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Salazar interview. (Read 616 times)

    Interesting listen. http://competitorradio.competitor.com/2012/12/alberto-salazar-2/

     

    Some things he apparently advocates/believes for his athletes (in no particular order):

     

    • Lift heavy
    • Run as much as you can without breaking down, then add cross training.
    • Run on soft surfaces (marathoners will need to do some running on the roads)
    • Running on hard surfaces deadens the legs and increases injury risk.
    • Altitude is important.
    • Stretch
    • Do core conditioning
    • Do drills
    • Sleep well, eat well, take the right supplements

    And for people who are just interested in general health and condition  30 mins running a day and a bit of weight training is fine.

      Interesting listen. http://competitorradio.competitor.com/2012/12/alberto-salazar-2/

       

      Some things he apparently advocates/believes for his athletes (in no particular order):

       

      • Lift heavy
      • Run as much as you can without breaking down, then add cross training.
      • Run on soft surfaces (marathoners will need to do some running on the roads)
      • Running on hard surfaces deadens the legs and increases injury risk.
      • Altitude is important.
      • Stretch
      • Do core conditioning
      • Do drills
      • Sleep well, eat well, take the right supplements

      And for people who are just interested in general health and condition  30 mins running a day and a bit of weight training is fine.

       

       

      I'm looking forward to listening to this.  I am especially curious about the "lift heavy" advice. 

      Have you qualified for Boston? I want to interview you!

      Message me!

       

      www.miloandthecalf.com

       

        One thing I forgot to include:

         

        One or two months a year are "off or just jogging".

          I'm looking forward to listening to this.  I am especially curious about the "lift heavy" advice. 

           

          According to someone over at letsrun they do squats with 3-4 sets of 6 reps to failure. So you chose the max weight that you can manage for that.

           

          I do squats but I tend to do 3x10 reps, and it's not really to failure. To be honest I get nervous about putting heavier weights on the bar, but maybe I should give it a try...

            According to someone over at letsrun they do squats with 3-4 sets of 6 reps to failure. So you chose the max weight that you can manage for that.

             

            I do squats but I tend to do 3x10 reps, and it's not really to failure. To be honest I get nervous about putting heavier weights on the bar, but maybe I should give it a try...

             

             

            I look at Rupp's twiggy legs and have a hard time seeing him squatting heavy on a regular basis.  But maybe that's just physiology? 

            Have you qualified for Boston? I want to interview you!

            Message me!

             

            www.miloandthecalf.com

             

              I look at Rupp's twiggy legs and have a hard time seeing him squatting heavy on a regular basis.  But maybe that's just physiology? 

               

              "Heavy" is of course heavy for your current strength - the point is that you lift as much weight as you can, but you're only doing a few reps. Quite a lot of people (especially runners) do lots of reps at low weights, but that's exactly what Salazar is saying is the wrong thing - or at least not as good as doing higher weights at lower reps.

               

              Seb Coe also did a lot of quite heavy lifting and he was very skinny (and super fast).

               

              Weight training really doesn't mean that you necessarily bulk up. To gain weight - muscle included - you need a good calorie surplus. If you're putting in the miles and eating sensibly then weight training isn't going to turn you into an Arnie look-alike. Body builders go out of their way to have a calorie surplus - especially protein. And of course many of them (like Arnie) take steroids to help with the muscle gain.

                 

                 

                Weight training really doesn't mean that you necessarily bulk up. To gain weight - muscle included - you need a good calorie surplus. If you're putting in the miles and eating sensibly then weight training isn't going to turn you into an Arnie look-alike. Body builders go out of their way to have a calorie surplus - especially protein. And of course many of them (like Arnie) take steroids to help with the muscle gain.

                 

                 

                Some of this is also individual, isn't it? I did crossfit style workouts for a while and realized I'm an "easy gainer".  I look at a squat rack and I get bigger.  I doubt Rupp has that issue. 

                Have you qualified for Boston? I want to interview you!

                Message me!

                 

                www.miloandthecalf.com

                 

                J-L-C


                  Some of this is also individual, isn't it? I did crossfit style workouts for a while and realized I'm an "easy gainer".  I look at a squat rack and I get bigger.  I doubt Rupp has that issue. 

                   

                  You can't put on weight if you're staying calorically balanced or running a deficit.

                   

                  You can do a lot of strength work and gain strength without additional muscle mass if you pay attention to diet as well. I'm sure Rupp is on top of that.

                  J-L-C


                    I agree this was a wonderful interview. Great questions posed. I love hearing about stuff like this. Really intriguing to hear Salazar give more detail about things.

                     

                    Also interesting his position on science and technology and how he's glad people scoff about it because it'll be five years before they start adopting it and by then he'll have moved on to the next leading edge. He's committed to excellence and it's pretty cool to behold.

                    J-L-C


                      I look at Rupp's twiggy legs and have a hard time seeing him squatting heavy on a regular basis.  But maybe that's just physiology? 

                       

                      Salazar says other people have commented on his sprinting and overall athleticism. He says Rupp is just super, super athletic.

                       

                      I'm sure he's got gobs of strength in those muscle fibers.

                        Thanks for posting this. Interesting interview.

                        "So many people get stuck in the routine of life that their dreams waste away. This is about living the dream." - Cave Dog
                        ShuffleFaster


                          Salazar also touches on the "how much is too much ?"running question.  Very interesting.