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swim vs running equivalent values (Read 4361 times)


Kill

    Thanks for the explanation. I'm hungry for cookies now though.

    Passion is a rather frightening thing because if you have passion you don't know where it will take you.

     

    When it’s all said and done, will you have said more than you’ve done?

    xor


      I will add that the 1500yd : 5k comparison is for me and my effort.  I think the key point would be "my" and "I".  However, I notice that the ratio for you and for "Sean" were also about the same.  I'm guessing that both you, Sean, and I are all swimming enough to have a good feel for the proper ratio.

       

      Now, I understand that some of the others who don't swim or swim downhill would have different ratios, and I think that's what some of the other responses refer to.  I remember my first outing swimming laps, I would have thought that about 300 yards was about the same effort as a 5k, but that's because I was swimming like a sunken dutch windmill.

       

      Brian

       

       

      Somewhat... the real point is that when we run, we are working more than just cardio.  Bones, muscles, other systems, etc.  If we want to say "hey, I'm trying to figure out what will help my cardiovascular fitness about as much as running x miles", that's one thing.  But an equivalency between running and swimming?  Alas, it doesn't really work that way.

       

      This comes up a lot on running message boards, usually phrased as a way to add some amount of swimming or biking or bowling to one's mpw.  It doesn't really work like that.  Running 50 mpw (except 10 was via some conversion from swimming) is really 40 mpw plus kick ass crosstraining.

       

      So if you want a rough equivalency for your own purposes, okey doke.  But it really isn't the same thing (so, not 'equivalent') and in a public forum, you have to be able to accept that some responders will call that out.

       


      Kill

        swim downhill

         

        Are these miles equivalent to white water rafting miles?

        Passion is a rather frightening thing because if you have passion you don't know where it will take you.

         

        When it’s all said and done, will you have said more than you’ve done?

          Somewhat... the real point is that when we run, we are working more than just cardio.  Bones, muscles, other systems, etc.  If we want to say "hey, I'm trying to figure out what will help my cardiovascular fitness about as much as running x miles", that's one thing.  But an equivalency between running and swimming?  Alas, it doesn't really work that way.

           

          This comes up a lot on running message boards, usually phrased as a way to add some amount of swimming or biking or bowling to one's mpw.  It doesn't really work like that.  Running 50 mpw (except 10 was via some conversion from swimming) is really 40 mpw plus kick ass crosstraining.

           

          So if you want a rough equivalency for your own purposes, okey doke.  But it really isn't the same thing (so, not 'equivalent') and in a public forum, you have to be able to accept that some responders will call that out.

           

          Fair enough.  Definitely agree with your 50 mpw comparison and the conversions.

          2014 Goals:

          #1: Do what I can do. <DOING>

          #2: 365 Hours training

           

            Are these miles equivalent to white water rafting miles?

             

            No, that's when you're sinking.... either your entire body, or just your feet.

            2014 Goals:

            #1: Do what I can do. <DOING>

            #2: 365 Hours training

             


            Needs more cowbell!

              I think the only way one can compare different aerobic activities is simple calorie burn.  Otherwise it's still apples-to-oranges.  I think the conversion of running to cycling in terms of calories is generally something in the neighborhood of a 1:3 thing in terms of mileage, but that still is ultra-simplified.  A cyclist on a relatively heavier bike will burn more calories/mile than a person on a lighter weight frame with lighter wheels and better hubs.  None of those calorie estimates give equipment specifics like that.  And it's literally a YMMV sort of deal.  While the rule of thumb may be 1:3 for basic calorie burn, individual strengths have great bearing in terms of effort and workout quality.  I'm not a swimmer, so I can't attest to that in any fashion, but when I started cycling I felt that the 1:3 comparison between running and cycling seemed pretty accurate in terms of effort and recovery.  A year+ later I feel like (for me) it's closer to 1:4.  But I'm also on a better, lighter bike and have an added year of bike fitness.

               

              So, yeah, the question is totally loaded.  There's no legitimate way to measure these things against one-another objectively.  Time at similar effort is probably your best bet.

              Kirsten - aka "Auntie Kirsten"

              '14 Goals:

              • 2 olympic distance duathlons -- 6 days apart -- PR at least 1

              • 130#s (and stay there, gotdammit!)


              HobbyJogger & HobbyRacer

                swim downhill

                 

                I like the (presumably apocryphal) claim that the New York Tri swim is downhill -- a bag of cheetos did it in 21 minutes.

                It's a 5k. It hurt like hell...then I tried to pick it up. The end.


                A Saucy Wench

                  I was a swimmer first.  Then I became a runner exclusively.  When I tried to get back to swimming I noticed the ratio had changed significantly. 

                   

                  I have in the past (back when my log consisted of a sheet in excel) calculated a "run equivalent mile" for swimming, cycling and other aerobic shit.  Now it seems like more effort than it is worth unless I think there will be a lake in the middle of my next 10K (which in Oregon is entirely possible from November to May).

                   

                  I have employed "REQ"'s while pregnant or injured to keep myself from feeling depressed about lack of miles.

                   

                  That stopped when I realized that overdoing the Xtraining for me means making an aerobic system that my tendons cant keep up with. 

                  I have become Death, the destroyer of electronic gadgets

                   

                  "When I got too tired to run anymore I just pretended I wasnt tired and kept running anyway" - dd, age 7

                  dallasboycows


                    i agree and if you aren't a swimmer, your pacing for your swim/run are going to make them non-equivalent anyways as they are so different.  And you certainly can't go by heart rate as running HR is much higher for swimming and aquajogging breathing is more with less effort as the water puts compression on your lungs.  No doubt though, swimming is AWESOME cardio.  I cut two minutes off my 5k with NO running for 2 weeks and then one light week of running when I hurt my ankle.

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