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Is walking allowed? (Read 1083 times)

    Okay, well I don't know much about racing. I've seen people stop to walk but I always thought they were quitting...so my question is this...Can I stop and walk some in a HM? How much of the race can a walk? Like run 6 miles, walk 1/2 mile run 2 more, walk again a bit, etc? Does it still count as running a HM? Have you ever done so? I'm afraid I won't feel like I really did the race if I walk at all. But in WV in January...I afraid if I don't walk some I might die Wink
    Goals: Maintain 120 beat 5k time: 25:52 beat 10k time: 55:48 Complete one half-marathon-Jan. 10th
      My opinion is that the goal of racing is to get from point A to point B as fast as possible. Sometimes, including walk-breaks in your running is the fastest way to do that, because it lets you sustain a higher effort level for those running segments. Plus, if you're doing hills, it doesn't wear you out as much... again, leaving more energy for those running segments. Even more experienced HM runners will often walk through all of the aid stations to make sure that the liquids end up in the proper places... Wink FWIW, my fastest 5K times so far have been when I ran hard, walked until I was a little recovered, and then ran hard again. I can run forever at a super-slow level, but if I want to go faster I've got to walk... YMMV (your milage may vary), of course. Big grin

      Roads were made for journeys...


      Finished!

        Walking is definitely used as a strategy and is one I think I will plan on employing on my first longer distance race. there are even programs that focus on training you in a run-walk interval system for racing Smile I'm sure JK will pop in and make some comments. Some good reading on walk breaks can be found here: http://www.jeffgalloway.com/training/walk_breaks.html
        Walk + Jog = wog.
        I'm trying to Lose 5% at a time
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          Okay, well I don't know much about racing. I've seen people stop to walk but I always thought they were quitting...so my question is this...Can I stop and walk some in a HM? How much of the race can a walk? Like run 6 miles, walk 1/2 mile run 2 more, walk again a bit, etc? Does it still count as running a HM? Have you ever done so? I'm afraid I won't feel like I really did the race if I walk at all. But in WV in January...I afraid if I don't walk some I might die Wink
          Chloe: As I've repeatedly mentioned elsewhere, I'm an unconditional fan of Galloway's run/walk methods, especially for beginners. (Although I actually think almost any level of runner could benefit from at least considering inserting walk breaks in distances past maybe 10k or 10 mile distance). Walking is not only allowed at longer distances - for beginners, it ought to be encouraged. For the record, I take walk breaks in almost every single training run I do, and it's the single thing I credit for my improvement, for staying injury free, and keeping me happy. Galloway's basic book is probably at your library, but here's a link to his discussion of walk breaks in marathons: http://jeffgalloway.com/training/walk_breaks.html And here's his half-marathon beginner plan: http://www.jeffgalloway.com/training/half_marathon.html Don't ever let anyone tell you walking is a bad idea. Trust me on one thing - if you do it right, you'll be passing some of those same people later in the race. And laughing while you do. One word of advice: if you decide to use walk breaks, take shorter breaks more often. I wouldn't wait six miles and walk half a mile; instead, I'd take a short (maybe 45-60 seconds) break at every mile marker. That link above probably explains why. For what it's worth, during my recent 10 minute PR at the Monkey-thon, I'd guess I walked no less than 20 times. In fact, I suspect I could have finished faster, if I had walked SOONER; had I stuck to my plan and taken smart walk breaks (instead of getting caught up in interesting conversation for the first 12 miles), I would have finished much stronger. And as I've also mentioned elsewhere, that isn't the only one of my current PR's that had some walking in it. During my first marathon, I was convinced I had to run every single step. So I did. It was 20 minutes slower, and a miserable experience. Horrible. I didn't run again for years. I couldn't walk for a week after. It was truly stupid. Only two things matter - did you finish? And how fast? The rest is details. And trust me on that bit about passing some of the runners later on who thought you were wimping out. It will happen. Try not to laugh.
          I'm sure JK will pop in and make some comments. Some good reading on walk breaks can be found here: http://www.jeffgalloway.com/training/walk_breaks.html
          Wink ... Good call! A last note: you may not always want to walk. Someday, at some distances, you might decide it's better not to. I think at this point in my training, I probably wouldn't in a half marathon, just because I think I could do it faster without. Or maybe I would. I probably always will in marathons, especially if I plan on doing another one soon after. You recover faster. You feel better. But I'll never feel bad for walking, if it gets me to the finish line faster, at any distance. It's a race, after all.
          E-mail: JakeKnight2002@aol.com
          -----------------------------

            Walking is totally cool, and don't let any high-and-mighty racing purist tell you otherwise. Lots of people walk in longer races, whether at water stations, as part of a Galloway-type strategy, or simply due to fatigue. I'm no speedster, but I tend to finish in the top 10-20% of the field in my races (HMs and Marathon) and I see lots of quite talented runners walking at some point. Also, don't worry whether you can call it "running" the HM. Did you go as fast as you could reasonably go on that day? Then you "raced" the HM, which is far more important than "running" it, or "walking" it, or "sashaying" it, etc. However, if you do walk, please be very cautious and considerate of others in the race. Before you slow to walk, check behind you and move to one side of the course (preferably the right side, at least in America). Never walk in the middle of the course. Even at the water tables, where many people walk, be aware of runners around you moving at different paces. (Indeed, if you're going to walk through the water stations, consider walking behind the tables so that those trying to drink-and-run can keep on moving.)
            How To Run a Marathon: Step 1 - start running. There is no Step 2.


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              When I did my first (and only, thus far) HM there was a lady who I kept seeing...she would walk/run/walk/run. I think she must have been doing the full marathon, as I didn't see her after the branch-off point. I'm starting to think that for longer runs and races I might benefit from walking, too. I was a sprinter in HS and often wonder if I would go faster for the same distance if I were to run faster stretches, then walk a bit in-between. It's definitely something I think about experimenting with. My biggest problem is that once I stop to walk I have a hard time getting myself to run, again... k

              Kirsten - aka "Auntie Kirsten"

              '14 Goals:

              • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

              • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)


              You'll ruin your knees!

                You might have heard about my little run a few weeks back (timed event...how far you can go within a time threshold). I watched a woman WALK every step of the 24 hour event and she covered OVER 100 miles. At the awards ceremony, she was named a "centurion" for being one of a very elite group of people who have ever accomplished this feat! (or should I say feet!). Methinks walking's OK! Lynn B

                ""...the truth that someday, you will go for your last run. But not today—today you got to run." - Matt Crownover (after Western States)

                  However, if you do walk, please be very cautious and considerate of others in the race. Before you slow to walk, check behind you and move to one side of the course (preferably the right side, at least in America). Never walk in the middle of the course. Even at the water tables, where many people walk, be aware of runners around you moving at different paces. (Indeed, if you're going to walk through the water stations, consider walking behind the tables so that those trying to drink-and-run can keep on moving.)
                  Good call. Despite the fact that I usually take some walk breaks myself, other walkers invariably bug the crap out of me when they're inconsiderate. Pull over to the right, and pay attention. As for the water stations, I always jog through to close to the end, then grab a cup and head to the right to walk. All the runners who grab the first cup in line and then stand there three across should be covered in monkey food and set free in the forest ...
                  It's definitely something I think about experimenting with. My biggest problem is that once I stop to walk I have a hard time getting myself to run, again...
                  No question - that is the one hard part, at least at first. The great benefit of setting one steady pace is that you get in a groove; that's why I wouldn't consider walking at anything 10k or less, although it might be great idea for some people. But after getting used to the walk breaks, I found that I'm actually really eager to start running again. At marathon distance, the running starts to feel more natural than the walking.
                  I watched a woman WALK every step of the 24 hour event and she covered OVER 100 miles.
                  That's actually more impressive than running it. I can't even imagine being able to keep up a 4+ mile per hour pace walking for 100 miles. I'm not sure I could do it for 5 miles. Then again, I'd rather run a marathon then spend a couple hours walking around the mall ... I hate the dreaded "Mall Feet" syndrome.
                  E-mail: JakeKnight2002@aol.com
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                  bas


                    Last half marathon I raced was the first time I took walking breaks, mostly at water stations but also going up a steep bridge. I ran a PR and felt much better than in the half marathons I did earlier. I did this as an experiment after reading another thread where JK mentioned to Galloway's articles and schedules. So thanks for that! Smile bas

                    52° 21' North, 4° 52' East


                    Now that was a bath...

                      I'm so glad this thread came up because I tried walk breaks twice recently and they didn't sit right with me at all. Firstly, like Zoomy I find that I don't want to start running again once I start walking and then - when I do start running again I am more likely to walk again after the intitial walk break. Jake - it was helpful you pointing out about not taking them on distances under 10km. I am just now about to push the 10km boundary so we will see how I feel doing slightly longer distances. Take today - my only break was when I got caught in traffic crossing the road about 1km from home in a 6km run. I only paused for about five seconds but it felt 'weird' running again after the pause. At this point I imagine I will definitely have to take walk breaks to cover anything over a half marathon distance in the next few years and quite possibly for the rest of my running years - so it's great to hear that they won't necessarily affect my times - and may even improve them! Claire xxx
                    • jlynnbob "HTFU, Kookie's distal tibia"
                    • Where's my closet? I need to get back in it.
                        Last half marathon I raced was the first time I took walking breaks, mostly at water stations but also going up a steep bridge. I ran a PR and felt much better than in the half marathons I did earlier.
                        Congrats on the PR!
                        Jake - it was helpful you pointing out about not taking them on distances under 10km.
                        Keep in mind though that I was only talking about myself. I definitely wasn't telling you when to take (or not take) walk breaks. At this point, for ME, I don' t think there's much point in me taking walk breaks at that distance. (Although Galloway would likely disagree with me, and I'm open to experimenting a bit to see what works best in terms of speed). But YOU will have to do your own experiments. I can't really compare myself to you - since you're a freak of nature and all - but when I was just a month back into running, I was walking almost as much as I was running, even at 3-4 mile distance. I doubt I was even capable of running a 10k without walking when I was where you are.
                        E-mail: JakeKnight2002@aol.com
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                          Thanks for the advice guys. My plan is to run about 8 miles of it. Then walk a bit, then finish up. I just wanted to make sure people wouldn't laugh at me if I walked some. You have to keep in mind that running in WV isn't as popular at other places. Last year's HM had 80 people it it...It will be obvious to everyone if I'm the biggest/slowest/walkyest loser out there. I can run the distance without stopping, but I wanted to have a concrete back-up plan if I start to die out there, or die of embarrassment. I USUALLY but not always run on a treadmill so outside in the cold will be a rude awakening. Also it takes place on a gravel trail road along the river, so I probably pass out from the intense cold, fall into the river and have to swim the rest of the race. Then I will blame you guys for helping to feed my running addiction---I can't even go two hours without checking this site. Now hopefully I don't wuss out!!! Thanks experts! alyssa
                          Goals: Maintain 120 beat 5k time: 25:52 beat 10k time: 55:48 Complete one half-marathon-Jan. 10th
                          mbk


                            Some people walk the whole race! Wink
                            bas


                              I just wanted to make sure people wouldn't laugh at me if I walked some.
                              I don't know anything about WV, but I do remember that I was afraid that people would laugh at me when I first started running. They didn't, or at least not so I noticed. Then I was afraid they would laugh at me for being too slow. Still no reaction. Then I was afraid that people would laugh at me for walking during runs. Nope. The harsh truth is that they don't care one way or the other. Running, walking, standing on my head, it doesn't seem to make any difference to them. So now I am left with one question: What's on these people's minds if it isn't me? Wink You'll be allright! bas

                              52° 21' North, 4° 52' East

                                Some people walk the whole race! Wink
                                And most of those go faster than me, running, LOL! One of my 5K goals still remains to finish ahead of all racewalkers. A goal I've not met yet in my vast 15 month running career! Big grin Someday, someday... But you know, by and large, experienced runners don't laugh at slow-pokes, and they definitely don't laugh at people taking walk breaks. And anyone who does... isn't worth your time. Period. Walk when you need to, run when you can. Move the fastest way you can from point A to point B and let any would-be laughers eat your dust!!!

                                Roads were made for journeys...

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