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Coming back after injury (Read 73 times)

FlippyNoodle


Not a dude

    I've had nagging injuries - IT band and hip abductors - for months and am now in PT to correct the muscle weaknesses, imbalances, and tightness that contributed to those injuries (IT bands, hip abductors, hip flexors, quads, hamstrings, and piriformis). It seems to be helping. I think I'm ready to try to run again, but previous attempts to come back over the past couple of months resulted in setbacks. Maybe I wasn't ready then or maybe I tried to come back too quickly. My log tells the story of how dramatically my mileage has been reduced since January.  How do I know if I'm really ready? Any advice for how to rebuild?

    Jan26.2


      I was off for about a week with similar issues (ITB, hip bursitis...). My sports chiro had me start with a 2 miler, then a day off, then a 3 miler, day off... ). I continued doing that for a week (runs no longer than 3 miles, then each week added a mile, still going every other day. When I hit 5 miles and was doing well, he said I could continue to add a mile per week to my LRs, and cautioned me to vary the lengths and speeds of all runs. He's a huge proponent of running every other day, which is what I'll continue to do until I'm sure the injury is completely gone.

      PR's: 5k - 23:33/ 10k - 48:30/ 5 mi. - 39:21/ 13.1 - 1:53/ 26.2 recent - 4:34

       

      Upcoming races: Resolution Run HM 1/1/13

                                  Phoenix R&R    HM 1/20/13

      Jan26.2


        I was off for about a week with similar issues (ITB, hip bursitis...). My sports chiro had me start with a 2 miler, then a day off, then a 3 miler, day off... ). I continued doing that for a week (runs no longer than 3 miles, then each week added a mile, still going every other day. When I hit 5 miles and was doing well, he said I could continue to add a mile per week to my LRs, and cautioned me to vary the lengths and speeds of all runs. He's a huge proponent of running every other day, which is what I'll continue to do until I'm sure the injury is completely gone.

        PR's: 5k - 23:33/ 10k - 48:30/ 5 mi. - 39:21/ 13.1 - 1:53/ 26.2 recent - 4:34

         

        Upcoming races: Resolution Run HM 1/1/13

                                    Phoenix R&R    HM 1/20/13

          I have had an aching ankle since February so I have tryed a few different things which seem to be working :

           

          I will run two 5k runs several hours apart instead of one 10k run. This not only helped me recover and have a rest in between pavement pounding but I was also able to run my dailiy distance at faster 5k paces.

           

          I went from 5 days a week down to 3-4 days.  On my sore days I will make sure to run every other day and get a full day rest in between.

           

          I cut out most downhill training, but If I am downhilling I slow my pace big time.

           

          All you can do is listen to your injuries and see if they are improving or getting worse.  That fine line is very tough to find but try to stay on the improving side heheh good luck and be safe!!

            5k  = 19.48 10/1/13

          10k  = 45.28 4/16/13

          Half Marathon = 1:37.16 9/08/13

          Operation Jack Marathon 12/26/12  4:39.11

          Solo O Marathon 06/02/13  3:52:10

          Operation Jack Marathon 12/26/13 3:40.34


          Running Chick

            I had to post this as i read through all these posts and felt everyone's anxiety over their injuries.... sigh....  So I wanted to share this with you - it's an article i wrote recently for some local boston newspapers and also published on my website.

            http://www.chantelwilsonchase.com/2013/03/when-injury-comes.html#more

             and although this doesn't answer the direct questions of how to fix problem X or problem Y, as a runner for over 40 years, this little bit of info I sincerely hope will help all my running friends running on and running with injuries.  love.  

            FTYC


            Faster Than Your Couch!

              I think your running schedule is too much of the "weekend warrior" type, with very short runs during the week, and way longer runs on the weekends. IMHO, this might be the cause for your troubles.

               

              You could try running more consistently, with longer runs during the week (start with 2-3 miles, perhaps some walking included in the beginning, then work up to 4-8 miles), and shortening your "long" runs to about 1.2 to 2 times the distance of your usual runs.

              Run for fun.

              FTYC


              Faster Than Your Couch!

                On the "how to come back", here's what worked for me:

                 

                I started out running, ran as long as I felt comfortable, then walked until I felt recovered, then ran again, walked, ran the rest (back, or finish a loop,...).

                Each time, I tried to make the first run segment longer (which worked often, but not every time, of course there were setbacks every now and then), and walk shorter, then start the second stretch of running at the same point again as the first time. Try to go longer on this second segment, too, if you feel like it, otherwise, walk as needed. Keep the overall distance the same, don't increase yet.

                 

                Then try to connect the two running segments (you might need to walk a bit again every now and then), trying to keep running for as long as you feel good (perhaps the whole second segment). Walk, then run the rest, as needed.

                 

                Over this whole period, keep the overall distance somewhat the same (maybe 3 miles?), or just increase very slowly.

                Eventually, you'll run about 3-4 miles consistently, then you can start increasing the overall distance for maybe 1-2 runs per week (this will be your "long" runs), keeping the other runs still the same.

                Then increase the length of each run, just slightly, by about 1/2 to 1 mile, keep the "long" run the same.

                Then increase the long run a bit, by 1-3 miles.

                 

                Make sure you run 3-4 times a week. Too often will put too much stress on your legs, less often might result in a lack of buildup.

                Increase distance only if you feel very comfortable with the usual distance. Cut back when you feel pain or discomfort beyond the normal range.

                Run for fun.


                Refurbished Hip

                  Flippy, I'm happy to see this, and I'm so glad that PT seems to be working for you!

                   

                  I've been doing every other day.  I think these rest days in between are really important.  My base was a lot higher than yours when I stopped running, but I was also out a long time.  You can check out my log if you're curious.  Lots of short runs.