of tips. I typically use electrode gel before a run. Otherwise, with just water, it takes about a mile of running before I start getting accurate data.

                             

                            Great tips.  ALSO... electrode gel is great. WATER DOES NOT work well. Contrary to popular belief, water does NOT conduct electricity well. DO THIS INSTEAD (if you don't use electrode gel)... use either plenty of spit on the contact points (which is salty) or use very salty water. I keep a small container of heavily salted water and just spread that on the contacts. Works VERY well and costs almost nothing.

                             

                            Here I talk about other HR belt issues.... see if any help you: http://markrice.com/running/heart_rate_training.html#hrbeltissues

                             

                            Let me know if I can help at all.

                            Anyone could see races, etc. on www.markrice.com/running.

                            I believe in HR training: www.markrice.com/running/heart_rate_training.html

                              +1

                               

                               I'm a big believer in HR training. I can understand why many don't because it took me a while to embrace it, but WOW the amazing help it's been to me, I only wish I had done it earlier. I'm convinced that most who don't do it are either intimidated by the work/knowledge it takes to start. One DOES feel lost a bit at first because the numbers mean very little until you become accustom to them and learn how to calibrate a bit for conditions.

                               

                              Please visit my site that will give you more. (http://markrice.com/running/heart_rate_training.html)  I'm also going to check out the link that others provided above... looks interesting.

                               

                              People who will tell you not to do it mean well, but I couldn't disagree with them more.  Let me know if I can help at all.

                              2014 Goals:

                              #1: Do what I can do. <DOING>

                              #2: 365 Hours training <NOPE, INJURED>

                               

                                 I'm convinced that most who don't do it are either intimidated by the work/knowledge it takes to start.

                                Sure. Go with that.

                                Runners run.

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