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Stress Fracture, do I have to see a doctor? (Read 109 times)

sugargliderslave


    I believe I have a stress fracture in my shin. I went from a very sedentary lifestyle to running five or six days a week. I ignored the pain at first, but it's kept on getting worse and worse and now it hurts even if I'm laying in bed or sitting. It's been in constant pain for about a month and a half. I have running commitments. Do I have to see a doctor or can this just heal on its own? I really do not want to have to go to the doctor...


    Train SMARTER

      If it has not improved over the past month you may have a stress fracture. I am assuming you have also stopped running and significant impact. Shin splints respond well to non impact. If it has not improved even with normal activity then you need to see a doc and get an x-ray. Be prepared to be non weight bearing for a while if doc sees a fracture or callous formation.

      Run Coach. Recovery Coach. Founder of SMART Approach Training, Coaching & Recovery www.smartapproachtraining.com

        One of the sports medicine clinics near me offers free injury evaluations. They have a physical therapist look at the injury. There are limitations on what they can do, but 2 of the 3 times I went I found it helpful.

         

         

         

         

        JMac11


        I spilled the milk

          If you actually have a stress fracture in your shin, no, you don't need to see a doctor. They're just going to put you on some crutches and say come back in 4 weeks. Why don't you try that for a few weeks and see how it goes before seeing a doc? Of course, you could have something completely different and you risk wasting time with crutches.

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          Interval Junkie --Nobby

            Good advices above.

             

            One way to determine if you actually have a stress-fracture is "The Jump Test".  Jump up and down on that leg.  If you have excruciating pain, then it's a fracture.  If not, it might just be the warning signs or shin splints or something else.

             

            Taking a few weeks off (and keeping your leg on 'light duty') for the latter can help, as long as you don't "pound" when you get back.

             

            If you do have a stress fracture, see a doc.  Likely you'll be put on a month off.  Then a very very slow ramp up.  And by that I mean "1mile a week" at first.  No, not 1mil runs.  1miles total.  Recovery to full could be up to 6months.  This all depends on age.

             

            ^ Speaking from experience in both a suspected stress fracture (foot) that was not.  And a stress fracture in my perineum (at 40yo).

            2021 Goals: 50mpw 'cause there's nothing else to do

            JMac11


            I spilled the milk

               

               

              If you do have a stress fracture, see a doc.  Likely you'll be put on a month off.  Then a very very slow ramp up.  And by that I mean "1mile a week" at first.  No, not 1mil runs.  1miles total.  Recovery to full could be up to 6months.  This all depends on age.

               

              ^ Speaking from experience in both a suspected stress fracture (foot) that was not.  And a stress fracture in my perineum (at 40yo).

               

              I had a stress fracture at age 16 in my shin. It was just as slow for me. I went too fast, too soon. But it was exactly as you described: My too fast too soon was running about 4 miles per week to start. I had to stop and rest again. I was only successful when I started with something like walking 3 laps, running 1 lap on the track. They are one of the hardest injuries to get over. I'll take all my chronic tendon issues over a stress fracture.

              5K: 16:37 (11/20)  |  10K: 34:49 (10/19)  |  HM: 1:14:57 (5/22)  |  FM: 2:36:31 (12/19) 

               

              Next Race: Jersey Shore Half Marathon (10/2)


              Still kicking

                I wasted my money to see a doctor for a stress fracture. I was told exactly what someone above was... stop running, use crutches/cane if it hurts too much, and come back if it doesn't get better, for a immobilization boot or cast, and drugs.

                 

                I immediately quit running completely, and started riding my bike, and strength training. As in the next day. Not just a little, but a lot. 100-200+ miles per week. No trouble doing that, and I got in even better shape, and even started bike racing. I didn't run for 2 years, but when I got back to it, it only took a couple months, to be competitive again, and I ran better than I ever did before.

                 

                Another "test" for a stress fracture, is to use a tuning fork, and touch it to your shin bone in the area of pain. If you go through the roof, it's a stress fracture.

                 

                Here it is, 38 years later, and I can still feel that old stress fracture, especially when I push things a little too far. It's been a nice red flag indicator through the years, for when to back off a bit, and do some more cross training.

                I'm also on Athlinks and Strava

                Luciplay


                  Well, it depends on how bad is it .If I was in your situation, I would definitely go.

                  cookiemonster


                  Connoisseur of Cookies

                    So initially pain with exertion now progressing to pain at rest?  For six weeks?  And not getting better?  Why, exactly, do you not want to go see a medical professional about this?

                     

                    Your brain may say you have running commitments.  Your leg, it seems, has cancelled them.

                     

                    Go get checked out by a medical professional.

                    ***************************************************************************************

                     

                    "C" is for cookie.  That's good enough for me.

                    Christirei


                      i am currently recovering from a stress fracture in my tibia. my experience.... try the jump test, i couldn't do it, also the doctor pressed right on the bone where i was experiencing pain and it was excruciating. when i would press on it it didn't hurt that much, but having someone else do it works better, they will press harder Smile

                       

                      i wore a boot for six weeks. i was allowed to walk but only minimally. i was encouraged to sit as much as possible. no weight bearing exercises except for the walking for mobility purposes. i rode a stationary bike at my gym every day instead. doc told me that was okay unless i started to feeling anything in my leg and in that case i had to stop. no squats, no lunges....

                       

                      after six weeks i went back in and things still weren't quite right so i did another four weeks in the air cast. then i was allowed to start moving again, i think i did several weeks of thirty minute vigorous walking to make sure the pain didn't come back. then i did thirty minutes of 1 minute run/ 9 min walk for a week, only every other day. i moved up minute by minute. when i got to seven minutes run/3 minute walks i decided to skip the rest and go to thirty minute runs, but i still maintained the every other day for at least a couple of weeks, maybe more. doctors advice was to keep it VERY SLOW. currently i'm running five to six miles five days a week, when i was diagnosed with the stress fracture last October i was running fifty miles a week... so i still have a ways to go

                       

                      i am completely pain free and i think things are going well. but when storms come through, i can feel them in my leg!! good luck to you!

                      sugargliderslave


                        Thanks for the advice everyone. It's very helpful!

                        augustus


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