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What are these STRIDERS? (Read 1282 times)

    My novice training program tells me that today I should have done: 1 Mile jog <65%>1 Mile striders; 3x400m @80% w/ 200 m jog recovery; 1 Mile jog <65%>Total 4 Miles but how does the striders equal 1 mile? Is this a typo or am I reading this incorrectly (3x400=1200, + 200m recovery equals 1400!) Someone help me. PS—the <65% means the heart rate, as i'm using a hr monitor means="" the="" heart="" rate,="" as="" i'm="" using="" a="" hr=""></65% means the heart rate, as i'm using a hr monitor>
    Will be weightlifting and running to get into the best shape I can before turning 40. Here are my progress pictures: http://tinyurl.com/584qwt
      As far as I know, "strides" are usually somewhat shorter than that - and generally described as short intervals during which you pick up the pace and work on form. Most of the ones I've seen described call for something like 20-40 seconds of running at a faster but comfortable pace, then slowing to a recovery pace in between. It looks like what your program calls "striders" (?) are actually 400m intervals of some kind. Don't quote me on that, but that's how it reads. Maybe somebody else knows your program. (And I'm not saying a word about the choice of 400m as the interval Tight lipped) As for the mile, since you'll actually be doing TWO 200m recovery jogs ... in between the 3 400m intervals ... I think that's how they get to 1600m/1 mile. I think (I'm guessing) that since this is a novice program, the idea is to get you to run one mile at a slightly faster than usual heart rate. Rather than make you do a whole mile at 80%, they're using the "strider" idea to give you a couple short jog breaks in there. Make sense? Wait. I just noticed that it says total 4 miles - which I guess means the intervals are actually SEPARATE from the "striders?" Now I'm confused. Maybe they mean a mile of strides? Like a mile of short (say 30 second) bursts of speed, and recovery sections ... and THEN traditional 3 x 400m intervals? Pretty complicated for a "novice" program!
      E-mail: JakeKnight2002@aol.com
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        I think I can clarify this. 1 Mile jog <> = 1 mile of slow warmup. 1 Mile striders = 1 mile of warmup with some striders thrown in. Striders (as I know them) are approximately 100m of fast running; as fast as you can safely run while still holding form. Try doing 4-8 striders in the course of this mile, depending on how you feel. These will loosen you up for the intervals to come. 3x400m @80% w/ 200 m jog recovery = Speed interval. (400m x 3) + (200m x 3) = 1800m = 1.1 miles. 1 Mile jog <> = 1 mile of slow cooldown 4.1 miles total, actually.
        How To Run a Marathon: Step 1 - start running. There is no Step 2.
          OK, Firstly thank you for your help. Secondly I would like to point out that I'm an idiot. I used to live in the states so was used to miles, then I moved to Ireland and now getting used to Kilometers. So I totally didn't realize that I was reading 2 measurement systems, so 1000 meters does not equal 1 mile, which is what I was thinking. Also, I think I was misreading the semicolons. In other words, MKLEIMAN is right. Thanks MK. Now the challenge is figuring out what 100 m is when I am not running on a track. I thought it seemed kind of easy. Hopefully next week won't be screwed up by me not doing this week's properly.
          Will be weightlifting and running to get into the best shape I can before turning 40. Here are my progress pictures: http://tinyurl.com/584qwt
            One more point on striders: Don't worry about the striders being exactly 100m -- what you are looking for is a short 20-35 second acceleration while maintaining form. The most important thing is to hold good running form; the speed is secondary. The idea is to help train yourself to hold your form while running fast. Striders are an exercise for developing form, not speed. (Oh, and you're not an idiot. Its just that some of us spend way too much time obsessing over different types of workouts, so the various types of drills are second nature to us.)
            How To Run a Marathon: Step 1 - start running. There is no Step 2.
              Thanks Mathew, I tend to obsess over the details too and sometimes miss the big picture. I like your picture, I hope to run a marathon next year. Maybe the Dublin marathon. First I have to get over the beginner 12-week program and then I may try to find a good Marathon training program. Recommend any books sources?
              Will be weightlifting and running to get into the best shape I can before turning 40. Here are my progress pictures: http://tinyurl.com/584qwt
                I just finished my first marathon using the Pfitzinger 18/55 program from Advanced Marathoning. Its an excellent program -- very highly regarded among marathon runners. Admittedly, however, its not designed for first-time marathoners. Its doable, but quite challenging. The authors recommend that you be able to run 25 miles a week comfortably before embarking on the plan. The first week starts at 30+ miles. If that sounds too ambitious, I've also heard good things about Hal Higdon's marathon training plans. You might look at both his beginner and his intermediate plans, and pick the one that looks like the best fit.
                How To Run a Marathon: Step 1 - start running. There is no Step 2.
                vicentefrijole


                  I just finished my first marathon using the Pfitzinger 18/55 program from Advanced Marathoning.... I've also heard good things about Hal Higdon's marathon training plans.
                  I completely agree with the above statements. I used Higdon's plan for my first and second marathons (it's a very popular plan for 1st-timers) and used the Pfitzinger Advanced Marathoning book for my third/most-recent one. I would recommend the Higdon book for your 1st marathon. As MK said, Pfitzingers plan is challenging, also a bit more complex than the Higdon plan. The Higdon plan will give you a good understanding of some of the basic philosophy of marathon training and then you can always go for the Pfitzinger plan on your NEXT marathon! (I'm assuming you'll be completely addicted.) Anyways, that's what worked for me. I'm sure you'll be fine either way. By the way, I'd suggest buying these books (or checking them out at a library, borrowing from a friend?) as there is some good advice/details inside, aside from the training plans. You can find them pretty cheap online (especially if you buy used books), I bet.