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Tips for preventing bowel movement during distance races (Read 461 times)

FreeSoul87


Runs4Sanity

    The closest places open before 6 a.m are 3 gas stations all pretty much right next to each other 1-2 miles from my house.

     

     

    Don't you know where the foreclosed / vacant houses are by now?

     

    Also, I'd like to mention that I live 1.2 miles from a McDonalds,  1.8 miles from Dunkin Donuts, 3.2 miles from Wendys, and 3.6 miles from a different Dunkin Donuts.  I chose my routes wisely.

    *Do It For Yourself, Do It Because They Said It Was Impossible, Do It Because They Said You Were Incapable*

    PRs

    5k - 24:40 (7:57 min/mile pace) 

    10k - 54:39 (8:48 min/mile pace)

    15k -1:24:04 (9:01 min/mile pace)

    13.1 - 1:56:38 (8:54 min/mile pace) Sub 2 hours!!!

     

      Has anyone carried Imodium during a race/run and waited to take it only when it became necessary? Wondering how quick it works and if it would stop the build up of the "Oh no" feeling once it started. Not sure I want to try it pre race, but maybe as an emergency last resort? Probably couldn't hurt at that point, right?

        This is a shitty thread.

         

         

        mab411


        Proboscis Colossus

           

          Don't you know where the foreclosed / vacant houses are by now?

           

          Also, I'd like to mention that I live 1.2 miles from a McDonalds,  1.8 miles from Dunkin Donuts, 3.2 miles from Wendys, and 3.6 miles from a different Dunkin Donuts.  I chose my routes wisely.

           

          Sounds like you've got a great fueling scenario there.

          "God guides us on our journey, but careful with those feet." - David Lee Roth, of all people


          Kill

            Has anyone carried Imodium during a race/run and waited to take it only when it became necessary? Wondering how quick it works and if it would stop the build up of the "Oh no" feeling once it started. Not sure I want to try it pre race, but maybe as an emergency last resort? Probably couldn't hurt at that point, right?

             

            Yes. I've carried it / packed in drop bag for a couple ultras / long trail training runs for an emergency last resort. Didn't need it - so I don't know how fast acting it is. But it was nice knowing it was there - just in case.

            Passion is a rather frightening thing because if you have passion you don't know where it will take you.

             

            When it’s all said and done, will you have said more than you’ve done?


            just a simple cat

              Has anyone carried Imodium during a race/run and waited to take it only when it became necessary? Wondering how quick it works and if it would stop the build up of the "Oh no" feeling once it started. Not sure I want to try it pre race, but maybe as an emergency last resort? Probably couldn't hurt at that point, right?

               

              I have tried it at the first "Oh No" moment and had it control things.  I have also taken it when things are a bit more 'imminent' and it did not stop or slow the inevitable slide ..so to speak.

               

               


              sugnim

                Wow.  I'm kind of surprised at the number of people who take preemptive meds before running.  Do you guys notice any side effects?  Or do you just head out & feel great the whole time & then get back to normal after the race?

                 

                I just go out and hope for the best, but in any run over 10 miles, there is bound to be a painful 30 minutes in there somewhere for me.  In fact, last night, I did 8 on the trails & had some painful moments.  I just always have thought that was a problem I had to deal with.  In fact, I've never been able to run more than 14 miles due to GI issues.  But, I've never thought to preemptively medicate for this.  That seems very strange to me.

                  Wow.  I'm kind of surprised at the number of people who take preemptive meds before running.  Do you guys notice any side effects?  Or do you just head out & feel great the whole time & then get back to normal after the race?

                   

                  I just go out and hope for the best, but in any run over 10 miles, there is bound to be a painful 30 minutes in there somewhere for me.  In fact, last night, I did 8 on the trails & had some painful moments.  I just always have thought that was a problem I had to deal with.  In fact, I've never been able to run more than 14 miles due to GI issues.  But, I've never thought to preemptively medicate for this.  That seems very strange to me.

                   

                  It hadn't occurred to me either.  Clearly, doping is rampant in the running community. Smile

                  Well at least someone here is making relevance to the subject.

                     

                    I have tried it at the first "Oh No" moment and had it control things.  I have also taken it when things are a bit more 'imminent' and it did not stop or slow the inevitable slide ..so to speak.

                     

                    Thanks. I think I will carry a couple with me in my next marathon with the idea of taking them at the slightest hint of that discomfort starting. I am also wondering.. in that "preventative situation," would the Imodium Multi-Symptom be a better choice than the Imodium AD? The description of the Multi sounds like it fights the early stages like gas, cramps, etc, and not just clearing up diarrhea like the AD.

                    Julia1971


                    All in for Boston

                       

                      Thanks. I think I will carry a couple with me in my next marathon with the idea of taking them at the slightest hint of that discomfort starting. I am also wondering.. in that "preventative situation," would the Imodium Multi-Symptom be a better choice than the Imodium AD? The description of the Multi sounds like it fights the early stages like gas, cramps, etc, and not just clearing up diarrhea like the AD.

                       

                      Generally, I try to take the least amount of a med that I need to take.  And, I think (I'm too lazy to go upstairs and read the package), Imodium works by messing with the water retention in your gut.  So, I think this is something to be careful with and not assume stronger is better.  And, definitely try it on a long run before a race...  FWIW, I'm very caffeine sensitive.  So, while the coffee recommendation is good and fine for most people, I opt to take Imodium on marathon race day - I don't take it for training runs and shorter races - to avoid over-caffeinating.  I can drink about a true cup of coffee in the morning but that's about it without incurring gitters.

                      Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage. - Anais Nin


                      Boston Strong in 2014!

                        This is a strangely interesting thread. I must say I never thought of taking anything to deal with the problem; just took some of the preventive measures others have described. It's not an issue on my long runs because my routes go through and near a couple of public parks so I am never more than 3 miles from a restroom (and feel very lucky not to have to run near McD's and DDs). During two marathons I lost precious minutes dealing with "imminent" issues, but not in the last three -- maybe my preventive measures have been more effective. I'm thinking of testing use of immodium AD before my next marathon to see if it is worth taking along just in case.

                         

                        BTW, the two times I had problems I am pretty sure it was due to the fuel I was taking. In one race, I was trying a new brand of gel that I had used several times during training without ill effects, but it was a disaster on race day. In the second race, I tried a new flavor because I ran out of my favorite. I can't be sure that these were the causes, but I am extra careful now. I don't think I really need gu or gels on my training runs but I make it a point to use them in the weeks prior to a marathon just to make sure that my stomach is acclimated.

                        2014 goals

                        2000 miles; 5k < 24:30; HM < 1:56Century Bike Ride

                         

                        Upcoming:

                        NYC Half Marathon 3/16Boston Marathon 4/21

                        Julia1971


                        All in for Boston

                          This is a strangely interesting thread. I must say I never thought of taking anything to deal with the problem; just took some of the preventive measures others have described. It's not an issue on my long runs because my routes go through and near a couple of public parks so I am never more than 3 miles from a restroom (and feel very lucky not to have to run near McD's and DDs). During two marathons I lost precious minutes dealing with "imminent" issues, but not in the last three -- maybe my preventive measures have been more effective. I'm thinking of testing use of immodium AD before my next marathon to see if it is worth taking along just in case.

                           

                          BTW, the two times I had problems I am pretty sure it was due to the fuel I was taking. In one race, I was trying a new brand of gel that I had used several times during training without ill effects, but it was a disaster on race day. In the second race, I tried a new flavor because I ran out of my favorite. I can't be sure that these were the causes, but I am extra careful now. I don't think I really need gu or gels on my training runs but I make it a point to use them in the weeks prior to a marathon just to make sure that my stomach is acclimated.

                           

                          I think figuring out how to prevent it is ideal.  I only take Imodium for marathons.  (But didn't take it for Boston 2012 because, with the heat, I didn't think I should have anything in me messing with what my body was doing with water).  I just don't want to stop.  But, if I had to stop on a training run, it wouldn't be a big deal.  But, I never really have that problem.  Through trial and error, I generally know what's going to cause me problems.

                           

                          As far as marathon fueling, when I first start training for them, I would take Gu since that seemed to be the brand everyone used.  But, it almost always gave me GI problems.  So then, I switched to gummies.  And, I was fine with them but they're so bulky!  This cycle, I've been using Clif Shots and they seem to agree with me pretty well.  We'll see...

                          Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage. - Anais Nin


                          Boston Strong in 2014!

                             

                            I think figuring out how to prevent it is ideal.  I only take Imodium for marathons.  (But didn't take it for Boston 2012 because, with the heat, I didn't think I should have anything in me messing with what my body was doing with water).  I just don't want to stop.  But, if I had to stop on a training run, it wouldn't be a big deal.  But, I never really have that problem.  Through trial and error, I generally know what's going to cause me problems.

                             

                            As far as marathon fueling, when I first start training for them, I would take Gu since that seemed to be the brand everyone used.  But, it almost always gave me GI problems.  So then, I switched to gummies.  And, I was fine with them but they're so bulky!  This cycle, I've been using Clif Shots and they seem to agree with me pretty well.  We'll see...

                             

                            I've used Clif Shots a lot and I like them, too. Never had any GI problems and you can adjust the amount easily -- take 3 of one kind or take 2 plain and 1 caffeinated etc. The only downside, and this is a little embarrassing, is that I found that in the last stages of a marathon or triathlon it sometimes feels like a lot of effort just to chew! Handling them can also get my fingers sticky which I don't like. I know this is a bit OC but little things feel much bigger at miles 20-26. Sucking on a gel is much easier.

                            2014 goals

                            2000 miles; 5k < 24:30; HM < 1:56Century Bike Ride

                             

                            Upcoming:

                            NYC Half Marathon 3/16Boston Marathon 4/21

                            Julia1971


                            All in for Boston

                               

                              I've used Clif Shots a lot and I like them, too. Never had any GI problems and you can adjust the amount easily -- take 3 of one kind or take 2 plain and 1 caffeinated etc. The only downside, and this is a little embarrassing, is that I found that in the last stages of a marathon or triathlon it sometimes feels like a lot of effort just to chew! Handling them can also get my fingers sticky which I don't like. I know this is a bit OC but little things feel much bigger at miles 20-26. Sucking on a gel is much easier.

                               

                              I've also been experimenting with caffeinated gels and in the end, I think I'm too afraid to take them on race day.  As I mentioned upthread, I can do a cup of coffee in the morning but much more than that and I risk getting kinda jittery...  Yeah, I don't like the packaging for the Clif Shot.  What's with the "litter leash"?  When I tear open the package, the litter leash is broken so I can't tie it to anything.  Am I missing something?  I can totally see that dangling piece of packaging is going to drive me nuts on race day.  Edited to add: I think I get it.  The litter leash stops ME from littering.  Ahhhhh!  Very clever Clif people.  Still annoying, but clever.

                              Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage. - Anais Nin

                                I don't have much to add on the prevention side, but I do have some recent first hand experience in dealing with this during a race.

                                 

                                This past Saturday I ran the Akron Half Marathon and despite a convincing morning routine, my guts were not, in fact, entirely empty.

                                 

                                I began this race with a friend from my running club and both of us were targeting sub 90, which according to my other races this year, was well within reach, but would be a PR nonetheless. Unfortunately at mile 8, my guts made it known, they couldn't hang on through 13.1. Just prior to stopping I said to my friend "you've got this, finish strong, I'll see you at the finish." He wished me luck and I dodged into the port-o-jon pausing my watch for the pit stop.

                                 

                                I made very quick work of it (setting my first PR of the day, gross I know, but hey). Afterwards, I felt so much better, just with a heightened amount of anxiety. I told myself not to go too crazy trying to make up the time lost, but on the long straights, I thought I could see the bright green of my running buddy's shirt in the distance. This fueled the drive to catch him. I knew his pace would be steady, and I though I had a little more to give than he, so I slowly cranked it up. The closer I got to the green shirt in the distance, the more intently my drive.

                                 

                                I caught him just before mile 11, and keeping the pace, proceeded to make mile 13 the fastest of the race in 6:11. Official time stated 1:27:43, exactly 60 seconds behind my watch.

                                 

                                The reason I post is to say that while this situation is never ideal, racing is about making the most of the hand you're dealt that day. Running that edge between control and being beyond the limit. On this particular day had I not let myself believe I had a chance to catch back up to my friend, I may not have found the drive to push to the time I did.

                                 

                                So, rain, wind, GI distress make the most of it, no matter what!

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