Low HR Training

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low HR training and wieght loss (Read 385 times)

    Is it reasonable to expect to lose some weight while doing low HR training? I'd like to lose about 20-25 pounds. I know it's not realistic to expect that to happen in just 4 months but some change would be nice. Yes
    Finished my first marathon 1-13-2008 in 6:03:37 at P.F. Chang's in Phoenix. PR in San Antonio RnR 5:45:58!!!!!! on 11-16-08 The only thing that has ever made any difference in my running is running. Goal: Break 2:30 in the HM this year Jay Benson Tri (place in Athena category) 5-10-09
      Is it reasonable to expect to lose some weight while doing low HR training?
      Yes, but... remember that it's the nutrition/diet thing that's going to do the job for weight loss. The way LHR training, in particular (compared to other training), will help with this is that it will help train your fat metabolism to do more and work more efficiently - and this can help control (and modify) your appetite. A couple pointers from personal experience: 1) if possible, avoid eating for at least a few hours before training. I'm one of those who eats dinner the night before and runs in the morning before breakfast. The main thing to avoid is eating much in the way of carbohydrates too close to the run. You want to train the fat metabolism, and loading up on carbs before training defeats the purpose. 2) Try to go at least 40 minutes or so. This depends on the individual to some extent, but many find that between 30 and 45 minutes are needed to fully "switch over" so that the body will continue metabolizing fat and the appetite will be under control for hours. I know one woman who's always hungry when she wakes up, but after about 45 minutes on the road, "bingo"... the hunger disappears. I'm not hungry when I get up, but I found that if I am out for at least 35-40 minutes I don't want to eat much at breakfast (and maybe lunch.) When I was starting out I didn't lose weight like the numbers suggested, but after I switched to running before breakfast, I lost 10 lbs in 2 months. The thing to avoid is running too hard or too fast. That burns calories, but it doesn't train the body's fat metabolism for endurance exercise, and it can leave the body starved for carbs so that you want to eat more. I find it much more convenient to run easy, build endurance, and control the appetite. Gino
        Thanks. I realize that weight loss is going to have a lot to do with diet I was just wondering if LHR training would help. They always say to try not to lose weight during marathon training so that is why I was asking.
        Finished my first marathon 1-13-2008 in 6:03:37 at P.F. Chang's in Phoenix. PR in San Antonio RnR 5:45:58!!!!!! on 11-16-08 The only thing that has ever made any difference in my running is running. Goal: Break 2:30 in the HM this year Jay Benson Tri (place in Athena category) 5-10-09


        run-easy-race-hard

          I think, in short, if you run more miles using low HR training than you do using any other type of training without taking in more calories, then you will lose more weight than by other approaches!
            I've been running for several years now, and before I tried LHR, I would always get ridiculously hungry after long runs. So hungry I couldn't ignore it, and so I would always end up gaining weight around any marathon training. Since low HR training, I do not feel that hunger after long runs. So it has made a huge difference in the weight loss for me. I didn't have much I was trying to lose, just 10-15 lbs, but both the lack of that crazy hunger after long runs, and the ability to increase my mileage beyond what I did before have helped enormously.
              ... Since low HR training, I do not feel that hunger after long runs.
              Same here. I had someone explain it once in terms of the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems... a physiologist/physician would probably understand the details. All I know is that the longer my run, the longer it took me to feel hungry afterward. When I ran hard (shorter distances), I would be hungrier later and eat more, even though the total caloric expenditure was less in the run.