1

do you guys... (Read 731 times)

    add millage on to your courses because of the fact that the maps dont take hills and such into account? If so how much and how?
    vicentefrijole


      I haven't done this... it gets too complicated and inaccurate for me. I would be more likely to just write that in the comments section and then adjust my "effort" level accordingly. However, maybe Eric would consider adding something about hills into the "surface" description in the "new course" menu or underneath the "weather" in the new run entry menu? There may be a nice way to handle this. Honestly, it hasn't bothered me to ignore it, but I also live in a very flat city where hills are virtually nonexistant!
        No, I haven't done this either. I do put a note in about it being hilly, but that's it. Then again, I choose my route based on how I'm feeling that day, so 1/10 a mile difference isn't that big of a deal to me. Janell

        Roads were made for journeys...

          I haven't done this either. It would involve math for me, which would just complicate life & confuse me! Confused I have multiple hilly routes & like Janell, I choose my route/distance according to my mood & how I feel, so a tenth or two doesn't seem to make much difference.
          So do not get tired and stop trying. - Hebrews 12:3


          A Dance with Monkeys

            The math favors NOT adding distance. For example, if you were to run a route that has an average 10% grade for one mile, the total distance is about 1.004 miles, applying Pythagorean theorem. A 10% grade is a significant climb, the likes of which can be found on Pike's Peak, but not most other places Wink, at least not for a sustained mile. Or, to be more detailed- gmaps are all horizontal distances. Lets say you run a mile horizontal at a 10% grade. How far did that 10% grade add? A^2 + B^2 = C^2. Let A = horizontal distance, B = climb, C = distance actually run. We also know that % grade = rise/run x 100, or B/A x 100. A = 5280 feet B = 0.1 * A = 528 feet C = sqrt((5280^2) + (528^2)) = 5306 feet So, by climbing a 10% grade for a whole horizontal gmap mile, you have added 26 feet. That is an additional 0.4%. Not worth it to me.
              The math favors NOT adding distance. <snip> So, by climbing a 10% grade for a whole horizontal gmap mile, you have added 26 feet. That is an additional 0.4%. Not worth it to me.</snip>
              Geek! Tongue Wink

              Roads were made for journeys...


              A Dance with Monkeys

                I have been so called. That and I am tapering this week, so I have nothing better to do. Life is easier when running...at least it is simpler... Wink
                  Trent, Thanks for the mathematical explanation. I do like to get the actual distance to be as accurate as possible. I could think of two reasons why elevations are not taken into consideration. First, the elevation sampling is not frequent enough. Although it gives a good sense of the terrain, the sampling rate is not high enough to produce an accurate picture. The second one is more critical than the first, and that is this method of creating maps is inherently inaccurate. You have to zoom all the way in, create the map using tiny increments such that you hug every curve, and use the satellite view in order to get fairly accurate distances. I think only a handful of users have the patience to do this. eric Smile


                  A Dance with Monkeys

                    I think only a handful of users have the patience to do this.
                    Sounds familiar. Did I mention, I have been called a geek in the past Wink I gotta get out and run some more. 12 more days...
                      Sounds familiar. Did I mention, I have been called a geek in the past Wink I gotta get out and run some more. 12 more days...
                      Didn't we just do this? Smile You're not the only geek out there. It was just an easy target. I thought about doing the math myself and decided that the answer would be too small to be worth my trouble... Geek! Wink

                      Roads were made for journeys...


                      A Dance with Monkeys

                        Didn't we just do this? Smile too small to be worth my trouble...
                        It sure is too small...only about half a percent.