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Another shoe question (and sock) (Read 111 times)

Gizmo2019


    I have plantar fasciitis in the right foot. It’s been corrected by proper footwear, a night splint, and occasionally stretching. I’ve worn ASICS something when first started running again about a year and a half ago. Then my plantar fasciitis came back and I tried brooks Ravenna. It’s been about 7-8 mos and close to 500 miles so it’s time to change. I also wear vionics for everyday wear (a pair for inside the house and one for outside).

     

    thats a lot of cash!

    but it works. But asking if anyone recommends a particular running shoe for plantar fasciitis (both brands above worked fine).I always purchase from a local private business shoe store that watches your gait.

     

    im training for my first marathon and so far finding it true for me that I need a replacement every 6-7 mos.(400 miles).

     

    ive heard about buying more than one shoe at a time and rotating but not seeing how that SAVES money just delays the frequency of purchasing?

     

    ive read through some posts here and other articles & just wondering if I’m missing anything on how to not spend my kids college fund on my shoes.

     

    as soon as I’m done running I tear my shoes and socks off. But put them in a shoe closet. I heard about allowing them to dry properly?? I only run about 18-20 mi a week right now. Mostly treadmill.

     

    i heard of buying older models but where from? And how will I know if it’s good for my plantar if I buy online? I’m just inexperienced I guess.

     

    oh! I like balega socks.,,anyone like any other brands?

    Arnoldziffel


      I had a pretty bad case of plantar fasciitis several years ago, and it brought my running to a crawl for about 2-3 years.  I went to a podiatrist having self-diagnosed that I needed orthotics.  He agreed with the diagnosis, and it took me a while to get used to them.  I started running again, but soon after experienced the same sort of discomfort - and this went on for another year.  Once I felt the discomfort (sometimes in planter, sometimes in Achilles area), I would back off, then attempt to start up again.  One day it occurred to me that I used to be plagued by very tight calf muscles when I was training for marathons - so I began doing lots of calf muscle stretching very religiously, like a few times per day.  I mainly began doing a lot of heel raises (one foot at a time) from our brick fireplace - raising each heel high, and then low....nice and slow  It totally did the trick....as that was about 6 years ago.  I've now been able to re-ramp my mileage up again.  I do spend time each day stretching.  For the record, I wear Saucony ISO Triumph shoes.

        PF eventually takes care of itself, but it's a long process. Especially if you keep aggravating it. When I got PF, after a couple weeks of not being able to run without it getting a LOT worse, I went the isolation route. I got Hoka Stinson ATR shoes and Sole Dean Karnazes semi rigid insoles. That allowed me to run without making it worse, and after 2-3 months I was back to doing a few 10+ mile runs. After 4-5 months the pain of the semi rigid support insoles was worse than the PF, so I went back to the stock insoles. After 6 months it was gone.

         

        Big thick shoes like the Stinson or Bondi aren't very flexible, so there is a little less strain on the Plantar. The extra cushion takes the sting off the heel, and the rockered outsole moves the footstrike more to the midfoot and less on the heel. And the aftermarket inflexible insoles also keep the Plantar from moving much. It's SUPPOSED to move, it's an integrated shock absorption system. Think of the arch of your foot as a leaf spring on a car. Permanently preventing it from moving will just make it weak, so you don't want to live in aftermarket insoles and "custom orthotics" unless you have some sort of birth defect of the foot or have had an accident that has maimed your foot. But, keeping it from doing it's thing while the tissue heals up is a GOOD thing.

         

        The causes of PF vary from person to person, but for me it was too much speed work. Toward the end of healing up I got to the point where I could run for a couple hours with no hint of pain, but if I tried to do a 5k for time it would be back in the first mile, and very obvious the next morning.

         

        Yes, new shoes every 350-400 miles usually. Also, don't wear the same model all the time, rotate in different shoes, at least 3 different shoes in a week. Any overuse injuries caused by the shoe will amplify if you wear it all the time. Shoes are cheap if you know where to buy them, and what to get. You'd be surprised at the number of $150 shoes you can find for $30 at Ross or Marshall's. But don't get shoes that don't work for you just because they're cheap.

         

        Socks? I only wear Injinji.

         

        DO NOT FALL FOR THE CUSTOM FITTED INSOLE SCAM, YOU DO NOT NEED THEM, 99.9% OF PEOPLE DO NOT NEED THEM

        55-59 age group  -  University of Oregon alumni  -  Irreverent and Annoying

        haroldjiii


        wrongplace@thewrongtime

          My small suggestion is a bit of barefoot time around th house. Walking barefoot strengthens a lot of the foot muscles. That and single leg balances alternating sides really helped me (or maybe it was just time,... who really knows?

          Gizmo2019


            Thanks everyone. I do a bit of barefoot walking in the house. And single leg balance too (just started it actually but for my knees. Supposedly 🤷🏻‍♀️).

             

            I don’t THINK my calf muscles are tight (I’ve read about loosening them when I first had PF problems), but did all the stretches anyway. Although I only run 3-5 mi per day for now. I know that I need new shoes when the PF creeps back in. Usually it goes away with good (new) shoes and stretching.

            i will keep at the stretching tho as I’m assuming as my mileage goes up so will my risk of PF pain...?

             

            i did first try out those dr scholls inserts and it did not much for not very long. My PF is definitely hereditary but mostly from poor arch support in shoes, fast walking (running around the house and in life with 4 kids), constant standing, I think. Im also naturally pronated (pigeon toed) but not excessively and running and better shoes have improved that. So I think it’s all biomechanical.

             

            see I would LOVE to buy a $150 shoe for $30 but in places like Marshall’s and (haven’t been to Ross’s yet) Ross, you have to go store to store to pick through a bunch of choices to find the right size. Knowing me, I’d think “it’s a little tight but it’s THIRTY DOLLARS!!! Score.”

            it’s worth taking a look tho. I might get lucky.

             

            Thanks!

            Arnoldziffel


              I usually buy my running shoes on-line or at an outlet store.  Saucony used to have a great outlet store near me, but it closed down about 18 months ago.  I used to be able to buy a pair of shoes for $50-75 at this store.  I'm now buying my shoes on-line.  Last pair I bought was on-line through Zappos - and got my size 11 Saucony Triumphs for $55.  I never pay more than $100 for a pair of running shoes.  I typically retire my shoes between 300-350 miles.  I just feel like they are losing some cushion at that point.

               

              As far as my stretching theory for PF goes, the PF is connected to the Achilles which is connected to the calf muscle.  These three have very different degrees of elasticity.  In my case, tight calf muscles caused my PF and some occasional Achilles discomfort.  Extra calf stretching did the trick for me after trying all sorts other solutions. Everyone's body is different, but it helped me to consider my weakest link during the troubleshooting process.

                I have a "cheap shoe alert" thread in the gear section.

                 

                If you find a great deal, share it there.

                 

                Running Warehouse and  Eastbay Sports often have great clearance deals online. BUT you need to know what you want, because you can't virtually try them on. I'm a Skechers fan, and there's an outlet 1/2 mile from me. I stopped in today, and they have a bunch of Ride7 and GoRun6 for about $50-60, but that's double what I'd normally pay there. If they get down to $30 before they're out of my size I'll pick up some more pairs. Otherwise I'm waiting for the hyperburst midsole versions of the MaxRoad and Ride to come out this summer. I might even pay full price!

                 

                Road Runner Sports, as much as I despise their pushy salespeople, has a table full of slightly used shoes people brought back after a couple runs. About half off the full retail price.

                 

                REI always has sale shoes, AND don't forget your 20% off coupon if you're a member (that's how/why I bought Hoka Stinsons a few years ago for PF recovery).

                 

                Stretching: tendons are incapable of stretching. They rip apart before they stretch. Luckily they are very strong. Muscle tissue can stretch, but most old-school types of stretching actually cause them to react by stiffening and shortening. And a lot of recent studies have shown that stretching (especially BEFORE running) does absolutely nothing. I think ballistic stretches after warming up with a 5 minute jog can help, both from reading the studies and personal experience. Warming up is more important than stretching.

                55-59 age group  -  University of Oregon alumni  -  Irreverent and Annoying

                Gizmo2019


                  Ok , so I spent about 3-4 hrs (not straight) combing through the internet in shoes, researching good brands for PF, overpronation (if that’s what I have), and shoe size labels.

                   

                  and I’m empty! My husband said to not waste time but I think at least I learned that I’m too inexperienced in this. I think I’ll buy from the running store once more (I’d like to try a saucony now) and see what I like best. Another issue is some websites don’t reveal whether the shoe is wide or normal width. I need a wide. Then, I found an ASICS gt 2000 for $50 on some website but it’s a gt 2000 FIVE. Of course I look up reviews and see a lot more negative comments than positive.

                   

                  I HATE SHOPPING!

                   

                  but I also hate overpaying. Just like anything it seems ppl don’t like the upgraded versions of some models, or there’s fakes out there. I did find a saucony hurricane on Zappos for about $85 with free returns but I think I couldn’t tell if it was wide or normal.

                   

                  Bill, I have seen your cheap shoe alert thread before. Thanks that’s very useful. Ideally I’d like at least 2 pairs at a time both under $100. I’ll keep searching until I get the hang of this.

                   

                  Overall it seems to me that the brand doesn’t matter too much (for PF), and that stretching it out is the primary treatment rather than buying the right shoe to prevent. The ASICS gel nimbus wasn’t even on the majority of the internet lists for good shoes for PF. And the brooks Ravenna 9 was never mentioned.

                   

                  Good news is i purchased some injinji socks to try out.


                  rectumdamnnearkilledem

                    If you need a wide shoe, stick with men’s...or most NB styles are available in widths. Men’s med = women’s wide. I have men’s 7s and women’s 8.5 wides...both are a European unisex 40.

                    '19 Goals:

                    • 5/7/2019 - lung lobe removed w/colorectal met

                    • Continue showing Cancer that it's not welcome back. Ever.

                    • Improve power:weight ratio

                     

                    Getting the wind knocked out of you is the only way to

                    remind your lungs how much they like the taste of air.    

                         ~ Sarah Kay

                    Gizmo2019


                      If you need a wide shoe, stick with men’s...or most NB styles are available in widths. Men’s med = women’s wide. I have men’s 7s and women’s 8.5 wides...both are a European unisex 40.

                       

                      I am currently a 9.5 wide in ASICS and brooks. What size would I try in men’s?


                      rectumdamnnearkilledem

                         

                        I am currently a 9.5 wide in ASICS and brooks. What size would I try in men’s?

                         

                        An 8 might work. Generally I have to go down 1.5 sizes for equivalent. Double-check each manufacturer's size chart to see what would be comparable.

                        '19 Goals:

                        • 5/7/2019 - lung lobe removed w/colorectal met

                        • Continue showing Cancer that it's not welcome back. Ever.

                        • Improve power:weight ratio

                         

                        Getting the wind knocked out of you is the only way to

                        remind your lungs how much they like the taste of air.    

                             ~ Sarah Kay

                        Arnoldziffel


                          I did pay bust out retail at a running shoe store a few years ago - but that was because I was looking for some help after battling PF and wanted a professional opinion on the best show for me,.  But any shoes I've purchase since then, I just shop on-line or go to an outlet store - knowing full well the model and shoe size that I want.  Once I find a particular shoe that works for me, I generally stick with it.

                          Half Crazy K 2.0


                            If you have a Dick's Sporting Goods nearby, some of them have more popular running shoes out on shelves in a serve yourself way. You could try shoes on to see how they fit and then look for the best deal.

                             

                            DSW carries some running shoes, but you have to go through a lot of more lifestyle/not-really-running shoes to find them. Also Nordstrom Rack may have some, again, you have to dig.

                             

                            As far as bargains, I am lucky and live near the physical store for Holabird Sports. They tend to carry the current & the previous model of shoes. Their prices are great, in some cases even the current models are less than the LRS. If you are shopping on-line with them, you need to put the item in your cart to see the real price. Running Warehouse also tends to carry both current & previous models. You can usually find discount codes for them on-line.

                             

                            For finding a comprable size, if you look on the tongue of your current shoe, you will have usually 4 different sizes listed. The EU size will allow you to compare across models.

                             

                            As far as shoe width, I find it varies from model to model. Mizuno messed with my favorite (well, not any more) shoe, so I was trying on several shoes recently. In the same size, the Brooks Ravenna was way too narrow for me & squeezed my foot. The Launch and Ghost fit fine.

                              To be an honest a Good Person, if you go to your LRS and they help you decide on shoes, you should buy that pair THERE. If they work out well, you can buy subsequent pairs online.

                               

                              Our local store, Transports, has a very knowledgeable staff and competitive retail pricing. They also have good discounts on discontinued shoes. I've bought a few pairs there simply because I like them and want them to stay in business. Sure, I could have saved $10 online, but that's not the point.

                               

                              I've looked at those "best shoe for PF", "best shoe for AT" lists. They don't have any rhyme or reason to their selections, often they are just lists of best selling shoes, and many contradict each other, such as a minimalist shoe and a motion control shoe both on the list as being "best for PF". Personally, I think a less flexible shoe with a rocker sole would be best for rehabbing PF, thus my selection of the Hoka Stinson. Brooks Ghost might be good, but they didn't have enough cushion for me. And for our duck footed friends, Topo makes a fine ergonomic shoe. They are not "zero drop" like Altra, and seem to be better built. Altra has it's niche, but I think the zero drop puts strain on the PF/Achilles system.

                               

                              There's a good website called Doctors of Running that might have some info on selecting shoes that are good for PF or other ailments.

                              55-59 age group  -  University of Oregon alumni  -  Irreverent and Annoying

                              Sunflower747


                                I was just about to start a plantar fasciitis and running shoe thread and I see it's the first one listed here!

                                 

                                Similarly, I have plantar fasciitis in just my right foot.  I got insoles and it basically just went away for me (but I know everyones is different and this doesn't work for everyone).  Brooks in generally worked well but ghost is what I run in most often.

                                 

                                I was wondering if anyone could reccomend a good racing shoe for a marathon?  I bought the Nike 4% vaporfly and loved them.  I think they made me much faster in other races but made my plantar fasciitis come back.  I have been wearing my normal shoes now and it went away again but I'm unsure what I should wear for the marathon in two weeks.  Should I just wear my Brooks ghost during the race?  Maybe the levitate or something else?  What are some other faster shoes I could wear my insoles with?  They didnt fit in the 4%.  Thanks!

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