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Any overweighters that became long distance runners? (Read 102 times)

    Walking on off days/everyday is amazing IMO.

     

    I'm not sure I'd want to be sprinting....yet....perhaps like 3 strides once a twice a week at this point....

     

    I'd say from 20-35yo I was all about getting in shape NOW! vs.... taking my time and doing things right.

     

    from about 35-42(now) I've been trying to get it back, back in shape etc... I'm in far better shape than I was but not the 20yo athlete I was... and not that i will but it takes time I find,

    so my advice now would be take your time....don't worry as much about immediate results... just keep at it, keep going, your program will fix itself over time... stay healthy and keep improving.

    stuff takes time,

    300m- 37 sec.

    StevenAU


      Yeah my friend that’s what I’m thinking, just stick with it as it’s only been a short time. That’s humans always wanting more results quicker haha. The good thing is I’m building a good aerobic base, and I’ll just work upon 10% more each week, i think I mite be able to do double sessions. I don’t go to hard either

       

      Walking on off days/everyday is amazing IMO.

       

      I'm not sure I'd want to be sprinting....yet....perhaps like 3 strides once a twice a week at this point....

       

      I'd say from 20-35yo I was all about getting in shape NOW! vs.... taking my time and doing things right.

       

      from about 35-42(now) I've been trying to get it back, back in shape etc... I'm in far better shape than I was but not the 20yo athlete I was... and not that i will but it takes time I find,

      so my advice now would be take your time....don't worry as much about immediate results... just keep at it, keep going, your program will fix itself over time... stay healthy and keep improving.

      stuff takes time,

      zebano


        I was 240 lbs (5'10") a few years before I began running. It wasn't a fun place to be and I'm glad I changed my habits. Honestly most of my weight loss was directly due to cutting out pop from my diet. That took me to 190lbs which is where I began my running journey. At my fastest I was 155lbs but I'm pretty happy at 170 these  days though I keep thinking about trying to lose 5-10lbs and regain that ease of running I had back in 2018.

        1600 - 5:23 (2018), 5k - 19:33 (2018), 10k - 41:20 (2021), half - 1:38:57 (2018), Marathon - 3:37:17 (2018)

        jsfuller


          The good thing is I’m building a good aerobic base, and I’ll just work upon 10% more each week, i think I mite be able to do double sessions. I don’t go to hard either

           

          Patience. Remember, 10% is the maximum. I recommend aiming for 5%. You can do this by bumping 10% every OTHER week. Running is fun. Running yourself into injury is not.

           

          In the Jack Daniels Running Formula book (the only book I've read on running), he recommended running the same mileage for a month before increasing.

           

          I think of the 10% increase as more of a "normal" rate for getting back to a mileage that one used to be at in the medium history ago (e.g. 6-12 months ago), but this last sentence is totally my opinion based on my subjective gut feel. I ramp up slower than that if I'm going to a new weekly mileage or one that I have not been at in longer than a year ago.

           

          Two things you will love:

          + running with less weight

          + running in cooler temps.

           

          I find 20 - 30 (winter) and 40 - 60 deg F to be my favorite temps. I live in MN. When it is between 30 & 40, there's too many cold puddles. Smile

          (and it is January when I write this)

          StevenAU


            Yeah the thing is it wasn’t a big Injury just aching I let my self rest for three days and it’s almost gone away. I won’t do anything like that again haha

             

             

            Patience. Remember, 10% is the maximum. I recommend aiming for 5%. You can do this by bumping 10% every OTHER week. Running is fun. Running yourself into injury is not.

             

            In the Jack Daniels Running Formula book (the only book I've read on running), he recommended running the same mileage for a month before increasing.

             

            I think of the 10% increase as more of a "normal" rate for getting back to a mileage that one used to be at in the medium history ago (e.g. 6-12 months ago), but this last sentence is totally my opinion based on my subjective gut feel. I ramp up slower than that if I'm going to a new weekly mileage or one that I have not been at in longer than a year ago.

             

            Two things you will love:

            + running with less weight

            + running in cooler temps.

             

            I find 20 - 30 (winter) and 40 - 60 deg F to be my favorite temps. I live in MN. When it is between 30 & 40, there's too many cold puddles. Smile

            (and it is January when I write this)

            berylrunner


            Rick

              I guess I qualify.  High weight 226 in 2010.  Started running and cleaned up my diet.  Ran a marathon 2 years later 50 pounds lighter.  It was really hard to maintain that weight.  Eventually my body settled around 190.  Had plenty of injuries.  Just wanted to keep pushing the running goals.  Completed dozens of marathon to 100 mile distances.  Weight has gone over 200 and need to get it in check.  Ran my best marathon a couple of days ago.  Feeling wise, not time wise.

              My advice.  Focus on diet.  Use exercise as a supplement.  Activity every day, even if it means walking.  When running, just run.  Don't worry about pace and all the numbers.  Patience is they key.  You will have setbacks and you will get through them.  Good luck.

              12-22  Last One Standing  - dnf 37 miles

              1-23 Sun Marathon - 3:53

              4-23 Zion 100

               

               

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