123

migraines (Read 1441 times)


A Dance with Monkeys

    One of my triggers is overhydration, strangely enough. Went for a run with one yesterday, it was gone by time I hit my last mile over an hour later Big grin


    My dogs are fast, not me

      I can't imagine running with one. Shocked I get so sick (puking, laying in the bathroom for hours sick) I can't even move, along with visual aura and losing the feeling in my left arm, plus a numb face. It's a week later and just thinking about the aura makes me nauseous again.
      Robin


      A Dance with Monkeys

        I can't imagine running with one.
        I had no choice...the pace bunny is on my tail and... Whose woods these are I think I know. His house is in the village, though; He will not see me stopping here To watch his woods fill up with snow. My little horse must think it queer To stop without a farmhouse near Between the woods and frozen lake The darkest evening of the year. He gives his harness bells a shake To ask if there's some mistake. The only other sound's the sweep Of easy wind and downy flake. The woods are lovely, dark and deep, But I have promises to keep, And miles to go before I sleep, And miles to go before I sleep.
          *Reviving a dead thread* So I had a pretty bad migraine hit today. Actually started last night, but didn't realize my aura symptoms till today when the nausea hit. Haven't had one for nearly a year, and this one seemed like it was going to be nasty. Forced myself to go out running after work, and sometime after mile 5, I started feeling a lot better. In fact when I got home I was feeling absolutely fine. Until... after the shower. Now I am starting to feel the visual sensitivity and a bit of a headache coming on again. Could the runner's high have temporarily blocked my migraine? Anyone else have any similar experiences?
          - Tony


          A Dance with Monkeys

            Yeppers. Running often extinguishes or suppresses my migraine. Sometimes it does return.
              Bummer... I thought I had found a new remedy Roll eyes
              - Tony


              A Saucy Wench

                hmmm dh GETS them from exercise. For him it seems to be related to low glycogen stores. His body doesnt transition to the fat burning zone well. His migraine doc says there is no correlation but EVERY time he gets one it is when he doesnt overfuel before a long ride. He is so freaking sick of gu and gatorade, but if he skips, he gets migraine.

                I have become Death, the destroyer of electronic gadgets

                 

                "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - dd, age 7


                Yoda the 4-eared cat

                  hmmm dh GETS them from exercise. For him it seems to be related to low glycogen stores. His body doesnt transition to the fat burning zone well. His migraine doc says there is no correlation but EVERY time he gets one it is when he doesnt overfuel before a long ride. He is so freaking sick of gu and gatorade, but if he skips, he gets migraine.
                  That's interesting, Ennay. I'm currently trying to keep a track of when I get migraines after running to try and identify a trigger. Anecdotally, I was leaning towards heat as a trigger as it mostly happens on hot days.The last one was on a Sunday morning, running for over an hour on a very small breakfast, so the fuel hypothesis could also be correct. My mum told me a friend of her's takes glucose when she starts getting the visual aura and that often heads off the headache. I've yet to try it.
                    That's interesting, Ennay. I'm currently trying to keep a track of when I get migraines after running to try and identify a trigger. Anecdotally, I was leaning towards heat as a trigger as it mostly happens on hot days.The last one was on a Sunday morning, running for over an hour on a very small breakfast, so the fuel hypothesis could also be correct. My mum told me a friend of her's takes glucose when she starts getting the visual aura and that often heads off the headache. I've yet to try it.
                    This is really interesting. I've noticed that I've gotten migraines after many of my long runs, the most recent being last Saturday's of 11 miles in god awful humidity. I also sometimes get them after my swims. I figured with the swimming it had something to do with my goggles being too tight or something (?). Maybe I'm underfueled?? Although I typically drink over 100 oz. of water a day and take water with me on long runs so I don't know how that could be possible. Maybe I'll try Gu or something next time.


                    Chicago RnR 1/2 Marathon

                      I suffered with migraines for years and they would often knock me out for 3 days. Finally realized milk was a trigger for me. Switched to soy milk and have only had one migraine in the past 2 years. I still keep my prescription meds just in case . . .


                      My dogs are fast, not me

                        That's interesting, Ennay. I'm currently trying to keep a track of when I get migraines after running to try and identify a trigger. Anecdotally, I was leaning towards heat as a trigger as it mostly happens on hot days.The last one was on a Sunday morning, running for over an hour on a very small breakfast, so the fuel hypothesis could also be correct. My mum told me a friend of her's takes glucose when she starts getting the visual aura and that often heads off the headache. I've yet to try it.
                        I get mine in the heat, but its from dehydration due to the excessive heat. I find if I start to get aura, chugging some gatorade helps a lot and seems to minimize the headache/symptoms.
                        Robin


                        Blaine Moore (MM#2867)

                          I have a bad history with migraines. I've gotten lots of different kinds of hallucinations, including the type that Trent linked to as a simulation way back when. I used to get cluster migraines, where I wouldn't get them for a few months and then I'd have 1 or 2 per week for a few months. The worst was going blind for 2 weeks in high school, with varying degrees of hallucinations from multiple migraines over the span. At least the headaches were almost tolerable. I don't take medication for them anymore. Too many miracle cures that have worse side effects than the migraine. (The worse side effect being an inability to breathe and having to be rushed to the ER for a jab from a needle the size of my arm.) My biggest triggers were stress and caffeine. I took caffeine completely out of my diet, and I learned to handle stress better, coupled with a few years of a daily dose of verapamil (generic form of Kalan I think?). The side effect of verapamil (which is one of the main reasons other people take it) is to lower blood pressure though, so I got off that as soon as I could, which often meant the migraines came back but after a few years I only get a few migraines now and then and the headaches are nothing compared to what I used to get as a kid. Now the only time I have caffeine is when I start hallucinating from the aura (coupled with a high dose of ibuprofen) which makes my stomach feel crappy but can speed up the hallucinations and headache so that they only last for an hour or so instead of for half the day.

                          Run to Win
                          24 Marathons, 17 Ultras, 16 States (Full List)



                            Ah, yes. Migraines are interesting birds. What triggers one for one person may sometimes be what makes it go away for another person. The way my neuro tells it, triptans actually work by making the attack come on so that you can "get it over with." Now they don't work for me b/c my body has now way oversensitized to them so they actually create a giant migraine that I cannot get over. I have to take a very small dose of a triptan with a giant prescription-strength NSAID when I have an attack. Migraines do tend to come and go in seasons--wont' have one for a year, then have them all the time for a few months. Sufferers should journal to find their triggers. Barometric pressure, lack of/excess sleep, and dehydration are some for me. Caffeine, nitrates, dairy, and hormonal fluctuations, which can be triggers for some, are not for me. My neuro put me on prescription meds but, like Blaine said, the goal is to taper off them as soon as possible. The side effects aren't desirable. BTW, this neuro (who is some sort of supposed migraine genius) says migraine suffers have more activity in some parts of the brain. For example, we have greater visual acuity. He says maybe in a few decades we'll be shown to have faster reflexes than non-sufferers. So yeah, Trent, we're smarter. Smile

                            Let us run with perseverance the race marked out for us. (Heb. 12:1b)
                            Mile by Mile

                              Another migraine sufferer here too. I get auras (visua, as well as the sensitivity to light and sound) and I just want to curl up in a cool, dark, quiet room and close my eyes. I do occasionally get them on long runs, and they do seem to be triggered by gu and gel. I actually get headaches from too much sugar quite often, and eating foods high in salt and/or protein help ease my symptoms. I don't run well when suffering from a migraine either. They make me nauseated and dizzy, which are 2 very bad things when running. My biggest trigger for migraines is my menstrual cycle though. I can always tell when Auntie Flo is coming for a visit, because I get a terrible migraine the day before.
                                I get migraines, sometimes with visual auras. My aura usually occurs as a "warning" sign earlier in the day that the headache will come later. I tried running one off once and ended up feeling I was going to die a painful death. The women in my family all get migraines, so I am guessing there must be a genetic (and hormonal) component. But, mine didn't start appearing consistently until I was hit head-on in a car collision when a jerk crossed the center line going 70 mph. And, for some reason, MSG in food triggers a migraine every time. Maxalt almost always works for me (sometimes I have to repeat a dose), but I have to take the pill and make the commitment to go to bed until it goes away. The frequency has decreased from about six-eight per month to once a month in the last few months, which I credit to running *fairly* regularly (yea!).

                                "Life is short... running makes it seem longer." - Baron Hansen

                                123