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Running in the snow/slush (Read 1588 times)

    I recently had my first experience with running in wet snow, and it wasn't so bad except for the soaking wet (and cold) shoes/socks after a few miles. I've read lots of advice on the interwebs on everything from neoprene socks to rubbing cayenne pepper on your feet to keep them warm. What say you guys? I usually run in Brooks Adrenalines, and they just released a Goretex trail version. I was going to buy these and some gaiters,  but I see surprisingly few people suggest waterproof shoes as a solution. Is this because it makes your feet sweat and traps the moisture in the shoe or what? I tried the plastic bag trick in the summer, but it was a pain and my foot slid around in my shoe too much. I'm looking at distances anywhere from 5-20 miles over the winter. Are the goretex shoes a waste of money? 


    Fat butt on couch

      Not sure where you're located, but I've run in lots of bitter conditions....years in the far north reaches of northern Michigan on Lake Superior....and I've never done anything but cheap cotton socks and normal running shoes.  A mile or so and the feet are warm and stay that way.  Now if you're running constantly in several inches of icy slush that may be a different story, but I was never wading in the stuff.

       

      Anything waterproof will just hold in sweat and make the situation worse.

      "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

       

        I like wool socks (esp Smartwool socks) when running in slushy or wet conditions. The wicking makes it a little more comfortable.

        "Don't feel like running today...suck it up and run ...you're an athlete." (John Stanton, founder & owner of The Running Room)

         

        "The person who starts the race is not the same person who finishes the race."

          saucony razors help, but once i put those on, it's hard to call what i'm doing 'running'. For the hard frozen stuff, screw shoes are great.

            saucony razors help, but once i put those on, it's hard to call what i'm doing 'running'. For the hard frozen stuff, screw shoes are great.

             

             

            Yeah I guess the ice is a whole other issue. I haven't tried that yet. 

              Not sure where you're located, but I've run in lots of bitter conditions....years in the far north reaches of northern Michigan on Lake Superior....and I've never done anything but cheap cotton socks and normal running shoes.  A mile or so and the feet are warm and stay that way.  Now if you're running constantly in several inches of icy slush that may be a different story, but I was never wading in the stuff.

               

              Anything waterproof will just hold in sweat and make the situation worse.

               

              I'm in Denver. It's not that extreme. I haven't been up here that long and haven't run in the snow yet, so I think it was probably as much mental as physical just knowing that it was snowing/sleeting like crazy and my shoes and socks were getting squishy. I stopped at 12 miles when the trail looped back near my house rather than keep going and getting miles from my house again and realizing I made a mistake. 

                Another vote here for saving your money.  If you run through that sort of stuff enough, your feet are going to get wet, and the problem with goretex is that it doesn't drain (which is crucial). 

                 

                I run in those kinds of conditions for a good part of the year, and I find that it works to just throw on an old pair of trainers and suffer through it.  After the first mile my feet stay pretty warm.  If you're going to be out there for a while, you might consider trail shoes with decent drainage. 

                "Because in the end, you won't remember the time you spent working in the office or mowing your lawn.  Climb that goddamn mountain."

                Jack Kerouac

                  I've run the last two winters in Brooks Adrenaline ASR5 shoes.  I use gaiters and Walmart work socks instead of running socks.  I have run 20 milers in temperatures as cold as 20 below zero in these shoes. 

                   

                  I had a wet shoe problem only once.  I was running on thin ice and went through into a foot of water.  Had to stop and wring out my socks.  Other than that, I have had good luck running in snow, bare pavement, and on ice. 

                    I have permanently cold feet, so I'm the exception.  I simply cannot just wear cotton socks.  What I've found best is workman's socks (they are generally wool).  I get mine at Zellers, equivalent to the USA Target.  Usually not much more $$ than regular socks, which with my income is crucial.  That said, I only wear those for really cold temps, tonight my feet got soaked but it was decently warm so I only wore regular socks.  

                    'No matter how slow you go, you're still lapping everyone on the couch'

                     

                    "Running is a big question mark that's there each and every day. It asks you, 'Are you going to be a wimp or are you going to be strong today?'"  - Peter Maher

                     

                    "Running long and hard is an ideal antidepressant, since it's hard to run and feel sorry for yourself at the same time. Also, there are those hours of clearheadedness that follow a long run."  -Monte Davis

                      So it sounds like everyone agrees the socks are more important than the shoes. Thanks, I'll go spend 15 bucks on socks instead of 120 on shoes. Jrmichler, what gaiters do you have? The main prob I had this weekend was the splashing onto the top of my shoes...I guess the gaiters would help there.


                      day after day sameness

                        To me, aiming for dry feet in slush or wet snow and/or melting snow is the same as trying to find a way to run in the rain and not have your feet get wet.  Not likely.  So I just plan on the wet feet from the slush and use wool socks. 

                        I've done my best to live the right way; I get up every morning and go to work each day...


                        Oh roo roooo!

                          To me, aiming for dry feet in slush or wet snow and/or melting snow is the same as trying to find a way to run in the rain and not have your feet get wet.  Not likely.  So I just plan on the wet feet from the slush and use wool socks. 

                           

                          My thoughts exactly!  Wool socks and the heat generated by a moving body can do AMAZING things as far as keeping your feet warm enough. 

                            So it sounds like everyone agrees the socks are more important than the shoes. Thanks, I'll go spend 15 bucks on socks instead of 120 on shoes. Jrmichler, what gaiters do you have? The main prob I had this weekend was the splashing onto the top of my shoes...I guess the gaiters would help there.

                             

                            I use "Running Funky" gaiters from zombierunner.com.  They keep out the splashing onto the tops of my shoes. 

                             

                            If I'm running in snow deeper than 6 inches or so, a little snow will creep in underneath.  Only a little, not enough to bother me. 


                            MM #5616

                              Hey Greenrunning, I'm in Colorado, too, and our winters usually have pretty dry snow.  Just try to avoid the slushy bits and you'll be fine.  I do like trail shoes in the winter, since the minimalist shoes I wear in the summer don't keep any moisture out at all.  Also, I use yaktrax in the winter, and the trail shoes are stiffer so the yax don't pinch my toes. 

                              I hammered down the trail, passing rocks and trees like they were standing still.

                                I have thoughts on socks too. My favorite for wet conditions is wool. I have also like DryMax too but wool is better.

                                 

                                I guess I disagree with Spaniel. In truly wet and cold conditions, I have worn socks, covered by a plastic bag, covered by another pair of socks. I have been pleased whenever I have done this.

                                John
                                www.wickedrunningclub.com
                                I run to clear my head and talk to my friends.

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