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Orthotics - will they help (Read 1075 times)


Slow-smooth-fast

    Any of you give me any f/b regarding the use of orthotics? I have had a lot of knee pain over the past 4/5 months and have been seeing a physio. I thought all was better until I did my first long run for a while of 12 miles. I found that the pain came back and iI had to stop I have just bought some orthotics and am going to give them a try, what are your experiences with these? and do they really work? Cheers.

    "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009

    PWL


    Has been

      I use orthotics in all my running shoes. I have a higher arch and pretty much every sneaker out there doesn't have a high enough arch for me. That and the insoles that come with the sneakers are pretty much crap so adding orthotics helps add some arch and some cushion. I currently use two different types of orthotics: Shock Doctor sport orthotics Lynco L400 sport orthotics They have worked wonders for my knees and legs. There are lots of other options out there as well as the custom orthotics your podiatrist can make for you. Good luck! Yes

      "I would never die for my beliefs, because I might be wrong."--Bertrand Russell


      Slow-smooth-fast

        thankyou for the response, dumb question, but do i have to take out the current inner sole and replace it with the orthotics or leave it in also?

        "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009


        Needs more cowbell!

          thankyou for the response, dumb question, but do i have to take out the current inner sole and replace it with the orthotics or leave it in also?
          That's a good question. I think I may try some arch support insoles, but wonder if I put them on top of the regular insole in the shoe, or remove it...or is it a YMMV thing? k

          Kirsten - aka "Auntie Kirsten"

          '14 Goals:

          • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

          • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

          PWL


          Has been

            Take the existing insole out. This shouldn't be an issue since there are very few sneaker companies who still glue in their insoles. If you don't remove the insole, the shoe will probably end up being too tight and you'll end up with black toenails or blisters. The only exception to this is if you get a 3/4 length orthotic (one that doesn't go all the way to the toes). Be aware that you may get a little bit of heel slippage until the orthotic settles into the shoe since most orthotics are thicker than the existing insoles. Just don't do a 15-miler on the first day. Trial and error is still the best system I have found for orthotics. I have about six pair right now--two that work, four that didn't. I buy them, do a couple of 3-4 milers in them, then make a decision about them. Most orthotic manufacturers--New Balance, Lynco, Spenco--will come with unconditional guarantees ranging from 30 days to one year. So take them home, try them out, see how they work. You should be able to return them without too much of a problem (I rarely return them--if they don't work for running I will generally just put them in one of my casual shoes and call it good). Price range runs from $25 USD to $60 USD for a decent over-the-counter. Custom ones can bump you up to the $200-$400 range. Many good running shops will have good orthotics as well. Unless you are having serious, I-can-barely-walk/run-anymore issues, I would probably start with an over-the-counter one and then move up if you need to. Good luck! Smile

            "I would never die for my beliefs, because I might be wrong."--Bertrand Russell


            Slow-smooth-fast

              fantastic info, many thanks, cant wait for 6pmto roll round, got a nice 6 miler to try them out. Will let you know how i do.

              "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009

              jcasetnl


                Hey Eddy - I'm a big believer in orthotics nowadays. I am a mild pronator and a little on the heavy side. I'm about 5'11" and 190lbs (87 kilos). About a year or so ago I developed PF and did some research on the net. Among the suggestions I ran across for recovery was to get either an arch support or an orthotic. Since I'd always been curious about the orthotics and they include arch support, I figured I'd go that route. Another thing I recalled reading in several places was that the arch support elements built into the shoe are never sufficient if you suffer from pronation - you have to get a "dedicated" arch support, I read. I run almost exclusively on asics so I can't verify that. Maybe other shoes are better at controlling pronation. Anyway, after I got over the PF and started running again regularly, I noticed something else about my running - no more occasional pain in my knees! Knee pain *always* used to creep up on me from time to time, particularly when I started adding longer runs. re: the insole, the package recommended taking it out. I tried it both ways and preferred out. I got a second pair for my work shoes, so I'm on them all the time now. I think they worked wonders in my case because of my pronation. If you don't have motion control problems then they may not help you as much. Curious, though - you said you were seeing a doctor about the pain - did s/he not suggest them?


                Slow-smooth-fast

                  My physio did recommend them but referred me to a expensive chiropodist she knew. I thought I would just try some over the counter ones first. I have just got back from my run, only did 4.5 miles, to try them out. They felt a little strange at first, but then I forgot I had them in, moreover didn't feel any pain. A longer run will put them to the test though.

                  "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009


                  Needs more cowbell!

                    Eddy, what kind did you get? I just got back from our best running store in the area, as I had to exchange a shirt I had bought for a bigger size. While I was there I had a guy help me pick some insoles. Like a dumbass I didn't bring my shoes with. The ones I found fit great without the shoes on, though (just standing on them). Put them in my shoes and they fit perfectly (though they are quite a bit narrower through the toes--hope that doesn't become an issue). They do feel like they have a lot more "structure" to them inside the shoe, though, but I'm planning to just do some shorter, easy runs until I get used to them. They are "10 Seconds™" stability rated performance insoles. I'll let you know how they work for me. k

                    Kirsten - aka "Auntie Kirsten"

                    '14 Goals:

                    • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

                    • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)


                    Slow-smooth-fast

                      they are from the uk in Boots. Let me know how you get on. I have got my hill reps tommorrow. Can hardly wait Confused

                      "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009

                        I'm also on a quest to purchase orthotics..rigid ones per my PT! I tried on a pair of 3/4 length and ran around a little. Just wondering...does anyone use that length? It seems the ridge in front would become annoying if you were running long distances...possibly even irritating your foot? I tried the full length, but it was generic and I'm having a hard time finding the narrow women's version. Maybe once you start using it and "settle into" the orthotic, you don't even notice where it ends on the front of your foot...?


                        Needs more cowbell!

                          I'm having a hard time finding the narrow women's version.
                          Can you trim it through the toes to make it fit your shoes? k

                          Kirsten - aka "Auntie Kirsten"

                          '14 Goals:

                          • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

                          • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)


                          Slow-smooth-fast

                            Can you trim it through the toes to make it fit your shoes? k
                            i dont see why not, after all, they are primarily built up for the midsole so it wont make an difference. I am almost back to full recovery, did ok this month in the virtual races!

                            "I've been following Eddy's improvement over the last two years on this site, and it's been pretty dang solid. Sure the weekly mileage has been up and down, but over the long haul he's getting out the door and has turned himself into quite a runner. He's only now just figuring out his potential. Consistency in running is measured in years, not weeks. And over the last couple of years, Eddy's made great strides" Jeff 14 Jan 2009

                            Mile Collector


                            Abs of Flabs

                              I'm also on a quest to purchase orthotics..rigid ones per my PT! I tried on a pair of 3/4 length and ran around a little. Just wondering...does anyone use that length? It seems the ridge in front would become annoying if you were running long distances...possibly even irritating your foot? I tried the full length, but it was generic and I'm having a hard time finding the narrow women's version. Maybe once you start using it and "settle into" the orthotic, you don't even notice where it ends on the front of your foot...?
                              I had that problem when I had my second pair of 3/4 length orthotics. They were 1/4 of an inch too long and it started irritating the balls of my feet because they were pushing against the rigid orthotic. After a while, the irritation turned into pain. Not too pleasant. I went back to my podiatrist and he sent them back to the factory for refitting. Haven't had any problems after that, and I've ran a whole bunch of marathons in them.
                                Can you trim it through the toes to make it fit your shoes? k
                                Yeah, we trimmed the generic full length rigid one, but it still felt funny. The 3/4 length was nice & comfy, but I was just seeing a problem down the line after constantly banging the front of your foot on the edge of the thing, like Eric had a problem with. Guess it's buy and try! Smile
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