Homeschooling? (Read 1985 times)

    Do you think this additional maturity and responsibility is a result of homeschooling?  If so, what is it about homeschooling that yields a more mature and responsible child?  (I find this subject interesting.  After all, go back in time and any schooling you got before University was probably homeschooling.)  Growing up, I only knew a few kids who were homeschooled and they didn't seem any more or less mature or responsible than any of the kids attending public or private school.  But, I'll freely admit that the very few I knew was certainly not a representative sample.

     

     

    To the OP, you mentioned that your husband was concerned about your schedule.  Are you concerned?  As a former teacher, I'd think you would know better than most the level of effort required to effectively teach something.  In any event, if you prioritize, you'll probably find enough hours in the day.  Best of luck!

    I have known a number of homeschooled kids who seemed to have done very well.  They were all homeschooled because their Christian parents believed that they could better provide the kind of education they wanted (Christian) and to isolate their children from "bad influences" in the public schools.

    Homeschooled kids by definition have lots more parental involvement.  That could account for significant differences.  They also have parents who, rightly or wrongly, believe they are up to the task of being their children's educators.  Some selection is happening there.

    i don't have a general opinion on whether it's the right thing to do.  Depends on the parents and the available schools.

    Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

      Warning:  Friendly mocking ahead (emphasis in above post is mine).

       

      This made my day in a post about how well the poster did teaching his children.

       

      No offense intended.  I can see that you did a good job with your kids, it just made me smile.

       

      It's also Asperger's, not Asberger's.  Usually when I see a typo, I assume that is all it is, unless I see "wierd" then I know they don't know how to spell.

       

      I am glad to hear about the positives of homeschooling.  My only exposure to it was a girl maybe 11 years old that came up to talk to my kids at the library.  Her mother quickly shuttled her away from us in a very paranoid creepy way.

      "During a marathon, I run about two-thirds of the time. That's plenty." - Margaret Davis, 85 Ed Whitlock regarding his 2:54:48 marathon at age 73, "That was a good day. It was never a struggle."

        I should add that while they did very well academically, their social circles and their world view were quite tightly controlled.  Not the approach I would take.

        Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

          One of my good friends was homeschooled because her parents didn't like the public school system, could not afford our local Christian school, but did not want to take the available financial help to pay for the Christian school for all 9 years.  She was homeschooled from gr. 2-7.   When she came to the Christian school in gr.8 (my class), she was quiet but VERY smart.  Once she hit high school she developed the necessary social skills.  She's now in an accounting program at University of Waterloo (arguably the best math program in Canada).  Being homeschooled didn't hurt her at all, if anything, she was the better for it.

          'No matter how slow you go, you're still lapping everyone on the couch'

           

          "Running is a big question mark that's there each and every day. It asks you, 'Are you going to be a wimp or are you going to be strong today?'"  - Peter Maher

           

          "Running long and hard is an ideal antidepressant, since it's hard to run and feel sorry for yourself at the same time. Also, there are those hours of clearheadedness that follow a long run."  -Monte Davis


          Non ducor, duco.

             If so, what is it about homeschooling that yields a more mature and responsible child?  

             

            I think that most homeschooled students are around adults more than kids in other schools. I had a really in-depth conversation about third-party candidates and movements with my son this morning. It was totally impromptu and natural. It was like talking to another adult. He asked questions, mentioned his ideas and listened to mine. That simply does not happen in most schools today outside of a formal lecture by a teacher where it is often a "Bueller, Bueller" kind of exchange. The opportunities to do such thing after school are few when most kids have lots of activities and Ipods stuck in their heads 24/7.  (Yes, my son does that too) 



            I'm back.


            Non ducor, duco.

              I should add that while they did very well academically, their social circles and their world view were quite tightly controlled.  Not the approach I would take.

               

              I find the exact opposite to be true. My son has access and interaction with a much wider spectrum of people than just 14-17 year olds in the high school. 

              I'm back.

                I find the exact opposite to be true. My son has access and interaction with a much wider spectrum of people than just 14-17 year olds in the high school. 

                 Sure, I was only referring to the ones I have known, and I'm sure you're right about their comfort in interacting with adults.

                Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

                  I find the exact opposite to be true. My son has access and interaction with a much wider spectrum of people than just 14-17 year olds in the high school. 

                   

                  A typical high school day would require interacting with maybe 20 or 30 14-17 year olds and probably 8 or so different adults. Not to mention negotiating the different classroom environments, which each have different rules, different conceptions of order, different purposes, etc.


                  Non ducor, duco.

                    The thing that I have observed from many homeschool kids is a  lack of a competitive nature. I may be stepping into a big pile of poo by speaking in generalities. I wonder if there is something about getting the crap kicked out of you or just the general social awkwardness  of highschool that toughens some kids. I think it also destroys some. The trick for me is to foster that spirit somehow.

                    I'm back.


                    HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer

                      Do you think this additional maturity and responsibility is a result of homeschooling?  If so, what is it about homeschooling that yields a more mature and responsible child?  ...

                       

                      I'd guess:

                      • lack of exposure to the strong mob/peer pressure issues that seem to arise naturally in the normal, shared, high student/teacher ratio schools
                      • More interactions with adults, providing more help moderating the emotional swings of those youth years

                      It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.

                        The thing that I have observed from many homeschool kids is a  lack of a competitive nature. I may be stepping into a big pile of poo by speaking in generalities. I wonder if there is something about getting the crap kicked out of you or just the general social awkwardness  of highschool that toughens some kids. I think it also destroys some. The trick for me is to foster that spirit somehow.

                         

                        I don't think that has anything to do with where a person is schooled.   How many kids really get the crapped kicked out of them at schools today? Even if they did, would really make them more competitive, or kids that retaliate?

                         

                        I know quite a few home-schooled kids (I was the cubmaster for a scout pack and about 20 kids were all home schooled, and I've worked with parents that home-schooled). Nice kids. Just a little different than the public/private schooled kids, but neither in a good or bad way.  

                         

                        If a parent can handle it, and do a good job, I say more power to you. It's more time you get to spend with your kids. 

                          We homeschool, and our daughter is 12 now.  She will be taking high school level classes this fall (at home and 2 days per week at our co-op).  We're a little strange in the homeschooling community, if thats possible - We only have 1 childShocked

                           

                          (1) Homeschooling does not mean you are home all the time.  The homeschooling parent should take advantage of the fact that the "school" part can be knocked out quickly - allowing more time for extra-cirricular activites, field trips, community involvement, etc.  My daughter was a competitive gymnast and is now excelling in ballet.  She's learning the piano, etc etc.  She's visited senior citziens at nursing homes.  She can relate to people of all different ages.  A homeschooled child SHOULD be "socialized" as good or better than private or public school students, simply because she has more time outside the age-graded atmosphere.

                           

                          (2) High school level homeschooling NEED NOT be harder for the parent.  By this time, your child should be learning much on her own.  This is perfect because that's what she will do in College!  No parent or teacher is going to spoon feed you in College.  My wife has spent less time "actively teaching" certain subjects now than before for that reason.  If you're still apprehensive, find a solid (do your homework) academic coop that offers classes you don't want to teach.

                           

                          (3) My wife and I are both engineers, but education is not the biggest factor for parents.  The most important thing a homeschooling parent (usually Mom, but not always) needs is organization.  If you are not organized, you will struggle.

                           

                          Homeschooling is like most other things in life.  You get back what you put in to it.  Many parents "try" homeschooling for a year or 2 with a half-hearted effort.  We recognize them now right away, and know they will fail.  You have to be willing to go ALL IN.  We sacrificed our 2nd engineering income and it has been totally worth it.

                           

                          And yes, it may mean missing some training runs, for a while anyway.

                          2012 Goals: 1:35-ish Half Mary ->(result 1:38:40).  Bust the sub 20 5k barrier (19:54!!!!) and whoop the 1000 mile bunny (ok, bunny, you win).


                          Non ducor, duco.

                             

                            And yes, it may mean missing some training runs, for a while anyway.

                             
                            I object! It doesn't mean missing training runs any more than any other facet of life.  

                            I'm back.

                               
                              I object! It doesn't mean missing training runs any more than any other facet of life.  

                               

                              all the homeskool moms i know usually get done with the day in 4-5 hours.

                               

                              ive heard its expensive too.

                                all the homeskool moms i know usually get done with the day in 4-5 hours.

                                 

                                ive heard its expensive too.

                                We know a wide variety after so many years.  Some get done early, while some are at it all day long + weekends. 

                                 

                                We spend ~$1000 per year.  That is probably average, or even slightly above average.  The cost per child would come down with more kids, depending on how much you can share curriculum (easier in the early grades, maybe less so in High School when they start specializing).

                                2012 Goals: 1:35-ish Half Mary ->(result 1:38:40).  Bust the sub 20 5k barrier (19:54!!!!) and whoop the 1000 mile bunny (ok, bunny, you win).