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Dew point / humidity (Read 438 times)

corland


    So wouldn't heat and humidity play a similar role to training at altitude?

      You can relate heat + humidity to altitude training only in the way that you are running slower when it's hot and faster when it's cool. But altitude is different in that you are in oxygen debt, etc. The whole red blood cell stuff. I don't think you build extra red blood cells running in this soup.

       

      I had a "race" on Saturday that finished at 162. It was awful. I tempo'd it by HR. I've had 17 consecutive runs at MI > 140 and this are all in the morning. The longest streak I've ever seen before was about 5. And my log goes back to 2004. Even my unheated pool is not refreshing anymore at 86F this morning.

       

      I can make it 4-5 miles or 40ish minutes before the wheels fall off. Maybe I should take some Gatorade on these runs. I've just resigned myself to the fact that I really don't want to run over 60-75 minutes in this crap.

        This morning the dew point and temp were the same. Mercifully, it was cool-ish but I looked like I had been swimming in that lake, not running around it.

         

         

        LedLincoln


          This morning the dew point and temp were the same. Mercifully, it was cool-ish but I looked like I had been swimming in that lake, not running around it.

           

           

           

          Nice lake, I think I would have been swimming in it.

          Nothing so needs reforming as other people's habits.
          - Mark Twain


          Unfortunate Miles

            I've been thinking about this quite a bit recently. It seems to me that the closer the dew point to the ambient temp, the less tolerable the conditions, given a stable misery index (which I've taken to calling the suckage factor).

             

            I wonder if this is a better approach:

             

            (Temp + Dew Point) / int(1- (Dew Point / Temp)) = Misery Index.

             

            This latter one increases the index based on how high the dew point is relative to the temperature. But I still don't think it is right.

             

             

            Here's a cool metric I came up with a while back. I call it the Misery Index: Temp + Dew Point = Misery Index.

             

            You will start to feel affects above 130. 140-149 and you finish your run like you swam in a pool. 150-159. It will feel like death is running behind you,  blowing his stank humid breath on you. 160+.... don't even bother...

             

            So...106 + 32 = 138 and 92 + 45 = 137. Basically equal. But one does not have the solar radiation, while the other does. That is why the nighttime run feels better than the midday run....

              To me, misery index is good enough. You'll never capture all the variables necessary to come up with the One True Measure of weather suckitude. While it's usually true that the closer the dew point to the ambient temp, the less comfortable, all else being equal, all else is never equal. 85 degrees with a dew point of 40 but direct sunshine would suck way worse than 63 degrees with a dew point of 62 with overcast and light drizzle. Both would have a misery index of 125.

              Runners run.

              ctbamafan


                Looks like this thread is about three years old, but I would also love to be able to enter a Humidity #.

                jbaco


                  I would like that entry, as well.

                  LedLincoln


                    Side note. Here's our temp/dewpoint graph so far today.  The closer together the lines are, the greater the misery(?).  I actually had a lovely run this morning at 6:00, but I was indeed sweating.

                     

                    Nothing so needs reforming as other people's habits.
                    - Mark Twain


                    Unfortunate Miles

                      Right now 94 + 77. 

                      going for a “run” in a couple hours. Gonna be fun.

                        It’s interesting to see this several years later. It now appears there are lasting effects to training in the heat as it increases your blood plasma volume. This is one link but I’ve seen a lot of this lately:

                        Outside magazine

                         

                        You can relate heat + humidity to altitude training only in the way that you are running slower when it's hot and faster when it's cool. But altitude is different in that you are in oxygen debt, etc. The whole red blood cell stuff. I don't think you build extra red blood cells running in this soup.

                         


                        Unfortunate Miles

                          Well, I did not end up getting to go for a run after all. One of the most incredible electric, hail, rain storms I’ve seen in my many years was triggered by these densely hot and humid conditions. It’s been going on now for a couple hours and I have to get back to work. Oh well.

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