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Intervals (Read 666 times)


I've got a fever...

    That's awesome. Sometimes it's stuff we runners take for granted, so it's good to see it get this kind of exposure.

    On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.

    Scout7


    CPT Curmudgeon

      Wow, interval training improves fitness. Who would've guessed? They also don't seem to mention some of the other risks, such as increased chance for injury.


      I've got a fever...

        They also don't seem to mention some of the other risks, such as increased chance for injury.
        Apparently it wasn't fit to print...

        On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.

          Wow, interval training improves fitness. Who would've guessed? They also don't seem to mention some of the other risks, such as increased chance for injury.
          Scout at his cranky best. I have to say that I disliked the article as well because this is a hypothesis that does not need a scientific laboratory to conclusively test. Don't get me wrong. I'm a big fan of science and the experimental method, but the experimental method and the laboratory apparatus are not necessarily related. In fact, one could argue that the institutions of science are keeping the experimental method from spreading by localizing it under the authority of scientific experts.


          A Dance with Monkeys

            one could argue that the institutions of science are keeping the experimental method from spreading by localizing it under the authority of scientific experts.
            Actually, it is the government. If the NIH budget were not so actively shrinking (ever wonder where those dollars going to Iraq are coming from), then science would have a better chance. But our country's voters have elected different priorities. And so the few remaining dollars for science go to those institutions with the greatest research intertia. Sometimes they have good scientists. Sometimes they just have a lot of experience writing grants.
              Interesting article. Well, not really. Nothing new, and too vague to be much help to someone who didn't already know it. But still. One thing that popped out was this: But new evidence suggests that a workout with steep peaks and valleys can dramatically improve cardiovascular fitness and raise the body’s potential to burn fat. Best of all, the benefits become evident in a matter of weeks. Two big problems with that. Other than the obvious - like Scout said, they don't mention injury (other than increased risk of heart attack). First - they make it sound like a shortcut. Sort of like a fad diet. You know people are going to read this and say "hey, why run 30 miles this week - I can just do some intervals." That approach won't work any better with running that it does with weight loss. Second - that "just a matter of weeks" bit. As I understand it, yeah - you can get quick results. But are they permanent? My impression is that intervals are great in the weeks or months building up to a race, for that last push towards a goal ... but that its all the base training that creates permanent improvement, a foundation for the next push forward. I love intervals. But I don't look at them as a shortcut. I've always liked Mikey's analogy about using a hammer for the blunt work before you switch to the razor for the fine tuning. (Or something like that). This article makes it sound like you can skip the hammer part.
              E-mail: JakeKnight2002@aol.com
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                Intervals are NOT for me. Apparently they only work if you do them at 80 to 85% of maximum heart rate. And I'm against HRMs for religious reasons. Oh well.

                Runners run.

                  Actually, it is the government. If the NIH budget were not so actively shrinking (ever wonder where those dollars going to Iraq are coming from), then science would have a better chance. But our country's voters have elected different priorities. And so the few remaining dollars for science go to those institutions with the greatest research intertia. Sometimes they have good scientists. Sometimes they just have a lot of experience writing grants.
                  Sure. I didn't mean to suggest that the way the institutions of science are organized was dreamed up by scientists. If only that were the case! In fact, the problem is that these institutions themselves aren't subjected to the experimental method--because of funding problems and other reasons.


                  A Dance with Monkeys

                    the problem is that these institutions themselves aren't subjected to the experimental method
                    Man. You should be a philosopher. Actually, there are some groups evaluating this exact question. But it ain't easy research to do.
                      Actually, there are some groups evaluating this exact question. But it ain't easy research to do.
                      Cool. I'd love to know who these folks are. Sweet geeky hijack, by the way. Well done.


                      I've got a fever...

                        I agree that the article (and the study for that matter -- control group and double-blind are important and oft-ignored procedures) left a lot to be desired, but I still believe that getting more exposure to the idea of interval workouts is a good thing for John Q. Public. Intervals are not for everyone, but they do inject variety into training, and a lot of people need variety in order to even stick with an exercise regimen. Intervals are fun, stoke your metabolism, and a great way to make big short term gains in fitness. Those short term gains could potentially get someone interested in serious running in a way that they wouldn't have considered before, and that's always a good thing. The increased interest in working out will lead to longer-term fitness. Yes, I agree the exclusion of Scout's point about injury is unfortunate -- that's the single biggest problem with the article.

                        On your deathbed, you won't wish that you'd spent more time at the office.  But you will wish that you'd spent more time running.  Because if you had, you wouldn't be on your deathbed.