1234

Linux Users: Chime In... (Read 163 times)


Prince of Fatness

    And what happens to you when that one LDAP guru you managed to find gets hit by a bus or finds a better job?  If my job and reputation depend on it, I going to design something I know will work, that I can get support on, and that follows general industry best practices.

     

    Yep.  As I said before it really depends on the business requirements.  If you can afford to be down for an extended period of time (rare by there are cases) then sure, use a cheap solution.  But yeah, support is what scares people away from Linux.

     

    You want a real fun job?  Provide desktop support for developers.  I did that for a couple of years.  Their machines were not locked down and they thought that the corporate network was their sandbox.  Good times, I'll tell you.

    Semi-retired.


    Not dead. Yet.

       Yep.  As I said before it really depends on the business requirements.  If you can afford to be down for an extended period of time (rare by there are cases) then sure, use a cheap solution.  But yeah, support is what scares people away from Linux.

       

      In this case you're right (OpenLDAP), but in many of the larger opensource projects make their money from support.  So instead of paying for a product and then also paying a yearly service contract, you can get the product for free and then pay only for support. Not free if you use them that way, but less expensive to say the least.

       

      The technologies are no joke and are used in lots of high-profile applications.  I know for a fact that JPL uses MySQL to store terrabytes of info gathered from moon missions.

      How can we know our limits if we don't test them?

        Still though, linux opensource apps are not toys and I think you are just working your own ego to suggest so.  Mysql, python, redis, apache, firefox to name a few.  I have made some very complex databases, and I still don't think I have yet to hit the need for an Oracle install.  MySQL is 100% free and will cover the job in 95% of cases.  If I was making the decision to go with a half a million dollar product, I would make sure to benchmark the application against all of the "toy" databases as well.  I hope you have some metrics to support your decision over the free one.

         

        I never suggested they were toys and I really don't have as much of an ego as some people in this business.  MySQL is great, but corporate IT departments usually standarize on MS SQL and Oracle for support and performance reasons.  Again, they want to have a company they can call and give hell to if things are falling apart.  They also want to limit the number of different platforms they have to support to reduce the cost of training support personnel or hiring additional DBAs.  I did not choose the product, it was chosen as part of a RFP process that I didn't have much input into.  I am not really an application guy or even a DBA, I design and install network infrastructure. I will install and harden the OS and the vendor will install the application.  MySQL is not an option.  The vendor uses Oracle on the backend due to the extremely high transaction rate and that is the only database they support.

         

        I didn't mean to offend anyone with the birkenstock comment.  I know it is stereotypical, but I worked with a Linux guy that was just like that.  He showed up two to three hours late everyday in birkenstocks and a ponytail, but he would work until late in the night.


        Prince of Fatness

          The technologies are no joke and are used in lots of high-profile applications.  I knodispw for a fact that JPL uses MySQL to store terrabytes of info gathered from moon missions.

           

          Yeah I am not disputing that.  I was the free part of it that I took issue with.  When you are running a business nothing is free, really.

          Semi-retired.

          zonykel


            I used Ubuntu for a short time, but couldn't get used to it. Someone went out of his way to make almost everything backwards compared to windows. Who needs the confusion.

             

            i hacked my TiVo a while back and had to refresh my memory and look up many of the unix commands. But it wasnt a very pleasant experience, especially when you think you've bricked your machine (thankfully, I was able to recover).

             

            thats the extent of my Linux experience.


            Interval Junkie --Nobby

               Yep.  As I said before it really depends on the business requirements.  If you can afford to be down for an extended period of time (rare by there are cases) then sure, use a cheap solution.  But yeah, support is what scares people away from Linux. 

               

              I'm only a little surprised to hear the above mentality.  Sure was prevalent until about 4 years ago, but my clients tend to want "free" solutions instead of a service license.  In fact, Oracle is shot down immediately from any proposal for cost reasons.  It's actually bewildering when a good non-free product is shown as clearly best-of-breed and gets dismissed because of a $5k yearly license (a pittance).  Anyway, complete reversal from the above -- which had been my experience for the last 15 years . . . struggling to get stuff like Apache accepted.

               

              Truthfully, it depends on your IT staff.  We roll our eyes at "support tickets".  And our DARs now weigh heavily in favor of active online community support (meaning, I can google my way out of any problem), rather than for-pay support: turn around is just way too long, and 1-2nd tier support is a joke.  But it depends on your IT shop.  As mentioned above, we do production support/dev, not corporate support.

               

              I don't envy having to support devs with root.  I tell my guys: you want to run linux on your desktop?  No problem: but if you screw something up or have a problem, fix it on your weekend.

              2014 Goals:  sub-3 Marathon ("Congrats! It's tough to race with poop in the mind" --Wing)

              Current Status 03/17: Drinking beer and eating crap -- all the things I couldn't do before the marathon

              MrH


                The process is the goal.

                Men heap together the mistakes of their lives, and create a monster they call Destiny.

                  Out of the 400 or so Virtual Servers I administer, think we have about 10 Centos \ RedHat servers excluding the VMWare Hosts themselves. I do need to learn more Linux, but there's only so many hrs in a day.


                  Not dead. Yet.

                     

                    LOL.  So true.  Is that xkcd?  Python got it's own as an easter egg.  Try opening a shell and typing:

                    python
                    import antigravity

                    How can we know our limits if we don't test them?


                    HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer

                       

                      LOL.  So true.  Is that xkcd?  Python got it's own as an easter egg.  Try opening a shell and typing:

                      python
                      import antigravity

                       

                      Ok, that was funny.

                      It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.

                         

                        LOL.  So true.  Is that xkcd?  Python got it's own as an easter egg.  Try opening a shell and typing:

                        python
                        import antigravity

                         

                        Ha, maybe I'll head all my scripts with that.

                        Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

                          Mandrake, Mandriva, Red Hat, SUSE, Fedora, Ubuntu, openSUSE

                           

                          JaPH

                           

                          I have used ubuntu and fedora but I prefer Ubuntu.

                          we should prioritize our health and body. my site


                          Interval Junkie --Nobby

                            Comcast decided to stop listing to SMTP on port 25.  Instead, you need to hit 465 or 587 with a TLS handshake or SSL.  Took me about 4hrs to figure out how to do this in Postfix with SASL.

                             

                            Like I said, a hobby.

                            2014 Goals:  sub-3 Marathon ("Congrats! It's tough to race with poop in the mind" --Wing)

                            Current Status 03/17: Drinking beer and eating crap -- all the things I couldn't do before the marathon


                            Not dead. Yet.

                              Comcast decided to stop listing to SMTP on port 25.  Instead, you need to hit 465 or 587 with a TLS handshake or SSL.  Took me about 4hrs to figure out how to do this in Postfix with SASL.

                               

                              nmap is your friend for that one.  Wireshark would probably help too, but I have never spent the time to learn it properly.  Someday...

                              How can we know our limits if we don't test them?

                              1234