12

Recommended training progs for the new and horribly unfit? (Read 1284 times)

Katew


    Hi everyone, I'm new to the board and new to running. Have spent my entire life convincing myself I'm rubbish at all things physical, but have recently discovered a love for running and am determined to work on it!! Problem is I don't really know where to start without doing myself an injury. I weigh 124lbs, and so far can run 20mins at a comfortable speed on the treadmill. Outside is another story though - concrete pavements are a killer! Can any of you more experienced types recommend a sensible starter programme for someone who intends to get serious about the sport? Thanks!
    littleturtlemama


      the couch to 5K program on coolrunnings.com seems to be a sensible, well-liked program Smile Jeff Galloway also has a run/walk training program on his website: http://www.jeffgalloway.com
        Outside is another story though - concrete pavements are a killer!
        Welcome. Any chance you can run on trails? Your legs would get a great workout and you would save your knees. And one warning, as many members here will probably agree with me, running is addictive. We tend to agree though it is a good addiction. Ewa
        I would rather wear out than rust out. - Helen Klein You create your own universe as you go along. - Winston Churchill
          Kate, I'm new to the boards as well, though not so new to running. If you can already run 20 mins pretty comfortable then you could probably run a 5k, so I'd skip the couch to 5k program. I would pick up a book at your local library. my favorite is Daniel's running formula, but Pete Pfitzinger and Hal Higdon (sp?) are also good as well. All the programs out there are going to very similar, but check out a bunch and pick the one that gels with you. I think the books are better then just finding a training program on the web, because the books will tell the science behind what your are doing so can understand what workouts you need to do and why you do them. If you really want to get serious you need to why you do things so you can start to tailor plans to your individual needs. Dan
            Co-worker turned me onto Hal Higdon. I read his book "Marathon", which provides more info about running than just how to run and train for a marathon. He also has a website with ton's of info and training programs for all types of races. There are many good training programs out there, bottom line find one that fits you and go for it. I have found having a set schedule laid out for me, help keep me honest and "makes" me get out there and run when before every other excuse in the world would have helped me not. It also helps to make your training log public so 1) it provides everyone the ability to review your training and help 2) it keeps you honest 3) its fun to watch your graph and list of runs grow 4) you can go back and see how far you have come or analyze what works and what doesn't.
              Hi everyone, I'm new to the board and new to running. Have spent my entire life convincing myself I'm rubbish at all things physical, but have recently discovered a love for running and am determined to work on it!! Problem is I don't really know where to start without doing myself an injury. I weigh 124lbs, and so far can run 20mins at a comfortable speed on the treadmill. Outside is another story though - concrete pavements are a killer! Can any of you more experienced types recommend a sensible starter programme for someone who intends to get serious about the sport? Thanks!
              Walking is an excellent replacement for running, especially on tough hill/mountain trails, where you will have a chance to work on your stabiliser muscles, increase your aerobic capacity and toughen your bones and joints. Remember that while it might take 3-4 weeks for your muscles to get used to a particular activity level, your bones and joints might need 6-8 weeks instead.
                I love researching programs for running and different ways of measuring progress. But if you are not into that, the best advice I have found is: • You should run no less than 20 mins • running for 1 hour is more beneficial than running twice for 30 mins (it has to do with metabolizing and training your muscles for endurance) • Alternate easy/hard/easy runs in terms of effort. easy should allow you to carry on a conversation, hard just a little more effort than that. Save the hard breathing stuff for races. • finally, if you are not enjoying your training, you are not doing it right. Make sure it is always a peasurable experience.
                Will be weightlifting and running to get into the best shape I can before turning 40. Here are my progress pictures: http://tinyurl.com/584qwt
                  I love researching programs for running and different ways of measuring progress. • running for 1 hour is more beneficial than running twice for 30 mins (it has to do with metabolizing and training your muscles for endurance)
                  That's not exactly true. Running twice a day has its advantages. You put less stress on your body so you can recover quicker and possibly put in more mileage and more or better quality work. Though most coaches agree that you don't need to start doubling until you are doing high mileage, say at least 50 a week or so.


                  Wasatch Speedgoat

                    Maffetone! http://www.myjjk.com/viewtopic.php?p=5296 http://www.duathlon.com/articles/1460 Here are many great articles on training: http://www.rrca.org/resources/articles/
                    Life is short, play hard!
                    Scout7


                    CPT Curmudgeon

                      Alright, here's the basics: o Being new, there is absolutely nothing wrong with mixing walking and running. o As you continue running, you will start to increase the time/distance spent running. As a safety limit, no more than 10% of the week's total volume. o You'll see a lot of terminology thrown about (LT, intervals, fartlek, GU, tempo, etc etc blah blah blah ad nauseum). For now, you don't need to be real concerned about a whole lot of it. o Get a decent pair of running shoes. Go to a real running store that specializes in running, have them watch you run, and don't feel bad about trying on as many shoes as necessary to find the right ones. o Listen to your body. It knows a lot. If it's tired, it'll tell you. If it's not happy, it'll tell you. Aches and pains are part of running. Sharp stabby pains are not. Learn the different messages your body is telling (random gripes about exercising vs. real problems). This is invaluable as you start to run more. o Ask lots of questions. No matter how silly it seems, someone, somewhere, probably has the same question as you, and is afraid to ask it. Don't be. We all started somewhere. This board is probably one of the nicest I've ever come across. I haven't seen anyone jump on anyone else (except in a light-hearted, fun manner). The people here are knowledgeable, and more than willing to share what they know with others. o Lastly, Jeff's a dirty hippie, JakeKnight's a smelly monkey. They're both mostly harmless.


                      madness baby

                        Don't be afraid to walk. Run for 20 minutes as you have been, walk for 5, then try to run for another 5 or so. Walking breaks are key for building up slowly. Good luck, it sounds like you're hooked!
                        deb
                        Katew


                          Thanks everyone, some really helpful tips there. Will be sure to give a few of them a go and see what works for me. Beat my personal best again today, easily. Had to force myself to stop...8 hours solid in a darkened classroom on a sunny day had me screaming for a run within minutes!! Seriously haven't felt this good since I discovered chocolate...it's true what they say about endorphins! Thanks again for the advice and happy running to you all.
                            o Lastly, Jeff's a dirty hippie, JakeKnight's a smelly monkey. They're both mostly harmless.
                            This is a bald-faced lie. Well, except for the part about Jeff being a dirty hippie. But everyone knows that. The rest of Scout's advice is good and simple. Just like Scout. Good. And simple. Run often (but take a day or two off, now and then. Run easy most of the time (easy enough to manage a conversation). Once every week or two, run longer than usual. Once or twice a week, run faster for a couple miles. Stay consistent. Slowly build your mileage. That's it. The whole program. No, I'm not putting the extra "e" on that word. That's almost as bad as putting an extra "u" in color. What's wrong with you Brits/Aussies/Kiwis, anyway? You'd think if you invented English, you'd spell it right. But I digress. Follow Scout's simple plan and ignore the rest for a year or two. And watch out for dirty hippies. And people that spell funny. Or smell funny. Most of all, have fun, and don't get hurt. Oh - and for the record, if you're already running 20 minutes "comfortably," you are light years away from being "horribly unfit." The horribly unfit guy is the one who collapsed in the first hundred yards, and he's back there waiting for you, puffing on a cigarette and hacking. You ain't even close to being him. He needs to get with the programme. I mean program. ---------------------------------- Scout - "mostly harmless?" Are you a closet Douglas Adams fan?
                            E-mail: JakeKnight2002@aol.com
                            -----------------------------

                              ...Jeff's a dirty hippie..
                              I resemble that remark. JK, you forgot the part about how you have to skip out on the Tom King Half Marathon because it's flat and fast and only run hilly, freezing, wooded courses like the Monkey and Frostbite. You missed a good shot at a PR today. And as for training, I'll just say that as I gain more experience in running I'm slowly overcoming the idea that to be fast you have to run hard every day. Much more important than effort in the short term is consistency over the long haul. Consistency is found by integrating running into the other aspects of your life--so that you can head out the door with some anticipation most days. Find that, and you'll have found your ideal training plan. I'm not saying just run easy--some days, for me, what creates anticipation is the idea that I'll have to run hard on the track. But that's me and that's what my running goals demand. Figuring out those two things: who am I? and what are my running goals? Those are up to you to experiment with. Good luck with the experiment--it's one worth making!
                                JK, you forgot the part about how you have to skip out on the Tom King Half Marathon because it's flat and fast and only run hilly, freezing, wooded courses like the Monkey and Frostbite. You missed a good shot at a PR today.
                                Don't remind me. I'm bumming more than a bit that I couldn't make it. If only for the cheerleaders and the medal. How about a little bragging, huh? Don't make me go check your log to see you did. Or should I just check the Tennessean tomorrow? (Assuming the local rag cares about such things ... maybe it'd be under Vandy making the Sweet 16 ...)
                                E-mail: JakeKnight2002@aol.com
                                -----------------------------

                                12