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How to train for a half marathon (Can only run 2.5 miles max) (Read 460 times)

    First of all-- listen to Spaniel, I've never seen him lead anyone astray.

     

    Also, consider building up to 3 miles, 3-4X a week, then google "Hal Higdon Novice 1 Half Marathon" if you are the type of person who thrives on structure.  Another great site if you're willing to pay a bit is Running Wizard, the plans there are quite affordable.

    'No matter how slow you go, you're still lapping everyone on the couch'

     

    "Running is a big question mark that's there each and every day. It asks you, 'Are you going to be a wimp or are you going to be strong today?'"  - Peter Maher

     

    "Running long and hard is an ideal antidepressant, since it's hard to run and feel sorry for yourself at the same time. Also, there are those hours of clearheadedness that follow a long run."  -Monte Davis


    Feeling the growl again

      I'm not sure I agree with the arbitrary statement that you're running too fast.  Each person has his own comfortable pace. 

       

      I would disagree with the characterization of my advice as arbitrary.  9:30 pace is very, very solid for a newer runner.  Couple that with not being able to make it past 2 miles, and it's a pretty clear picture that they are running too hard.  If someone is truly not capable of running more than 2 miles, they sure as heck aren't going to cover it at 9:30 pace.

       

      I started out RACING 2 miles at 13:00 pace.  I've experienced a considerable range.

       

      I will agree that, past that, it is highly personal, which is why I declined to give a firm recommendation and only a starting point as to what the OP should try.

      "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

       

        Spaniel has it right.  I could barely run a half mile when I started.  Then I slowed down and was able to keep going.  How slow is slow?  In my case, I ran a 19 minute mile on one particularly slow day.  Now my easy runs are 9.5 to 10 MPM, fast aerobic runs are 9 MPM, and tempo runs at 7:30 to 8:30 per mile depending on how I'm feeling.  But I've been running for ten years now.  And I count runs of 15 miles or longer as "long".

         

        Go slow to go far.

        Go far to build endurance.

        Endurance gives you the foundation to go fast.

          great majority of my runs are around the 9:30 range & I've been running consistently for a few years, so would highly agree with Spaniel that 9:30 is a very good pace for most new  runners running 2-3 miles.   everyone is dlifferent & can handle different ranges of stress.  OP is up to 2.5 max but may need  to slow down pace abit to stretch out duration/mileage. I'm abit confused about the wording of the title of this  thread & the wording in the body of his original post.  up to 2.5 miles vs "can only run 2.5 miles max)  if can only run 2.5 miles max then slow down to get to 3 or 3.5 miles

           

          anyway congrats Jwall on quitting smoking &  what you have been doing so far!!

           

           

          I would disagree with the characterization of my advice as arbitrary.  9:30 pace is very, very solid for a newer runner.  Couple that with not being able to make it past 2 miles, and it's a pretty clear picture that they are running too hard.  If someone is truly not capable of running more than 2 miles, they sure as heck aren't going to cover it at 9:30 pace.

           

          I started out RACING 2 miles at 13:00 pace.  I've experienced a considerable range.

           

          I will agree that, past that, it is highly personal, which is why I declined to give a firm recommendation and only a starting point as to what the OP should try.

          jwall5352


            Thank you for the feed back everyone, it is greatly appreciated.  Starting tomorrow I will test out a new pace and see how it goes Smile

            jwall5352


              Thank you EVERYONE for all the advice.

               

              I slowed my pace down to an average of 11 minutes and 9 seconds per mile and I was able to run 4.25 miles.

               

              I feel so accomplished, thank you Smile


              A Saucy Wench

                Your 9:30 pace is too fast.  Someone who can run that fast should not be physically limited to such a short distance.  Slow down.  It may seem counter-intuitive, but to get to where you can run faster over a distance you do not need to train faster; it is more important to run further even if it is at a slower speed.  Longer, easy runs do way more to build your cardiovascular system than these shorter, hard efforts you are doing now.  There is a place for that say once per week, but most of your runs should be easier and longer.

                 

                This is a typical issue with newer runners.  Just slow down so you can run further, even if you find the slower pace boring or depressing.  You should be able to talk with someone at your easy pace.  Over time, covering more miles will allow you to start speeding up but at less effort than before.

                 

                That is all you need to know

                I have become Death, the destroyer of electronic gadgets

                 

                "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - dd, age 7

                  And one more runner learns about the importance of slowing down.  Congratulations!

                   

                  Since the OP wants to run a half marathon, here's the next bit of information:  When you can run 10 miles, you are ready to run a half marathon.  Before my first half marathon, I did a 10 mile long run at 10 MPM, and a 13 mile long run where I walked the last two miles.  Then I ran the half marathon at 9 MPM.


                  Feeling the growl again

                    And another one is bitten. Smile

                     

                    Thank you EVERYONE for all the advice.

                     

                    I slowed my pace down to an average of 11 minutes and 9 seconds per mile and I was able to run 4.25 miles.

                     

                    I feel so accomplished, thank you Smile

                    "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                     


                    Mostly Harmless

                      Thank you EVERYONE for all the advice.

                       

                      I slowed my pace down to an average of 11 minutes and 9 seconds per mile and I was able to run 4.25 miles.

                       

                      I feel so accomplished, thank you Smile

                       

                      This is great! I wish I would have learned this lesson as quickly as you have.  It would have saved me all sorts of trouble.  My first year of running was plagued by injuries because I couldn't/wouldn't take this advice.

                       

                      Congratulations on quitting smoking! Even if you never run another step, you have taken a huge leap toward a healthier and happier life.  But you already know that or else you wouldn't have quit. Smile

                       "Address the process rather than the outcome.
                      Then, the outcome becomes more likely." - Robert Fripp

                      jwall5352


                        By the way guys, I went running today, kept up the rough 11 minutes to 11:30 per mile pace, and was able to run 5.25 miles.

                         

                        I feel as though I could have went for 6 miles though, I was tired of course but by no means winded at all, I could have continued..  Should I just keep going until I find my maximum for now or?

                         

                        I know I'm not over exerting myself as well.

                          Currently training for a half marathon at the end of Sept. after not running at all for 28 months. Think Jumanji Rino for my running. Add miles slowly to your long run 10% is about right to avoid injury. Find a running club in your area and join.

                           

                          Here in Columbus Indiana we are using a set schedule. Bing Mill Race Marathon and click on training schedules.  I never smoked, but flew a desk for far too many years. Stage 2 hypertension and Type 2 Diabetes. Last Friday I gave up the desk. Running and water aerobics every other day with rest days as needed. 270 lbs looking for 190 to 195 and getting off the hypertension med. So far so good with the Diabetes meds. 10 years this Nov and no meds.

                           

                          Bing 21 you are starting a life ling run to better health. MORE POWER TO YOU!!!!

                          To paraphrase an old poster: Today is the first day of the rest of your training. It doesn’t matter where you started or how far you’ve come. Today is the day. Your training didn’t start 6 weeks ago. Your training started the last time you hit the road. John “the Penguin” Bingham Life is not tried, it is merely survived if you're standing outside the fire


                          Mostly Harmless

                            Should I just keep going until I find my maximum for now or?

                             

                             

                            I think you should keep at it, but be careful about pushing too hard too quickly.  By dropping your pace you have found that you can run much further than you could before.  I'm sure this is really exciting for you and the last thing you want to hear is anything that will dampen your enthusiasm, but you need to be careful right now to avoid injury.  Don't add a lot of miles too quickly.

                             

                            For experienced runners adding miles in training for a race, the rule of thumb is to only increase your weekly mileage by no more than 10%.  I expect that you have far exceeded that 10% this week and that's probably OK.  My 2 cents would be for you to hold steady for a few weeks to see how your body responds.  If all is well, think about adding one speed session per week to your training and bumping your miles up a little bit.  If something starts to hurt, then cut back.  If all is well, keep going.

                             "Address the process rather than the outcome.
                            Then, the outcome becomes more likely." - Robert Fripp

                              Don't know about anyone else. But this screams, HR training. If someone has no idea how fast or how slow they should run, strap a HR monitor on (with a nice shiny new Garmin) and you'll know exactly how hard or (not hard) you'll be running. Plus you'll have a definite metric to see how your fitness is improving....

                               

                              Look at some of the Garmin refurb deals from BuyDig that seem to pop-up every now and then. You might be able to snag a 210 or 310xt with HRM for ~$130. The Garmin with HRM would be the most valuable tool you could get yourself. (Unless you already have one).

                              jwall5352


                                I actually already have a polar ft40. Or maybe ft5. Idk i forget which model exactly.  What should my target heart rate be? Like 70% max heart rate?

                                 

                                when I did insanity, the high interval training program, the target heart rate was 70 to 80% max hr. Not sure what it should be for running

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