Low HR Training

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Some articles by Mark Allen (Read 1185 times)

C-R


    Wow. This will make a great Sunday read during football. Thanks for the find Jimmy.

     


    "He conquers who endures" - Persius
    "Every workout should have a purpose. Every purpose should link back to achieving a training objective." - Spaniel

    http://ncstake.blogspot.com/

      The following is from the base training link.

       

      -If you are over about 55 years old or younger than about 25 years old, add another 5 beats to whatever number you now have.

      -If you are about 60 years old or older OR if you are about 20 years old or younger, add an additional 5 beats to the corrected number you now have.

       

      If the above is really correct, it sounds like once you hit 50 years old, you pretty much should just keep your MAF number for the next 10 years.  Am I reading this correctly? 


      go barefoot

         

        If the above is really correct, it sounds like once you hit 50 years old, you pretty much should just keep your MAF number for the next 10 years.  Am I reading this correctly? 

         

         

        Well, as I figure it, with the basic MAF formula, it'd look like this:

         

        55 yrs old = 130bpm (180-55+5=130)

        56 yrs old = 129bpm

        57 yrs old = 128bpm

        58 yrs old = 127bpm

        59 yrs old = 126bpm

        60 yrs old = 130bpm (180-60+5+5=130)

        61yrs old = 129bpm

        etc...

         

        Seems a little strange that you should suddenly jump up at 55 and again at 60 yrs. but, maybe staying within the 126-130 range for those ten years would not make a tremendous difference one way or the other, and I suspect that your conclusion is pretty realistic.

         

        Mega thanks to Jimmy for the excellent links!!!

        When the sun comes up, you'd better be running


        Happy

          Yes, WG, it looks more or less like 130 BPM forever after 50. I'm a month away from that and enjoying the 131BPM speed limit while it lasts..... LOL!
          5K, 4/28/07 24:16 PR 10K, 5/5/07 49:23 PR 1/2 M, 12/08/07 1:49:34 PR Marathon, 12/09/06 3:57:37 BQ 50K, 10/04/2009 7:27:00 PB 40M, 4/17/2010 11:20:00 PB
            Thanks for the articles Jimmy, finally got a chance to catch up on some reading now that my semester just ended. Good stuff.

               

               

              Well, as I figure it, with the basic MAF formula, it'd look like this:

               

              55 yrs old = 130bpm (180-55+5=130)

              56 yrs old = 129bpm

              57 yrs old = 128bpm

              58 yrs old = 127bpm

              59 yrs old = 126bpm

              60 yrs old = 130bpm (180-60+5+5=130)

              61yrs old = 129bpm

              etc...

               

              Seems a little strange that you should suddenly jump up at 55 and again at 60 yrs. but, maybe staying within the 126-130 range for those ten years would not make a tremendous difference one way or the other, and I suspect that your conclusion is pretty realistic.

               

              Mega thanks to Jimmy for the excellent links!!!

               

              Maffetone talks about that somewhat in his book "The Maffetone Method" and you may not need to lower your MAF HR at age 56.

               

              On page 63, there is a paragraph titled "Modifying Your Heart Rate" and it reads:

               

              "Once you find your maximum aerobic heart rate and can exercise successfully at that rate, continue to use the same heart rate for about four to five years if health and fitness continue to progress. Then decrease the training rate by about 3 bpm. At that stage your training heart rate may not match the 180-Formula since your overall health and fitness will have improved. Thus, this formula is most beneficial at the start of a program and during periods of great progress. However, if you stop progressing, it may be because your exercise heart rate is too high; in some cases this may be because the 180-Formula was not calculated properly. It is important to be honest and objective in determining your maximum aerobic heart rate."

               

              So if you use the 180-Formula at age 55 and calculate your MAF as 130, you can keep 130 for up to five years as long as you're progressing and healthy. At age 60, you add 5 and can then stay at 130.

               

               

              The pain that hurts the worse is the imagined pain. One of the most difficult arts of racing is learning to ignore the imagined pain and just live with the present pain (which is always bearable.) - Jeff

               

              2014 Goals:

               

              Stay healthy

              Enjoy life