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New to running (Read 925 times)

AnnaDowning


    Hi everyone.

     

    I'm new to running and just started with a group (Howard County Striders) to learn how to run.  Is it normal for you to feel out of shape and walk when you get out of breath with running? 

     

    I've been exercising 3-4 times a week but never ran before so this is new to me.

     

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated as I want to stick with running.  Thanks!Smile

     

    Anna


    day after day sameness

      Completely normal.  You have to build up your body's ability to run over time.

       

      Walk as much as you need.

      I've done my best to live the right way; I get up every morning and go to work each day...

        Welcome to this great sport! It is addictive though... you have been warnedSmile

         

        Walking is perfectly okay. However, if you slow down, you may be able to run more. The difference between running and walking is that when you are walking, one foot is always on the ground; when you are running there are moments when both of your feet are in the air. If you try to run at the slowest possible speed while following the definition of running, you might be able to run more.

        running is somewhat like playing golf to me.   crappy shots all day long, ready to give it up & wondering why I'm trying so hard just to get this stupid little ball into a stupid little hole but then out of the blue comes a monster drive or a long putt that actually gets into the cup.  bingo! that one shot keeps me going for the rest of day no matter how crappy I continue to play & gets me back out again on another day.   strange. -- skyedog

          Congrats on getting started! You shouldn't be out of breath when doing everyday running. That's reserved for specific speed work or racing, which you shouldn't be doing just yet. If you are running as easy as possible and you are out of breath, I suggest getting a heart rate monitor to keep yourself at an aerobic intensity. There are several suggested zones out there that you could work in. What will happen, is that you will probably have to do some walking in order to stay at or under that heart rate. But as you get fitter, eventually you won't be able to walk fast enough to reach your target HR, and will probably be running mostly. Most of all, educate yourself about running. There are some basics that you should know to increase the probability that this will be a good, healthy experience for you.

           

          Google these (I've also included some links):

           

          --Aerobic running, aerobic training, Base Training 

          ---heart rate training

          --Dr. Phil Maffetone, "Heart Rate Training For The Compleat Idiot" by John Parker

          --the importance of rest and recovery

           


          Good luck. Cool
          --Jimmy

          log   prs      Crusted Salt comic #141

           


          HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer

            Completely normal.  You have to build up your body's ability to run over time.

             

            Walk as much as you need.

             

            Yes, I was going to say this too -- I remember getting out of breath and having to walk. I think it is a common experience with getting used to running, and I think your body has to build up some stuff -- um, better blood transport, and better ability to pump oxygen, and I don't know what all...

            It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.

              It's completely normal to feel out of shape when you first start running, and it's normal to get out of breath if you try to run before your body is ready to run.

               

              Any form of running (both feet are off the ground at some point) will make your heart work harder than it does when you're walking, even if you're "running" at the same speed at which you were walking.  Since you're (apparently) running with a group, you may be trying to keep up with people who are in better running shape than you are, hence your out-of-breath condition.

               

              Try alternating walking and jogging.  As your fitness increases, you'll find that you need to walk less and less, and then one day, you'll run/jog for twenty minutes without walking at all.  Then, you're on your way!

              "It's hard to dance with a devil on your back, so shake him off, oh wo-oh!" - Florence Welch (Florence + The Machine) - Shake It Out

              TJN


              S Army Kettle run...

                All good advice above ...  When I first started, I was in the same boat.  One of the guys in our little running group filled me in on the "conversational pace" rule .   

                 

                If you can't carry on a conversation, you're going to fast ...  if you can sing a song, you're going to slow.

                 

                Yup ... early on I did talk to myself  just to check my pace.  After awhile, you learn what you need to feel like ... and you're off and running.  

                Tim 


                Fat butt on couch

                  New runners tend to try and push too hard.  If you feel the need to walk, walk.  Then when you start running again, RUN SLOWER.  If you still need to walk, RUN SLOWER YET.  It doesn't matter if you're running slower than you could speedwalk.

                   

                  There is nothing wrong with walking.  There is also nothing wrong with running slowly.  You're molding yourself into a fitter person and everyone here has the utmost respect for the effort.

                   

                  Running constantly...no matter how slowly...will help you get to where you can do it faster.  Don't worry about speed, worry about just getting the running in.  Speed will come all by itself.  The good part about being a newer runner is that you have YEARS of steady improvement in front of you, just there for the taking.

                  "If you want to be a bad a$s, then do what a bad a$s does.  There's your pep talk for today.  Go Run." -- Slo_Hand

                   

                    What everybody else said.  Running slow is good, running too fast will make the whole experience so miserable that you end up quitting. 

                     

                    It's a good idea to log your runs.  When you feel discouraged, you can look back at where you were and see how much improvement you have made. 

                     

                    I did a lot of walking during my first year of running.  Now I run marathons. 

                      All good advice above ...  When I first started, I was in the same boat.  One of the guys in our little running group filled me in on the "conversational pace" rule .   

                       

                      If you can't carry on a conversation, you're going to fast ...  if you can sing a song, you're going to slow.

                       

                      Yup ... early on I did talk to myself  just to check my pace.  After awhile, you learn what you need to feel like ... and you're off and running.  

                       

                       

                      I thought I was the only one that talked to myself to check my breathing.  I don't feel quite so crazy now. 

                       

                      To OP take your time and get used to being on your feet.  I know this was the best advice I ever recieved. 

                      My sport's your sport's punishment

                       

                      2012 goals

                                    

                      100 Km month         150 K month      200K month

                      5K run    10K run     20K run              30K run

                      sub 30 min 5K         sub 55min 10K