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Do you think running is painful? (Read 1059 times)

    I agree with Amores - if you feel the feeling that you get when you should not be running, then that means you should not be running.  Otherwise keep running.. unless you have to stop to hork or something.

    So if we simply define the feeling you get when you're running and it hurts as being labeled one of two different labels, subject to the following rules:

     - pain if you shouldn't be running

     - just discomfort if you should be running

     

    I'm pretty confident that we can conclude that you will only feel the feeling we define by "pain" if you shouldn't be running.

     

     

    Circular reasoning to the rescue!


    A Saucy Wench

      Well...no right now I have pain when I run pretty much all the time.  But I already have proven that not running a) does not reduce the pain and b) actually makes the pain worse.   As far as I can tell my best solution is to always run easy and eventually that will give me the LEAST amount of pain.  But not yet, right now it is all pain. 

       

      But I've already eliminated not running as an option.

      I have become Death, the destroyer of electronic gadgets

       

      "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - dd, age 7

      Buelligan


        There's pain you can push through and pain you shouldn't. Never ever run through a sharp pain in your joints, but go ahead and revel in the misery of skating on the edge of an anaerobic meltdown every now and then.

         

         If l didn't want it to, none of my runs would hurt... but l don't want that.


        Pass the coffee.

          Along the lines of Buelligan... there are different types of pain.  There's "hurt" pain, "working on developing an injury" pain, and "pushing your limits" pain.

           

          Generally, on a long run, no, running is not painful.  Gut check at mile marker 3 of a 5k will tell me yes, running is painful.

          Better I Leave


            There's pain you can push through and pain you shouldn't. Never ever run through a sharp pain in your joints, but go ahead and revel in the misery of skating on the edge of an anaerobic meltdown every now and then.

             Indeed. I'm primarily a lifter and can appreciate the "pain" from a good workout but sharp pain? Nuh uh...I'm savvy to that and that's precisely why I backed off of yesterday's run. Knowing one's body is key I suppose and as much as I tried, my "gut" told me that it wasn't wise to do any more than what I did. Feeling a bit sore from a good. overzealous workout is one thing...injuring oneself to prove a point or ignore one's body is another.


            not lazy, just tired

              There's pain you can push through and pain you shouldn't. Never ever run through a sharp pain in your joints, but go ahead and revel in the misery of skating on the edge of an anaerobic meltdown every now and then.

               

               If l didn't want it to, none of my runs would hurt... but l don't want that.

               

              I guess in my mind, I identify the pain you can push through as discomfort (at times extreme discomfort), and the kind you can't (shouldn't) push through as pain.

               

              So, yeah, semantics. I agree with rgilbert who agrees with TonyP who agrees with Jeff who agrees with Mikeymike.

              Not if it makes sense.

                OK, so Buelligan has brought the word "misery" into the discussion - I will admit to experiencing misery, and also discomfort, while running in hard races. But I don't personally consider plain ordinary misery or discomfort to be "pain". 

                 

                However, I would like to refine my previous post a bit, where I said I don't feel pain while running. I've never run a marathon. I did run 22 miles once, with the first 20 miles at full speed, just to see how fast I could do it. At some point a few steps past mile 20, I :

                        A) could no longer physically run, and had to stagger the next two miles like a drunken sailor; 

                        B) I felt pain. A lot of it, in my upper legs and feet.

                 

                Also, when I do extra long, fast (for me) training runs, which I enjoy doing from time to time, even though I don't feel what I would describe as pain WHILE I'm running (endorphins?), I do feel excruciating pain, mainly in my upper legs after these runs, and sometimes it hurts like hell. After a particularly good long run like this I also develop what I like to call the "runner's flu", with body aches and pains and generally feeling miserable for the rest of the day and into the night. So, I do indeed experience pain cause by running; I just don' t feel it while I'm running or racing under ordinary (for me) circumstances.

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