123

Getting fast before going long (Read 368 times)

     

    Great post but I disagree that the 5k is over quickly. It goes on forever...

     

    That's what I am afraid of !!  My first is this weekend - I've been procrastinating forever doing a 5K.

       

      That's what I am afraid of !!  My first is this weekend - I've been procrastinating forever doing a 5K.

       

      I think what Mike was referring to is because when you race a 5K, and race it hard, it seems like the finish line will never come.  When that's how a 5K feels, you know you've tried your hardest.   Of course, when you race a marathon, the last 6 miles feel about the same way.

        This is an interesting questions…I’m not sure I truly have an answer but I do have (pretty extensive knowledge of Smile) my own experience. I think that there is a “season” for every race; Maybe this fall isn’t the “season” for your marathon, maybe it is. In my personal opinion, the marathon is a different beast and it is best to know that it will be your goal. If your “iffy” about it, perhaps this isn’t the time. I started running at 13…last fall (Sept. 30, 2012) I ran my first full marathon. For the first time in 17 years (many of which I dreamed about running a marathon) I knew I was ready on the day I registered. My original goal was to qualify for Boston, then I wanted to beat my qualify time by more than 20 minutes, by the time I toed the line I had vision of a 3 hour marathon RUNNING through my head. Race day was one of the happiest of my life…I missed my goal by a minute and 33 seconds, running a 3:01:33. I so nervous that morning but I was ready, happy, excited. I knew it was the right time to be running that race. Then, I registered for Boston.

         

        When I registered for Boston, I was worried. Was it too soon after my first marathon? Was it too much pressure for only my second full? I came off the first race with too little rest, at too fast a pace, pushing through injuries, pain. I wasn’t ready; it wasn’t my “season.” Now, I sit behind this computer, nursing a stress fracture that doesn’t want to heal; I’m running tonight…in the pool. I got the email from BAA earlier this week. I would have been in the first wave at Boston, the fourth corral. I’m not going to lie, I’m sad. BUT, I have every intention of recovering and trying to break an hour for the 15k this fall. Perhaps, it is the season for a 15k PR….Boston will have to wait.

         

        Moral of the story….listen to your body and mind. Pushing through obstacles is always good; Just make sure they’re the correct ones. If you need to find your speed, feel free. Marathons are not the only race to be admired. I was a miler in high school and it was the most painful 5 minutes of my life.

          Hi guys! Long time browser, first-time poster.

           

          I'm wondering whether to eschew my fall marathon this year (it would be my third) and instead focus on shorter distances. After crashing and burning in my second marathon last October (a PR, but with a hellishly slow final 10k), and struggling with an achilles issue since then, I've been thinking: Did I jump into the marathon too quickly?

           

          Daniels suggests starting runners on short races for years before moving them up to longer distances. It sounds like a lot of elites do this too - witness Rupp's and Farah's reticence to jump into the marathon. Daniels also inserts repeats early in the season, even for marathoners, as a way to improve form.

           

          This contrasts to my own experience. I had never done any really structured training before doing Pfitzinger's 18/55 program ahead of last fall's marathon. I made it through the program somehow, and it whipped me into way better shape. But I wonder whether all those slow miles have put a ton of stress on my body, given that I've never seriously trained for shorter distances. Especially since the race, all I've dared to run has been "easy" mileage, which has probably led to poor form. I was hoping to get a fast, short season in this spring before transitioning to marathon training this fall.

           

          What are y'alls' experience with this? How many people jumped into marathons quickly, and how many of you had some longer history of racing 5-15k relatively seriously first? Can the latter group comment on their injury history?

           

          You already received great advice in this thread so I won't give any.

          My experience -   I started off running pretty much nothing but marathons.  From about '96 to '07 I ran 23  marathons, I know that's not a HUGE amount but it demonstrates a focus on the marathon.  I might have raced at most 5 times shorter than a marathon in that time period.  I did get under 3 hours like that but it was a massive struggle and after my first sub-3 my times went back up again .... until I started racing shorter races and lots of them.  I still run one marathon a year but now I have a long string of sub-3's and a marathon PR at age 50.   If I could go back to 96 I'd train for and run lots of 5K's and 10K's (and run more mileage), especially 10K.  For me it's the sweet spot of racing.  If the marathon is your sweet spot then run it - but train for and run some of the other races to find out.

          J-L-C


            J-L-C, I kinda disagree. You could race a half this month and do pretty good. Regardless how fit you get there will always be a differential between your 10K and half (or marathon) effort. The half would especially surprise you since it's not really half the punishment on your body as a full. I'm sure if you went at the correct pace you could push the whole way.

             

            I ran my first ever run over 14 miles last week and it seemed like it took ages. Hardly what I'd call adequate preparation for racing a half!  Especially when I already get halfway through 10ks and wonder how on Earth I'll make it to the end of those. Running a 10k and then doing it again?! Holy crap. That's taking getting lost in the hurtlocker to a whole new level...  Wink

               

              I ran my first ever run over 14 miles last week and it seemed like it took ages. Hardly what I'd call adequate preparation for racing a half!  Especially when I already get halfway through 10ks and wonder how on Earth I'll make it to the end of those. Running a 10k and then doing it again?! Holy crap. That's taking getting lost in the hurtlocker to a whole new level...  Wink

               

              I guess what I'm saying is that when you've already gotten your 10K under 36 running a decent half is more a frame of mind than getting in even better shape for it. Yeah, some more long runs would help seal the deal but a half marathon isn't two 10K races back to back. It's a half marathon. Think long quick tempo. It's gonna be uncomfortable after your first 10K but not deadly. When you do run one you will crush it. I'm sure.

                 

                I ran my first ever run over 14 miles last week and it seemed like it took ages. Hardly what I'd call adequate preparation for racing a half!  Especially when I already get halfway through 10ks and wonder how on Earth I'll make it to the end of those. Running a 10k and then doing it again?! Holy crap. That's taking getting lost in the hurtlocker to a whole new level...  Wink

                 

                Well, what X said, and also consider that it's unreasonable to assume you're going to run the same pace when doubling the distance.  Just like you don't run teh same pace in 5 and 10K.  If you start out at 10K pace, Yes, the "hurtlocker" (great term by the way!) will come long before the finish line.

                J-L-C


                  I understand what you guys are saying. I think we're just saying slightly different things. I don't think I'm going to run 10k pace for a half. I just don't feel that at this point I would be able to run an equivalent performance in a half that I could in a 5k or 10k. And I find a 10k much, much harder than a 5k so I'm a bit intimidated by the prospect of a race more than double the distance of an already excruciating 10k. Sure, the speed is slower, but the speed is also slower in a 10k than a 5k but wow, it's a suffer-fest from 6k onwards.

                   

                  I want to run a good half debut and I still think I'm a good year away from managing that since my training has been tailored to 5k/10ks. I'm just now beginning to run mileage that is more sufficient for my 5ks/10ks and have done so with very few longer runs or longer workouts which I feel is paramount to a good half. There are a few more pieces to add before I think my half marathon puzzle will start looking good. Cool

                    No. You must run a half! The world depends upon it. Wink

                    123