1

Lost Dutchman Marathon (Read 891 times)

    Rroush, I wanted to start a subject for your upcoming race. Good Luck, I know you will do great.
      Thanks Charles! I guess I have to write something in here now. Smile This is the 3rd marathon I have run in 3 months (5 in total) and I decided 2 weeks ago to do the whole instead of the half. My sister qualified for Boston this past December and told me I have 1 year to qualify so we can go together! Big grin I am really going to have to step up my training to make that goal or even get close. My fastest marathon time is 4:17 and I finished this one in 4:27. I was really excited about this race until I got to mile 17. I was running at about an 8:30 pace or so, but then I hit the hills. The elevation chart on the website is deceptive in that even in the spots where you don't have an overall increase or decrease in elevation, there are tons of rolling hills. Seeing as how I usually run on flat land, this was extremely hard for me! I ended up walking most of the last 5 miles, which completely ruined my time. Ugh. I figured though, if the pros can bow out of races that they aren't doing well in, then so can I right? Wink Charles, I was really happy to hear about your race! I am so excited you are getting hooked on running! Maybe we can be virtual running partners and keep each other posted regularly especially since we have this nifty website to track each other on!!! Oh, one more thing, I know I have always had issues with hydrating enough (especially in the days leading up to a race), but my big issue was nausea. Maybe I will post questions about this in a different spot on this site. I would love to hear advice from others on this as it really impedes the ends of my races.


      You'll ruin your knees!

        I have used a few different things for nausea. The most immediate is Tums. I used to think these were just for indigestion, however, I have found them to be effective in calming an upset stomach when running. Another remedy that is pretty effective is papaya enzyme (chewable tablets...either chewed or swallowed). I find these to be a little slower to work, but I have used them with some success to avoid nauea in the first place. Zantac, another very effective OTC tablet for indegestion is also effective. Basically, when racing, I take a Zantac before I start. They are long-lasting and usually don't require re-application. They are good for avoiding acid reflux/indigestion so that it does not become a factor in races/long runs. Next, I sometimes use papaya enzyme when taking food. The enzyme assists in teh digestion to help avoid the distress that comes from the stomach trying hard to digest the food, while the blood is away trying to move oxygen to the brain and to cool the body surface and other such nonsense. Finally, I use Tums when the other remedies fail! It is fast acting and pretty good at relieving some, if not all of the nausea. My $.02...boy did you get your money's worth out of this! Shocked Oh, and good job on the race! Hills can really wreak havoc on the legs! If you are also fighting stomach problems, you had your hands full. Way to stick it out... Lynn B

        ""...the truth that someday, you will go for your last run. But not today—today you got to run." - Matt Crownover (after Western States)

          Wow, Lynn! Thanks so much! I will have to try it before my next long training run. It makes more sense to take it before a run then to take it after a run and still be suffering (which is what usually happens with me). So, I am guessing you bring a couple of tums with you during a long race just is case too? I really loved your post about your 100-miler, by the way. I showed one of my friends who is just now getting into running and we were both extremely inspired! Thanks for your $0.02! I will take it anytime! Smile


          You'll ruin your knees!

            Hi rroush, The Zantac usually keeps indigestion at bay, I use the Tums more for quick relief on any stomach distress I experience. I think it was you that mentioned wanting to complete a 50 miler someday. Well, here's my write-up (with pics) about a 50 mile race that you could keep in mind as a goal... http://www.nttr.org/assets/bighorn_mountain_wild.pdf BTW, if you're doing marathons, the 50 miler is definitely not out of reach. Biggest change is learning how to fuel/hydrate properly and specific training for hills/heat/nighttime/wolves Tongue...whatever...early in 2001, I could barely run 3 miles (WITH walk breaks) and hated every step I took. My marathon best is 3:53 later that year. I have just found that I love being on the trail... Lynn B

            ""...the truth that someday, you will go for your last run. But not today—today you got to run." - Matt Crownover (after Western States)

              Hi Lynn, I am so grateful for all of your information! I talked with a running coach here and he also thinks I am not hydrating or eating enough during my races. So, I will really have to practice doing both and seeing if it makes a difference. I run long runs with a belt and water bottle so can bring along some tums to try that out as well. I so appreciate your advice and am glad there is a possible solution to this! Smile I loved your write up about your 50 miler. It really looks like it is in the middle of nowhere but absolutely beautiful! I can't believe you stood right next to a fresh bear paw print! Freaky! Hopefully they stayed away when they heard you all coming! I think I would have to prepare in multiple ways for a race like that! It is cold (compared to Arizona), at elevation, moist or humid, and uphill! I am in utter and complete awe of it all! Oddly enough, it still sounds FABULOUS to me despite the elements!!! I would love what a training plan for a 50 miler looks like sometime (if you are willing to divulge your secrets)! I read all your logs and watch your miles. They are very inspiring to me so keep on posting your latest! Smile


              You'll ruin your knees!

                If you are in AZ, you will definitely need to learn how to stay hydrated. The low humidity can be brutal, as your sweat evaporates so quickly that you may not always realize just how much you are perspiring (read...loss of hydration!). Another big watchout, particularly for women in long distances, is hyponatremia (water intoxication). FROM THE WEB: As you consume large amounts of water over the course of a day, blood plasma (the liquid part of blood) increases thereby diluting the salt content of the blood. At the same time, your body also loses salt by sweating. Consequently, the amount of electrolytes available to your body tissues decreases over time to a point where that loss interferes with brain, heart, and muscle function! You have to replace these electrolytes! They're essential to the normal electro-chemical operation of your nervous system. Talk to your running coach contact about electrolytes and how to make sure you are replacing enough of these essential metals (well, mostly metals, I think) as you get the hydration down. Where are you in AZ? There are lots of options for races close to home. I can give you some ideas for your area. You might consider jumping to a trail 50K first, as it is close to the distance of a marathon. The 50K is the 'breakthrough' race for ultramarathoners. It also gives you a great introduction to distance beyone the 26.2 and the trails at the same time. Most runners agree that post-race recovery for a 50K is much quicker than for a marathon. Lynn B

                ""...the truth that someday, you will go for your last run. But not today—today you got to run." - Matt Crownover (after Western States)

                  I'm in the Phoenix area. I think I have seen some 50K races on local running websites here, but never actually read about them since I thought getting through 26.2 was hard enough. Having done 5 marathons now and a number of halfs, I guess I had better start looking into those 50Ks. I don't remember when any of them are though...if it is late winter time like now or fall. My current goal is to qualify for Boston then start increasing the distances. But with the increase in training I am planning, I hope this will get me that much close to the ultras. I got my VO2 max tested today though it was approximate because I panicked a little before I actually got to max. I did reach anaerobic threshold though and my max estimate is 55%. I was ecstatic considering this is considered superior for 20-29 year old males (I'm a 31 year old female)! Big grin My issue with hydration definitely leans on the dehydration side. But, I am getting better at this. I used to not bring any water with me even for long runs in summer. I stupidly thought that since it was only 80 degrees when I ran at 5 am it was ok. Well, I have learned lots about that in the past couple of years...thank goodness! Just have to train my stomach to handle more food fueling now (for the electrolytes and energy too) and a bit more water than what I currently drink.
                  Mile Collector


                  Abs of Flabs

                    rroush, I have a dehydration/electrolyte problems too during marathons. My entire legs used to cramp up at around mile 18-20 during a marathon, but I think I figured it all out. I weighed myself before and after my long runs. From that, I would determine how much water I'm losing through sweat (don't forget to include the water you drink during the run), and then how much I'm losing per hour. Once I know that, then I know exactly how much to drink during my runs. Maybe that's something you can try. eric Smile
                      Thanks Eric! I will give that a shot! My marathon training for the RnR in San Diego this June officially started last weekend. Smile I will have plenty of time to test all the tips from you guys out in the next 15 weeks. Thanks again!