Why is diet Coke addicting? (Read 2155 times)

    I don't know, when I gave up diet Pepsi I had full withdrawal symptoms. Headaches, shakes, exhaustion, irritability the whole thang and drinking lattes didn't help. Quitting smoking was actually easier. I vote for Asparatime. It does a lot of stuff to both the brain and hormones.
    And some people are allergic to Aspartame. My brother ended up in the hospital the first time he drank a Diet Coke - chest pain, heart palpitations, etc. Can't touch the stuff. So there must be something that chemical does to people that aren't allerigic. I avoid it. Oh, and SJP is hot in the same way Ann Coulter is. Roll eyes

     

      I don't drink pop really much anymore, but I know when I was at basic this summer all I could think about was having a realllllly cold icy diet coke. There's just something about that on a reallly hot day when life sucks. ha ha. Yes My sister got addicted to DC a while ago then she kinda quit drinking it. I will treat myself to one now and again tho...
        I don't drink pop really much anymore, but I know when I was at basic this summer all I could think about was having a realllllly cold icy diet coke. There's just something about that on a reallly hot day when life sucks. ha ha. Yes My sister got addicted to DC a while ago then she kinda quit drinking it. I will treat myself to one now and again tho...
        oh no, dear sister. I am heading downstairs to get a DC right now. Big grin
          lame-o! that's a bad habit! well i confess, i did have a diet coke w/ vodka during the steeler game Clowning around
            lame-o! that's a bad habit! well i confess, i did have a diet coke w/ vodka during the steeler game Clowning around
            Excuse me, are you old enough to drink yet?? oh yeah.... you are. dang. Tongue
            LushOrigin


              Hi there, New to RunningAhead and excited to be starting the C25K plan! When I saw this thread I had to laugh and thought Oh yes, this is the place for me! I am most definitely a Diet Coke 'addict' and to be fair I don't quiet understand it either and have always wondered why people (myself included) are so extreme about their coke habits. On avg I drink about 4 bottles a day. Oh no, I just realized that is 2 liters.I had no idea... I drink a lot more when my schedule is hectic, am stressed, or I don't get enough sleep (that's when I throw in some energy drinks as well.) I tried quitting during the autumn but was only able to keep it up for about 3 weeks. Had the full blown head aches, shaky hands, and a short temper. But seeing this thread has inspired me to try again! It most certainly cant be good for me. I also heard that there is a link between Aspartame and Alzheimer's Disease, any truth to that?
                I also heard that there is a link between Aspartame and Alzheimer's Disease, any truth to that?
                http://www.alz.org/alzheimers_disease_myths_about_alzheimers.asp See point #5
                  I agree with the poster who said genetics must have some impact. I don't drink much in the way of soft drinks (only for weight loss reasons) anymore but when I did I was a Coke man all the way. Couldn't stand to drink anything diet. I quit drinking coke to lose weight - had no problem whatsoever with headaches etc. This past December I had a medical incident which caused me to look further at my diet (blood pressure). The result of that inquiry is that I haven't drank any coffee since mid-December. Now, up to that point I was a 4 -6 cups of coffee a day guy. I just went straight to 0 cups. No withdrawal symptoms or headaches that I could tell. There is some psychological 'addiction', though. I stlll feel the need to walk over to the coffee bar and get a mug of something and sip it at my desk. Only difference is that now it is just hot water. I think my genetics must not pre-dispose me to addiction. I have 8 brothers and sisters and none of us are smokers or more than social drinkers, could be the way we were raised (although a few of us were heavily exposed to smoking/drinking through friends). Confused
                  LushOrigin


                    Thanks MinderBender! Did a little research of my own as well, no idea that I had been believing an urban myth!

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                      Meh, $5 is $5...

                        Tastes decent, cheap, and less risk of hallucination than your standard supersized americano. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/7827761.stm The study's probably flawed. At least that's what I tell myself.
                          Because it is predictable, in contrast to coffee where I work.  The people here do not understand the concept of "refrigerate after opening." Consequently, the 3-pound drum sits in the cabinet for ages and the coffee tastes like utter poison. 

                          "If you have the fire, run..." -John Climacus

                            Well, I'm two months into my break from Diet Coke.  I will have a couple cans a day but stick to water or iced tea (unsweet).


                            I feel a little better (can't quantify it, I just do) but not dropping weight or anything like that.  I certainly recognize that weird chemical taste I had in my mouth after three or four and I appreciate the fact that it doesn't last all day like before. 


                            TC

                            "I'd rather die while I'm living than live while I'm dead..." J. Buffett There are two rules in life: 1.) Don't sweat the small stuff 2.) It's ALL small stuff


                            Maniac

                              I have gotten down to drinking 1 or 2 cans per day on multiple occasions....Can't seem to get to 0.  Typically wind up working my way back up to a 6-pack of Diet Coke per day.

                               

                              Oh well...Better than Vodka, I suppose.

                              Marathon Maniac #6740

                               

                              Goals for 2013:

                               

                              Run 3 Marathons in less than 6 weeks

                              •  PF Chang's Rock N Roll Arizona Marathon (1/20/2013--4:13:19)
                              •  Lost Dutchman Marathon (2/17/2013--4:34:27)
                              •  Phoenix Marathon (03/02/2013--4:17:31)

                               

                              Run 1,500+ miles

                                Everybody talks about it like it is. Is it? Why?

                                 

                                I read about one possibility last night:

                                 

                                After breaking the ketchup down into its component parts, the testers assessed the critical dimension of "amplitude," the word sensory experts use to describe flavors that are well blended and balanced, that "bloom" in the mouth.  "The difference between high and low amplitude is the difference between my son and a great pianist playing 'Ode to Joy' on the piano," Chambers says.  "They are playing the same notes, but they blend better with the great pianist."  Pepperidge Farm shortbread cookies are considered to have high amplitude.  So are Hellman's mayonnaise and Sara Lee poundcake.  When something is high in amplitude, all its constituent elements converge into a single gestalt.  You can't isolate the elements of an iconic, high-amplitude flavor like Coca-Cola or Pepsi.  But you can with one of those private-label colas that you get in the supermarket.  "The thing about Coke and Pepsi is that they are absolutely gorgeous," Judy Heylmun, a vice-president of Sensory Spectrum, Inc., in Chatham, New Jersey, says.  "They have beautiful notes—all flavors are in balance.  It's very hard to do that well.  Usually, when you taste a store cola it's"— and here she made a series of pik! pik! pik! sounds—"all the notes are kind of spiky, and usually the citrus is the first thing to spike out.  And then the cinnamon.  Citrus and brown spice notes are top notes and very volatile, as opposed to vanilla, which is very dark and deep.  A really cheap store brand will have a big, fat cinnamon note sitting on top of everything."

                                 

                                Some of the cheaper ketchups are the same way.  Ketchup aficionados say that there's a disquieting unevenness to the tomato notes in Del Monte ketchup: Tomatoes vary, in acidity and sweetness and the ratio of solids to liquid, according to the seed variety used, the time of year they are harvested, the soil in which they are grown, and the weather during the growing season.  Unless all those variables are tightly controlled, one batch of ketchup can end up too watery and another can be too strong.  Or try one of the numerous private-label brands that make up the bottom of the ketchup market and pay attention to the spice mix; you may well find yourself conscious of the clove note or overwhelmed by a hit of garlic.  Generic colas and ketchups have what Moskowitz calls a hook—a sensory attribute that you can single out, and ultimately tire of.

                                "If you have the fire, run..." -John Climacus