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ran my longest- 8.5 mi (Read 84 times)

Gizmo2019


    i know this is minor to most of you but ive never ran this far in my life. it was my best long run ever !

    i took all your advice and went sllloowww...and no stomach issues (i get cramps if i run too fast for too long), hills and all.

    i finally realize all of what you guys say is true. how your weekday miles should support your weekend miles and not the other way around. i also went slower on the first half and couldnt believe i had the energy to ramp it up the second half. i was hurting in a good way in the end (muscular only), felt good the whole time, and recovered almost completely by the next day.

     

    my 10K race is in 2 weeks...im still hoping to be "fast" (hoping for as close to an hr as possible). ive read that you dont benefit from long runs till much later, but im hoping the slow distance might help my speed?

    i really have one more week to train as i wont be able to taper the last week as much. im going to try to sneak in 2, at the most, taper runs but i will be walking lots in between.

     

    still pondering what speed i should start my first half of the 10K so that i can shoot for 60 min but not totally die.

     

    also hoping to reach my summer goal of hitting 10 miles next weekend on my final long run before the race. double digits!

     

    is it weird that i havent been able to stop thinking about my run? im obsessed!


    MoBramExam

      No faster than 11:00ish first couple of miles.

       



      CanadianMeg


      Cirque du Sore Legs 2019

        Instead of looking at your 10k as two races (one pace for the first 5k and a different one for the second), I would shoot for an even pace. Try not to go out too fast and try for an even pace through the race. If you feel good, you can pick it up in the last mile. A 10 miler next weekend isn't going to impact your race day, except in a mental way. Try not to get too wrapped up in the numbers and miss out on enjoying the race experience, especially if it's your first 10k. Smile

        "Don't feel like running today...suck it up and run ...you're an athlete." (John Stanton, founder & owner of The Running Room)

         

        Half Fanatic #9292. 20 Half Marathons and Counting... :)

          Try not to get too wrapped up in the numbers and miss out on enjoying the race experience, especially if it's your first 10k. Smile

           

          +1

           

          Its amazing how much of a tunnel vision you get when running close to your redline.  Takes a lot away from your first long race experience.  Try and remember the scenery, camaraderie of running with a few hundred of your new friends,  how running faster than you've ever run in your training feels so much easier in the race etc.  You can then leverage these positive feelings for your subsequent races when you try and improve your time


          It's a setup

            Awesome. Chances are good that you'll see some adaptation from that run in the next 2 weeks.

            Gizmo2019


              Thank you all! ill keep this all in mind!

              Gizmo2019


                Actually I meant that I was thinking to break up the race in thirds.

                1st 2 miles this pace

                2nd 2 miles that pace

                last 2.2 miles whatever..

                 

                but I have no idea what to expect so I’ll just try to enjoy it like you all said!

                Tchuck


                  Actually I meant that I was thinking to break up the race in thirds.

                  1st 2 miles this pace

                  2nd 2 miles that pace

                  last 2.2 miles whatever..

                   

                  but I have no idea what to expect so I’ll just try to enjoy it like you all said!

                  The strongest advice I can give you is to start conservative. Start 20% slower than you think you should. Because of adrenaline, even a too fast of a pace will feel kind of easy early on. But, beleive me, it will catch up to you fast. The last thing you want is to be at 1/2 mile or 1 mile and feel gased and distressed and be forced to slow down when really the race is just starting.  I don't think you will like your race experience if you start too fast and have to hold on for dear life. Think about, if you are feeling good at 3 miles, there is a lot of race still left to pick up the pace. Also, when you do so, you will be passing runners vs you being passed. Psychologically and physically, you will feel so much better about the race if you have the ability to finish stronger, and you will easily make up any time you lost from being a bit conservative early on and have a faster overall time. Enjoy it.

                  H-WAVE - Helping Athletes Reduce Pain and Recover Faster

                  Gizmo2019


                    This is good advice. I hope I Am able to restrain myself. My worry is that ill lose time if I start off too slow. However I know this method works bc I’ve done it in training. The only difference being that I wasn’t racing in my training (for once!).

                    dpschumacher


                      Distance runs will improve your speed. Part of speed is the underlying ability to sustain it. Be proud. Pacing is important too but if you are hanging on with all your energy just to run a 10k, it is hard to race it. If you can run 10k easy because you have run longer many times, then you can focus on pushing the pace. In running we call it base building. And remember the half marathon is just around the corner once you start going 8, 9, 10 miles. ;-)

                      2019 Goal: Run every day

                      2019 Goal: Get to 165 lbs

                      2019 Goal: Get in shape to be able to run 2 marathons in 2020

                      Tchuck


                        This is good advice. I hope I Am able to restrain myself. My worry is that ill lose time if I start off too slow. However I know this method works bc I’ve done it in training. The only difference being that I wasn’t racing in my training (for once!).

                        You will lose A LOT more on your final time by starting too fast vs starting conservative. You may think you can't make up but I promise you, you will make it up and more and feel soooo much better about your performance. Inexperienced racers make this mistake all the time and I think there is a greater than 50/50 chance you do the same. You can't help it. I get it but am asking you to try very hard to race smart.

                         

                        AND when I say start conservative I don't mean start slow. What I mean is to have the mindset of starting 20% slower. The adrenaline will have you running faster than that....you just HAVE to tame the adrenaline if you are an inexperienced racer. Race strategy is so crucial for you to perform your best and for YOU, the absolute best strategy is a conservative start.

                        H-WAVE - Helping Athletes Reduce Pain and Recover Faster

                        Gizmo2019


                          Thanks  Dpschumacher. I actually ran my first 10 mi yesterday! And strangely no major problems. My knee was starting to twinge a bit but I was able to pick up the pace near the end. It was exhilarating!

                          I was just thinking that I’m this close to a half marathon distance!

                           

                          tchuck:  everything you said, I believe. It’s going to be difficult for me to stay slow bc I have a certain goal I want to achieve. For a full marathon, I don’t care too much about time. I just would LIKE to finish before 6hrs...would be great if it were about 5-5:30hrs.

                           

                          But for this 10k for some reason I’m stuck on “I have to beat THIS time bc it’s such a “short” race compared to a full, and I’m better than that.” 🙄🙄🙄

                           

                          most of it is bc I’ve been running a little over a yr and made great strides and can go fast for very short distances.

                           

                          but the biggest thing is if I don’t have an exact number/plan to follow I’m going to end up going a bit faster. It always happens. I’m doing an easy run and I finish faster at the end. Or I say I’m going to go slow but I end up starting “just a bit” faster.

                           

                          So yiure right in that i hat I probably will make a huge mistake!!  I wish someone could just tell me what speed to run at! But that person has to be someone who sees me running, feels what I feel while running, everyday. And that would be ME! Ugh. It’s bad enough being solely responsible for little kids, now I gotta dictate how my runs should go too.

                           

                          the other thing is, I do all my weekday runs (easy, tempo, 400m) on the treadmill. I THINK it’s calibrated pretty close to my gps watch. I feel like I’m running about the same pace.

                          And although my outdoor runs are ONLy long runs (so I keep it at an 11-12:00 pace), my treadmill runs lowest pace are about 10:20.

                           

                          That is easy for me and by the time I’m half done..it’s up to 10-9:30 depending on how strong I feel. And that will last 20 - 10 min, respectively.

                           

                          on the road, I usually start around 11:30 pace. It’s a long run that’s getting longer so Ive learned (after MONTHS) to control myself.

                           

                          one person here told me to start at 11:00. I can TRY, but I already have in my head that I’ll start at 10:30 😬

                          I’m already doing the math in my head...if I start 2 miles at this pace, plus 2 miles at that, divide by total, what time will I finish etc...

                           

                          😩

                            one person here told me to start at 11:00. I can TRY, but I already have in my head that I’ll start at 10:30 😬

                            I’m already doing the math in my head...if I start 2 miles at this pace, plus 2 miles at that, divide by total, what time will I finish etc...

                             

                            Start at the back of the field where the slower runners will force you to start slow for the first mile. You will feel energized every time you pass someone and the chip time is the only thing which matters. Start out conservative so your last 2 miles are full of energy instead of you being out of gas and having to walk.

                             

                            Stop worrying about what your time will be and focus on having a great experience so you will be motivated to do another long race a month or two later. If you push too hard and crash at the end, you will say to yourself "why did I invest all that time training to have such a bad time at the race?"

                             

                            I am new like you and ran my first 10k exactly a year ago (many 5k's before that). My 10k PR a month ago was almost 9 minutes faster than my first 10k and I have run several longer races since. Running has become my new hobby and I really feel like I owe it to that first 10k because I started conservative and felt so energized at the end.

                            Memphis / serious runner for 2 years / 33 male

                            5k - 21:01 (SEP 19) / 10k - 46:30 (SEP 19) / Half - 1:48:03 (MAR 19) / Full - no interest in killing myself

                            Races - currently running in MRTC Road Runners Series (5k, 5m, 10k, 10m, and half)

                            Gizmo2019


                               

                              Start at the back of the field where the slower runners will force you to start slow for the first mile. You will feel energized every time you pass someone and the chip time is the only thing which matters. Start out conservative so your last 2 miles are full of energy instead of you being out of gas and having to walk.

                               

                              Stop worrying about what your time will be and focus on having a great experience so you will be motivated to do another long race a month or two later. If you push too hard and crash at the end, you will say to yourself "why did I invest all that time training to have such a bad time at the race?"

                               

                              I am new like you and ran my first 10k exactly a year ago (many 5k's before that). My 10k PR a month ago was almost 9 minutes faster than my first 10k and I have run several longer races since. Running has become my new hobby and I really feel like I owe it to that first 10k because I started conservative and felt so energized at the end.

                              This is good. Thank you...