2023 The Waltons: Racing & Training Thread (Read 99 times)

ccoakley


    Zebano, I think it can be both.  I've had pretty awesome tempo runs when I'm really mad about something.  But on a day to day basis I'm finding I need to really actively manage my energy levels.  Not sure if it's still lingering long covid, getting older, or most likely both but my body is much less forgiving than it used to be.

    5k 24:53 (2020) |10k 52:24 (2021) |HM 1:57:14 (2019) |FM 4:24 (2007) |50k 5:57 (2022)

     

     

    Half Crazy K 2.0


       

      Glad to hear it! I'm always curious if running is stress relief for people or added stress.

       

      Both. Not sure if stressful is the right word, source of frustration over the lasat few years, definitely.

      Fredford66


      Running Musician

         

        Glad to hear it! I'm always curious if running is stress relief for people or added stress.

         

        My answer would be yes.  Running almost always makes me feel better - once I'm doing it and especially once I'm done.  Getting myself out the door, however, can increase my stress level when I'm feeling lazy or when I'm discouraged by weather or my own aches & pains.  DW is great with helping me get out there by reminding me I'm always glad once I go.

        5k 23:48.45 (3/22); 4M 31:26 (2/22); 5M 38:57 (11/22); 10k 49:24 (10/22); Half 1:48:32 (10/22)

        Upcoming race(s): Winter Series #5 Trail 10k, 2/4; E. Murray Todd Half, 3/12
        ccoakley


          For those of you with fancy Garmins that track such things....what's the fewest number of hours of suggested recovery you've ever gotten after a run?

          5k 24:53 (2020) |10k 52:24 (2021) |HM 1:57:14 (2019) |FM 4:24 (2007) |50k 5:57 (2022)

           

           

          Half Crazy K 2.0


            For those of you with fancy Garmins that track such things....what's the fewest number of hours of suggested recovery you've ever gotten after a run?

             

            On the treadmill it is usually 0 or 1.

            Fredford66


            Running Musician

              For those of you with fancy Garmins that track such things....what's the fewest number of hours of suggested recovery you've ever gotten after a run?

               

              I don't really know of any low readings, but my watch once went into cadence lock early in an easy 5-mile run and recommended 3 days of recovery.

              5k 23:48.45 (3/22); 4M 31:26 (2/22); 5M 38:57 (11/22); 10k 49:24 (10/22); Half 1:48:32 (10/22)

              Upcoming race(s): Winter Series #5 Trail 10k, 2/4; E. Murray Todd Half, 3/12
              zebano


                For those of you with fancy Garmins that track such things....what's the fewest number of hours of suggested recovery you've ever gotten after a run?

                 

                I have a Coros pace and just did a workout. Mine says "Ready for Easy Training, 9 hours until Hard Training" which is just absurd.

                1600 - 5:23 (2018), 5k - 19:33 (2018), 10k - 41:20 (2021), half - 1:38:57 (2018), Marathon - 3:37:17 (2018)

                zebano


                  Throwing another question out to the group. Does anyone do a true linear periodized approach to training? A nonlinear periodization basically means that for this microcycle (i.e. 3-4 weeks) you'd might focus on on lactate threshold but you'd still be touching on other paces like VO2 max, mile/800 speed and maybe sprinting. In a linear scheme all your workouts would be LT focused for that whole cycle.

                   

                  Jason Koop seems to recommend this in his book Training Essentials for Ultrarunning: How to Train Smarter, Race Faster, and Maximize Your Ultramarathon Performance  and I don't think I've ever seen a plan like that before.

                  1600 - 5:23 (2018), 5k - 19:33 (2018), 10k - 41:20 (2021), half - 1:38:57 (2018), Marathon - 3:37:17 (2018)

                  Fredford66


                  Running Musician

                    Throwing another question out to the group. Does anyone do a true linear periodized approach to training? A nonlinear periodization basically means that for this microcycle (i.e. 3-4 weeks) you'd might focus on on lactate threshold but you'd still be touching on other paces like VO2 max, mile/800 speed and maybe sprinting. In a linear scheme all your workouts would be LT focused for that whole cycle.

                     

                    Jason Koop seems to recommend this in his book Training Essentials for Ultrarunning: How to Train Smarter, Race Faster, and Maximize Your Ultramarathon Performance  and I don't think I've ever seen a plan like that before.

                     

                    That's far more complexity than I'm willing to deal with in my training.  I don't even do Jack Daniels' workouts because they have multiple paces and durations.  I'm happier keeping it simple, even though I know I might make more progress with the more complex plans.

                    5k 23:48.45 (3/22); 4M 31:26 (2/22); 5M 38:57 (11/22); 10k 49:24 (10/22); Half 1:48:32 (10/22)

                    Upcoming race(s): Winter Series #5 Trail 10k, 2/4; E. Murray Todd Half, 3/12
                    watsonc123


                      Although cycling, I suspect it would still apply for running.

                      There was a study over 12 weeks, where there were 3 groups that trained, consisting of easy biking and intervals.

                      Long intervals (~20 min)
                      Medium intervals (~10 min)
                      Short intervals (2-5 min range)

                      Groups 1 and 2 had 4 week training week stages split:
                      Group 1: Stage 1 long, Stage 2 medium, Stage 3 short
                      Group 2: Stage 1 short, Stage 2 medium, Stage 3 long

                      Group 3: did not have the four week stages.  Instead they just rotated through the workouts, e.g. Week 1 Long and medium, Week 2 short and long etc.

                      They then did performance and blood tests a week or two later post a taper week.  There was no difference in the results from either groups.

                      PRs: 5km 18:43 (Dec 2015), 10km 39:59 (Sep 2020), half 1:26:16 (Sep 2016), full 3:09:28 (Jun 2015)

                       

                      40+ PRs: 5km 19:31 (Oct 2020), 10km 39:59 (Sep 2020), half 1:29:39 (Jun 2018), full 3:13:55 (Sep 2022)

                      zebano


                        And Watson comes through! Thank you. That is exactly the question I was asking. Thank you. I'm going to guess that by no difference between the groups they mean "no statistical difference" but that's sufficient.

                        1600 - 5:23 (2018), 5k - 19:33 (2018), 10k - 41:20 (2021), half - 1:38:57 (2018), Marathon - 3:37:17 (2018)

                        Marky_Mark_17


                          For those of you with fancy Garmins that track such things....what's the fewest number of hours of suggested recovery you've ever gotten after a run?

                           

                          Maybe 6 hours once after a really short run when I'd had the previous day off?

                           

                          For reference it maxes out at 72 hours too hehehe.

                          3,000m: 9:07.7 (Nov-21) | 5,000m: 15:39 (Dec-19) | 10,000m: 32:34 (Mar-20)  

                          10km: 33:15 (Sep-19) | HM: 1:09:41 (May-21)* | FM: 2:41:41 (Oct-20)

                          * Net downhill course

                          Last race: Run the Point 10k, 27 Nov, 35:00, 1st overall

                          Up next: Clevedon Country Half Marathon, 5 Feb

                          "CONSISTENCY IS KING"

                          Marky_Mark_17


                             

                            Glad to hear it! I'm always curious if running is stress relief for people or added stress.

                             

                            Normally it's stress relief. I normally feel better and more clear-headed after a run. The exception to this has been when I'm ramping up training or coming back from sickness and things aren't quite clicking or something feels a little off. Then I tend to overanalyse it.

                            3,000m: 9:07.7 (Nov-21) | 5,000m: 15:39 (Dec-19) | 10,000m: 32:34 (Mar-20)  

                            10km: 33:15 (Sep-19) | HM: 1:09:41 (May-21)* | FM: 2:41:41 (Oct-20)

                            * Net downhill course

                            Last race: Run the Point 10k, 27 Nov, 35:00, 1st overall

                            Up next: Clevedon Country Half Marathon, 5 Feb

                            "CONSISTENCY IS KING"

                            Fredford66


                            Running Musician

                              I ran 7 today with 4 at HM pace.  While I was generally able to run at the target pace, the effort level was still a bit high, but there's been some definite improvement over the last two weeks, so I'll look at the glass as half full.  Too early to say whether I'll go back to track work next week.  We'll see how another few days of stretching and exercise go (though when they put the heat pads on my knee and hip at the PT office yesterday it felt so nice I wanted them on all the joints of both legs).

                              5k 23:48.45 (3/22); 4M 31:26 (2/22); 5M 38:57 (11/22); 10k 49:24 (10/22); Half 1:48:32 (10/22)

                              Upcoming race(s): Winter Series #5 Trail 10k, 2/4; E. Murray Todd Half, 3/12
                              ccoakley


                                For those of you with fancy Garmins that track such things....what's the fewest number of hours of suggested recovery you've ever gotten after a run?

                                 

                                Mine is almost always in the  20 hrs- 3 days range, I was really starting to wonder if single digits were even possible.  Good to know it is

                                5k 24:53 (2020) |10k 52:24 (2021) |HM 1:57:14 (2019) |FM 4:24 (2007) |50k 5:57 (2022)