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Adding eyelets to steel frame to increase cargo load capacity (Read 8 times)

patarch1


New Haven 08

    Hi,

    This group's population always seems to have good insight and a enough variety in the answers that I am sure it will help.

    I have a steel road bike that I like a lot. I have used it on long rides (100 miles +) and carried up to 20 lbs (limit of seat post clamped rear rack) However it has no eyelet to install  racks or fenders (both fork and rear).

    I looked at the P clamp solution but it looks bulky and the more parts, the more chances of failure.

    Before I go out and find a welder to add the eyelets I was wondering if anyone had an opinion on the subject.

    The frame is in excellent condition and is well made and I intended to keep it for the next decade or more.

     

    Thanks in advance for the constructive (or not) feedback.

     

    Patrick

    200 mile bike trip in three days with sleeping gear and change.

    Get the Saturday running club back up.

    Run below 8 minutes per mile for 6 miles.

     

      Outside of of welding on eyelets, P-Clamps or ghetto...hardware store DYI, is the only thing I'm aware of.

       

      If you go with the welding option, pick a good welder. Too much heat can weaken the steel. I would even consider shipping the bike to a private frame builder.

      Would you repaint the bike when you are done?

       

      I actually have a steel frame Fuji behind me right now. The eyelets on this bike are forged in.

       

       

      The frame is in excellent condition and is well made and I intended to keep it for the next decade or more.

       

       

      I love old school steel frame road bikes...I would love to get my hands on a 70's or 80's Masi.

      www.hplg.net  The Human Powered League - Solo Cup Series - Trail Building

      patarch1


      New Haven 08

        Painting the bike will be necessary since the surface prep needs bare metal. I will strip the frame of its component anyway prior to getting close to any welder or source of heat.

        200 mile bike trip in three days with sleeping gear and change.

        Get the Saturday running club back up.

        Run below 8 minutes per mile for 6 miles.