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sprinting and long distance or the fast/slow twitch business (Read 2742 times)


sincerely silly

    Is it possible to train for longer runs while keeping my sprinting speed?  I don't expect to ever want to run more than 8 miles a day (far, far in the future =P) so that is the "long distance" in mind.  I ask because though I wanted to train for a 10k, most of the sports I participate in require what I understand to be fast twitch muscle.  Sparring, sprinting in softball/soccer and the like. 

     

    I'm just doing these things recreationally and right now my goal is the 10k later this year so I'm willing to refocus if I have to.  But it'd be nice if I could know if it's possible to train both types of muscles and not lose a noticeable amount of speed (given that I don't start running marathons).  I'd still be doing the normal weights and workouts I used to do, I hope.

     

    It's just that it's all I have to offer in most sports since I lack most of the actual coordination part! :-)  I'd hate to lose my nickname of "wheels".  =P I used to sprint and jump in high school so I guess it's always been more of my thing... 

     

    Sorry if this is a dumb question but I tried doing some searching online but I'm getting a lot of non specific answers (e.g. "uh maybe if you run 10 miles or something like that") and I'm still not sure...(I tried searching the forums too but I hadn't found exactly what I was looking thus far!)

     

    Thanks in advance!

    shin splints are my nemesis


    Fat butt on couch

      You may reduce your chances of winning Olympic gold in the 100m from 0.00001% to 0.000001%, but yes.

       

      First, decide your priorities.  Honestly you can obviously run and even compete in 10Ks without running more than 8 miles/day but if that is your longest run you will still be limiting yourself....but that is your decision based on priorities.

       

      The key is to keep doing drills and sprints on a regular basis.  If you keep touch with the speed, you will not lose the speed.  Continuing to participate in these more explosive sports will also help.

       

      I have absolutely no speed, but I was surprised once when I really focused on it for only 3 weeks how much progress I was able to make.  Speed comes and goes quickly, unlike aerobic capacity and endurance which both build and erode much more slowly.

      "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

       


      sincerely silly

        You may reduce your chances of winning Olympic gold in the 100m from 0.00001% to 0.000001%, but yes.

         

        First, decide your priorities.  Honestly you can obviously run and even compete in 10Ks without running more than 8 miles/day but if that is your longest run you will still be limiting yourself....but that is your decision based on priorities.

         

        The key is to keep doing drills and sprints on a regular basis.  If you keep touch with the speed, you will not lose the speed.  Continuing to participate in these more explosive sports will also help.

         

        I have absolutely no speed, but I was surprised once when I really focused on it for only 3 weeks how much progress I was able to make.  Speed comes and goes quickly, unlike aerobic capacity and endurance which both build and erode much more slowly.

         

        Haha, okay.  I guess that's all I really needed to know.  If I have a sparring tournament coming up  or something I'll just re-distribute the workouts.  Thanks! 

         

        I always have had trouble prioritizing...

        shin splints are my nemesis

          I agree with the previous answer- it depends on what you want from running the 10k.

          If you want to run well and get anywhere near your potential you will need to build up your aerobic fitness over a period of several months by doing longer runs at a slower pace. Typically people seem to do 30-50 miles per week, for several months, with long runs in the range of 10-15 miles.

          Obviously you can get by with less, and if you really want to run well you do more.

          PBs since age 60:  5k- 24:36, 10k - 47:17. Half Marathon- 1:42:41.

                                              10 miles (unofficial) 1:16:44.

           

            Solid aerobic work will help with soccer, basketball, tennis etc. The more aerobic speed you have, the more endurance you will have in any of those sports, as well as a 10k.

             

            --Jimmy

              Solid aerobic work will help with soccer, basketball, tennis etc. The more aerobic speed you have, the more endurance you will have in any of those sports, as well as a 10k.

               

              --Jimmy

               

              I agree, and yet I cringe when I hear some soccer coaches tell their kids to not run XC because it will hurt their soccer. 

              A properly trained XC runner will have their speed and endurance developed.  From what I see with the schools around here, the XC runners get a great deal of fast running.  kids, especially the younger ones, might not do so well with an 800m interval, but ask them to not spring during a 100m stride, and you can be assured they'll turn it into a sprint race. 

               

              I remember after I started running XC my Jr year of HS my raw speed greatly improved. Prior  to that  I sat the bench in football. I still wasn't halfback/receiver fast, but I was no longer slower than all the lineman on the football team. 

                I have absolutely no speed...

                 

                I read that...then I looked at you signature line and about puked Smile


                sincerely silly

                  It's crazy that coaches would tell people NOT to do XC...the hills are great for helping with speed, I found! (In HS I did XC in the fall, and jumped and sprinted in winter, and tennis in spring)  Plus the high school level xc distances top at 5k. :-)  Okay, well, I just wanted to make sure nothing drastic would happen that was secretly common knowledge. I remember that my flexibility went down after I started more strength training a few years ago but I eventually got that back too.  Clearly it's possible to have both, but it was a noticeable difference at first.  (Unless that's a myth...it might've been something else then?)

                   

                  Balance!

                  shin splints are my nemesis

                    ´╗┐Hate to disagree, but HS soccer players shouldnt do XC. The main reason is the soccer club season runs nearly year round. That includes tourn. in the Fall. It would be very difficult for a student to play competitive soccer, run XC and attend class. The soccer player would gain more from playing competitive soccer through the fall rather than running XC.

                     

                    I do agree that not enough time is spent by soccer players on being fit to run 90 min. The test of 2 miles in 12 min. should be easy, but often times it is not. There could be time on weekends, or other non-practice days, for long easy runs. Every coach would be thrilled not having to spend time getting the team in shape.

                    Dont call it a comeback

                      ´╗┐Hate to disagree, but HS soccer players shouldnt do XC. The main reason is the soccer club season runs nearly year round. That includes tourn. in the Fall. It would be very difficult for a student to play competitive soccer, run XC and attend class. The soccer player would gain more from playing competitive soccer through the fall rather than running XC.

                       

                       

                       

                      I'd imagine that if a kid was good enough to play travel soccer in HS he's getting a lot of running already.