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What is considered Base Miles? (Read 1047 times)

    What is considered a good base before starting speed or tempo work? When I was into bike racing I always put on a base of 1,000 miles before starting strength, speed or tempo training. What is the general rule of thumb for running? I have on my Christmas list running books but who knows what my family will come up with? Smile I started working out again about two years ago and have lost about 30 pounds. My fitness is pretty good even though I have more weight to lose. I ran off and on this summer and decided my knees could handle the running. I just started running consistently (5 times a week) at the end of Oct. I did a race at the beginning of Dec. and felt pretty good about it. Pulling the rookie mistake of letting the crowd take me to fast at first but pulled it back in a ran a bit above my training pace and then really pushed it at the end. Since then my right foot has hurt whether I did to much pounding on the pavement and hills I'm not certain. So I'm back to enjoying the motion of running for now but do want to start training for some races this spring. There are no certain races I want to run at this time other then trying to find a 5K in the spring, 10K in the summer and maybe a HM in the fall barring injury or ther unforseen problems. At the present all of my runs are easy with a 6 mile run on Sat. for a mileage of 20 a week. So what is a general rule of thumb for base mileage? I've looked a training schedules at runners world and cool running, but they just say you should be running X miles a week before this. So what is X miles? I don't want to go to fast and injure myself. Or maybe fast is the the wrong word for me? Embarrassed Thanks for the help! Hope I made sense! Gayle

    "Nothing's better than the wind to your back, the sun in front of you, and your friends beside you." Aaron Douglas Trimble

      Hi, Gayle. I'm not sure anyone has a good answer for this question. I've seen it asked a lot of times, and the answer seems to change depending on who the runner is. Perhaps that's the best answer: depends on the runner. A long time ago I heard a rule of thumb that said you should be averaging weekly a minimum of 3x the length of the race you wanted to run in. So if you wanted to run a 5K race you shouldn't be running less than 9 miles per week. 10 mile race: 30 MPW. And so on. I've not heard anyone ever repeat this advice, so I don't know how accurate it is. And certainly running 9 miles/wk won't make you *competitive* in the 5K distance. Perhaps it's just the minimum to keep from hurting yourself too badly in the actual race... I'd say, find your training plan for the race you want to run in. It'll start out assuming you can run the first week without trouble. If the first week of the plan would be too hard or a stretch for you, then working up to there with just easy runs would be a good place to start. The training plan will probably have speedwork or tempo runs built in - don't do more speedwork than it says... more is not always better. But your first priority should be getting your foot in good shape. See what patterns you can find. Examine your running log. Check your shoes. (How many miles on them?) Try taking 3 rest days in a row and seeing if the pain heals up. If it doesn't, it may be time to check with a sports doc to see what's up. And lay off any speed or tempo work until the foot's better, for sure! Good luck! Janell

      Roads were made for journeys...


      Needs more cowbell!

        A long time ago I heard a rule of thumb that said you should be averaging weekly a minimum of 3x the length of the race you wanted to run in.
        Interesting...by that theory I should have been running ~40mpw for my HM. A marathoner would want to be running close to 80/week...that seems a little excessive for longer races. But I could see that being applicable for maybe anything < a 15k-10mile race. for me i consider my "base miles" whatever is my absolute minimum...which is around 15-20 miles/week right now (divided between 3 runs). by the end of summer and before my long races of fall (a 10 miler and at least one hm) i would like to be doing closer to 30-40 for my base. k a="" 15k-10mile="" race.="" for="" me="" i="" consider="" my="" "base="" miles"="" whatever="" is="" my="" absolute="" minimum...which="" is="" around="" 15-20="" miles/week="" right="" now="" (divided="" between="" 3="" runs).="" by="" the="" end="" of="" summer="" and="" before="" my="" long="" races="" of="" fall="" (a="" 10="" miler="" and="" at="" least="" one="" hm)="" i="" would="" like="" to="" be="" doing="" closer="" to="" 30-40="" for="" my="" base.=""></ a 15k-10mile race. for me i consider my "base miles" whatever is my absolute minimum...which is around 15-20 miles/week right now (divided between 3 runs). by the end of summer and before my long races of fall (a 10 miler and at least one hm) i would like to be doing closer to 30-40 for my base. k>

        Kirsten - aka "Auntie Kirsten"

        '14 Goals:

        • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

        • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)

          Tempo's are one thing, speed work--like fast intervals on a track--are another. The former you can add after just a few weeks of easy mileage, the latter should only be done on top of a big base of mileage. Your definition of "big" will be highly individual. Personally, I don't do any real speed workouts until I've got 5-6 months of 40-50 mpw mileage in the bank and even then, I do very little, depending on my racing goals at the time. The important thing is to know the goal of the workout and make sure it aligns with your overall racing goals.

          Runners run.

            Hi, Gayle. I'm not sure anyone has a good answer for this question. I've seen it asked a lot of times, and the answer seems to change depending on who the runner is. Perhaps that's the best answer: depends on the runner. Janell
            Thanks for the answer. and sorry I asked it again if it's been asked lots of times. I agree with you on the foot. Nothing but easy miles for me until it starts feeling better. I think it's an arch support problem. It did not hurt to run on Sunday and there was a few mild hills on the run. But then on a flat run on Tues it was achy and started hurting when I was walking barefoot in the house later. I've bought inserts trying for more arch support and will see how that goes. So with that said I think I'll continue the easy mileage at least through Jan which will give me almost another 100 miles and see how my body feels from there. I found a 5K race on April 1st that I can shoot for. Thanks again.

            "Nothing's better than the wind to your back, the sun in front of you, and your friends beside you." Aaron Douglas Trimble

              Thanks for the answer. and sorry I asked it again if it's been asked lots of times.
              I didn't mean that you'd put out a dumb question. I meant it's a question a lot of people ask. I've asked it myself, even though I'd seen it get asked and not answered several times before. I've never seen a satisfactory answer - VERY frustrating to those of us who think there should be nice, clear, clean, cut-and-dry answers to everything. :: sigh:: I wish someone would answer it definitively.

              Roads were made for journeys...

                I didn't mean that you'd put out a dumb question. I meant it's a question a lot of people ask. I've asked it myself, even though I'd seen it get asked and not answered several times before. I've never seen a satisfactory answer - VERY frustrating to those of us who think there should be nice, clear, clean, cut-and-dry answers to everything. :: sigh:: I wish someone would answer it definitively.
                I didn't take it as asking a dumb question, I thought maybe I didn't look hard enough on the threads to find the question and answer already asked. I'm a numbers and data person and find it frustrating I can't find a number to put to it. I was hoping to get some running books for Christmas and see what they said. But heavy sigh I guess no one is taking my running to heart. Confused When I told one of my friends who has worked out with me this past few years I had joined the 1000 mile club on this site, the reponse was far from supportive. Heavy Sigh. So like I said I'll put another easy hundred on next month and see how I feel. Thank you so much for taking the time to answer my question. I do appreciate it. Gayle

                "Nothing's better than the wind to your back, the sun in front of you, and your friends beside you." Aaron Douglas Trimble

                  I've sometimes had trouble with my coworkers not really "getting" my running. That seems to be a common problem. Most of the responses I've heard center around them basically saying "Running is such a terrible thing! I would never want to do it and can't see any reason why you would want to. Here, have some of these Christmas goodies!" Okay, they don't use those exact words, but it's close enough! Bit by bit they've gotten better, but it's taken a long time and me just being persistantly upbeat about how *great* and *wonderful* running is and how much I *love* it! It helps that I've lost about 30 pounds in the past year - they're incredibly jealous. Wink However, I sometimes get compliments about how I'm "just wasting away" (at close to 180 pounds, that's hardly accurate!!!) and every now and then someone will tell me that they saw me out running, when, and where. They gleefully announce it to the group, kind of like a "Where is Waldo" game! I guess my point is ... give it more time. Let them come to see running as a permanent quirk of yours... not something you're trying to force on them... and they'll come around. Eventually.

                  Roads were made for journeys...

                    I've sometimes had trouble with my coworkers not really "getting" my running. That seems to be a common problem. . . . I guess my point is ... give it more time. Let them come to see running as a permanent quirk of yours... not something you're trying to force on them... and they'll come around. Eventually.
                    I've had this same problem with co-workers and friends for the past two years since I started watching what I eat and working out again. I've had a very supportive workout crew that has helped me stay on track. In fact with losing almost 30 pounds and putting on muscle definition has been a huge highlight in my life. I still have weight to lose BUT I have muscle defination and don't "jiggle" as much. Big grin I just didn't expect my workout buddies not to be supportive. Hard to figure, but I guess the running world is to different from cardio and weight lifting in the gym world. I use to run in my 20s (which cough, cough - was a LONG time ago) and I had forgotten how much fun it is. I was reading someone's comments here about how they thought about running all the time, and could see myself in her words. To funny! I'm a bit nervious about the 1,000 mile club, but it's only one step at a time, right?! See ya later. Gayle

                    "Nothing's better than the wind to your back, the sun in front of you, and your friends beside you." Aaron Douglas Trimble

                      Sounds like you've got a good background of success. Cool I don't doubt that you can do the 1000 mile club. But if you think that it'll be too much, there's also the 1000Km-621 mile club, who's running 1000 kilometers next year. As I'm sure you've learned these past few years, fitness, running, health, whatever doesn't have to be an all-or-nothing deal. Tongue Making it fun is the best way to go. (Heck, it's the only way to go in my book!) Good luck next year!

                      Roads were made for journeys...